Jennet Conant: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Steve Kroft wife pics photos pictures

Conant and Kroft pictured together in 2008. (Getty)

Jennet Conant has been married to CBS 60 Minutes correspondent Steve Kroft since 1991. The couple are at the center of a media firestorm after allegations emerged that Kroft has been having an affair with New York lawyer Lisan Goines.

Here’s what you need to know:


1. Steve Kroft First Began Having an Affair in 2011

According to the National Enquirer, who broke the story of Kroft’s affair, the CBS newsman first met Goines at a hotel in New York in 2011. The two then carried on an affair for some time. Their dalliance included the exchanging of racy text messages, one of those texts read, “Miss you and all that goes with it. Especially my favorite tastes and colors… pink and brown.” The affair allegedly ended when Kroft “became too selfish,” reports the Enquirer.


2. Kroft Allegedly Told His Mistress That He Was in a ‘Sexless Marriage’

Steve Kroft Traitor's Wife

Steve Kroft pictured at the book launch for The Traitor’s Wife in March 2014. (Getty)

Kroft admitted the affair in a statement referenced by the Enquirer. He told the reporter that he and his wife were committed to making their marriage work and would remain together. In the Enquirer report, Kroft allegedly convinced Lisan Goines that he was in a sexless marriage.


3. The Couple Have One Son, Who Goes to Julliard

(Getty)

(Getty)

The Associated Press reported on July 2, 1991, that Kroft and Conant had married in Martha’s Vineyard. The couple’s nuptials took place exactly one year after they first met in Los Angeles. The only CBS representative at the wedding was the legendary Mike Wallace. In the AP piece, Conant, 55, is referred to as a “freelance writer.”

(Getty)

(Getty)

According to Kroft’s CBS News profile, the couple live in New York City and also in Sag Harbor in Long Island. They have one son, John Conant Kroft. He’s a student at the prestigious Julliard Academy. In March 2013, John Kroft spoke about his experiences in auditioning for the school:

During the first part of my audition, we were asked to do monologues that were songs. I’m not a singer by any means, and so when we were given direction for our monologues and I was told to do mine “really badly,” I had no problem with that. It made the rest of the process so much easier!


4. One of Conant’s Book Was Titled A Covert Affair

Conant is highly respected author and journalist. According to her profile at publisher Schuster & Schuster’s website, she has written two New York Times bestsellers, The Irregulars: Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington and Tuxedo Park: A Wall Street Tycoon and the Secret Palace of Science That Changed the Course of World War II. In reviewing Tuxedo Park, Joanthan Yardley of the Washington Post wrote:

As was true of her excellent first book, Tuxedo Park, in The Irregulars she removes the dust of history from a forgotten but important figure to be reckoned with before and during the war.

Another of her books was called A Covert Affair: Julia Child and Paul Child in the OSS, the book was about the experiences of celebrity chef Julia Child during World War II.

As a journalist, she’s written for Vanity Fair, Esquire, Newsweek, GQ, and the New York Times.


5. Her Grandfather Was the President of Harvard During WWII

Harvard President James Conant.

Former Harvard President James Conant. (Wikipedia)

She was born in South Korea to American parents in 1959. Her mother was an art historian and her father was a documentary filmmaker who was in the country working for the United Nations. Later she grew up in Tokyo before her family settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her family had strong ties in that state, her grandfather, James B. Conant was the “transformative” president of Harvard University between 1933 and 1953. In an editorial for the Los Angeles Times in 2005, Jennet wrote about how her liberal parents often argued with James Conant over U.S. military activities in Asia in during the 1960s and 70s.

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