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Top 10 Best Delay Guitar Pedals

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

Unlike the overdrive pedals we discussed before, the history of the delay effect in music doesn’t begin with a blues guitarist pushing his weak amp of the time past its comfort zone. Instead, some of the first examples of delay come from a style of French origin called Musique concrète. Beginning as a response to radio and phonographs, art commentary of the time began to speculate about the artistic effects of recorded music, which soon after became known as radiophonic art. By the late 1940s, Musique concrète was experimenting with altering the playback of recorded audio. This would also serve as the earliest foundation of electronic music.

The most common technique of that era was the tape loop echo delay, which was achieved by physically lengthening or shortening the loop of tape during playback. Audio engineers quickly took notice of the practice and used it as a studio secret to augment the effect they got from plate reverb. Because the music world is ultimately a small one, and audio engineers tend to be complete music geeks who are interested in everything, it wasn’t long before the technique caught on in popular music. Les Paul’s tinkering eventually led to the Ray Butts EchoSonic, which was an amplifier with a built-in tape echo that was popular in both country and rock and roll. Next came the Echoplex and the rest is history.

The simple explanation of delay is that it creates a layered output of repeating sounds to enhance the depth and texture of any recording. It’s usually the effect making an arena-rock solo sound as massive as it does, often having the impression of multiple guitars playing at once. It’s also invaluable in post-rock; try to imagine any Explosions in the Sky song without delay. No matter what style of music, a well-placed delay will add that extra detail that makes for a truly great recording.

To that end, virtually all recordings you hear now feature delay in some form or another. Even if the guitarist in question doesn’t like delay as an effect, chances are good that the song they’re recording on features at least two tracks of their guitar with one of them delayed by microseconds, which creates a doubling effect. This produces a rich, saturated output that shines in professional recordings. Basically, delay is invaluable.

Delay is also an incredible creative tool. Guitarists that spend the time picking out their favorite delay and tweaking the settings to perfectly accentuate their rig are often rewarded with a signature sound. No two guitarists will have exactly the same settings, even given the popularity of a given pedal. And since delay can be timed exactly to the beat of the song, it also enhances the timing of the band as a whole. Some bands, when they play live, run a signal from the guitarist’s pre-set delay pedal right to the in-ear monitor of the drummer in order to keep exactly perfect timing in often and confusing settings.

As with all pedals, there are a baffling number of delays to choose from. The high-end units of today give you access to the entire history of delay pedals, including emulating the very first tape loop echoes that gave life to the effect. Some are much simpler and let you easily repeat notes to add just a sparkling of detail to your playing. When choosing a pedal, you’ll want to pay attention to a few choices you’ll have to make. For each of the pedals on our list, we’ve indicated what the pedal has to help you choose.

  • What type of delay?
    If you want to emulate the old school, warm and warble-y stuff, you’ll want to go analog. If you want crystal-clear, exact replicas of your notes, go with digital. You don’t have to choose, though. Lots of pedals have both as you’ll see, and lots of players, including me, use one of each, often at the same time.
  • How long is the delay?
    Delays are usually measured in milliseconds, which reflects the amount of time between each repeat. Most people end up using a medium-short repeat, probably in the 300 millisecond range. If you want your repeats to wait forever and a day, choose delays with longer times. Country pickers like short, slap delays, and experimental music tends to use extremely long delays, as a guideline.
  • Do you need a tap tempo?
    For perfectionists and prog rockers, tap tempo is essential. This is a button on the pedal that allows you to tap out the beat of the song, so that your delays line up perfectly with each beat. If you’re more into the experimental or textured recordings, you might be able to skip it and rely on your ability to turn the knob.
  • Is it true bypass?
    True bypass means that within the pedal enclosure, there is a single, separate cable that runs from the input to the output jack that skips all the internal circuitry. On some delay pedals, you can hear the delay clock even when it’s turned off, while on others, you may simply get some sound degradation. On the other hand, delay pedals without true bypass almost always contain a buffer, which can be supremely handy after a long line of true bypass pedals. Buy what you like and trust your ears.

Whatever you need in a delay pedal, we’ve compiled this list of the top ten best delay guitar pedals to help you pick a great one.



1. MXR M169 Carbon Copy Analog Delay

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(MXR)

Almost as classic as its stablemate the Phase 90, the Carbon Copy has been delighting guitarists for years. This is a very simple and yet endlessly flexible pedal that relies on old fashioned bucket brigade chip technology to achieve its famously dark and captivating tone. Bucket brigade chips work by passing the analogue signal along a line of capacitors at different points in the clock cycle. You don’t really need to know what that means, but the point is that this is nearly as authentic as it gets.

For controls, you get Regen (number of repeats), Mix (effect volume), and Delay (delay time up to 600 milliseconds), as well as a Mod switch, which allows the user to introduce even more tape-like artifacts. Two internal trim pots allow adjustment of the Mod switch so you can exactly dial in the effect you want when the button is pressed.

I played this pedal for years before switching to the baby brother of the next pedal on our list. It’s important to note here that bucket brigade technology lends itself to self-oscillation, which is the effect when a delay pedal feeds back on itself endlessly, leading to a huge spike in volume. It’s extremely cool if you like turning knobs and making noise. If you don’t, spend a little time getting familiar with just how high you can have the Regen and Delay knobs before you’re into trouble territory. If you like a super-long delay, cut back on the Regen. If you like a super-long delay and play a lot of notes, you might want to consider another pedal on this list. This one is really ideal for mid-range times with medium-high Regen so you can bask in the glory of the warbling.

Also, if you find this pedal to simply be too dark, they more recently came out with the Carbon Copy Bright to address that concern.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Analog
  • Delay time: Up to 600 milliseconds
  • Tap tempo?: No
  • True bypass?: Yes

Need more options? Browse more Jim Dunlop products here.


Price: $149.99

Buy the MXR M169 Carbon Copy Analog Delay here.

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2. Earthquaker Devices Disaster Transport Sr. Delay

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(Earthquaker Devices)

When I finally relinquished the Carbon Copy I was using to its rightful owner (I’d been borrowing it the whole time), it was due to the fact that my wife bought me an EQD Disaster Transport Jr. That’s a far more simplified pedal than the one chosen for this list, but the circuit is similar. We also didn’t opt for that one because the Jr. is recently discontinued. The beastly Sr., however, lives on.

If analog delay is your thing, this might be all you ever need. According to the website, this can be used in the following ways: straight delay, straight reverb, rhythmic delay, modulated delay and old school tape-style echo. There are settings in here for every type and permutation of analog delay, all pointed directly to the old school experimental effects that began the trend.

This pedal is actually two in one. Delay A is controlled with the upper bank of knobs, which include Time (from 30 milliseconds to 600 milliseconds), Repeats (from a single repeat to self-oscillation), Mix (a gain-based control with unity at 12), Depth (modulation control), Rate (modulation speed), and Bleed (the amount it bleeds into Delay B). Both the Repeats and the Bleed are controllable through an external expression pedal. The EQD website recommends the Moog EP-2, but since that appears to be discontinued, the EP-3 may be an acceptable substitute.

Delay B is controlled with the lower bank of knobs, which include Reverb, Mix, Repeats, and Time (from 30 milliseconds to 300 milliseconds). The best approach seems to be to use Delay A as the one for exploration and discovery, while using Delay B in a more standardized, fixed configuration that generates the same amount of edlay every time. Since you can feed them into one another, you have an exceptionally wide range of sounds available. Even better, you can use one or both in either true bypass or tails mode, which gives you even more options in the context of your wider pedalboard. Choose this if you’re a sonic painter who gets bored easily.

On the other hand, the simpler and more utilitarian Dispatch Master is frequently seen on pro pedalboards, so you could give that a whirl, too.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Analog
  • Delay time: 30 milliseconds to 300 milliseconds (Delay B) or 600 milliseconds (Delay A)
  • Tap tempo?: No
  • True bypass?: Yes

Need more options? Browse more Earthquaker Devices products here.


Price: $345

Buy the Earthquaker Devices Disaster Transport Sr. Delay here.

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3. Line 6 DL4 Stompbox Delay Modeler

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(Line 6)

Among delay pedal enthusiasts, this is the king. Relying heavily on what Line 6 is known for, this unit contains carefully recreated emulations of many well-loved designs throughout pedal history. As the company points out on its website, you’d probably be hesitant to bring out your vintage, one-of-a-kind effects for a tour, and that’s where this battle-tested pedal shines. It debuted in 2000, but has become nearly ubiquitous on stage.

Controls include Model Selector (choose between 16 vintage models), Delay Time (varies by delay), Repeats, Tweak (controls one parameter of the preset), Tweez (controls a different parameter), and Mix. The models available to choose from include: Tube Echo, Tape Echo, Multi-Head, Sweep Echo, Analog Echo, Analog w/Mod, Lo Res Delay, Digital Delay, Digital w/Mod, Rhythmic Delays, Stereo Delays, Ping Pong, Reverse, Dynamic Delay, and Auto-Volume Echo. In addition to all of those, you get a 14-second loop sampler, which expands the utility of this pedal even further.

Unlike the first two on this list, this pedal comes with a tap tempo so you can set the delay time to match the beat of your track. The switches allow for using three presets, or, while in loop mode, controlling the recording and playback of the loop. The fourth switch is for the tap tempo. Most players will mess around until they have their presets in place, then rely heavily on those to get through the set. As with the Disaster Transport, you can purchase a separate expression pedal to dynamically control a given parameter while playing to add even more feel. This is a proven choice and is meant to collect a wide variety of well-known sounds and put them in one place.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Digital and analog
  • Delay time: Up to 2,500 milliseconds depending on setting
  • Tap tempo?: Yes
  • True bypass?: Yes

Need more options? Browse more Line 6 products here.


Price: $249

Buy the Line 6 DL4 Stompbox Delay Modeler here.

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4. Boss DD-3 Digital Delay

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(Boss)

If the last two pedals were a bit overwhelming, consider something simpler instead. This Boss delay is a cut-and-dry digital delay, meant to perfectly recreate your notes as many times as you like without any of the interference of analog signals. This isn’t for emulating the history of delay, but rather using it in a throughly modern context. Crisp, clean note repetition, neutral and unbiased.

You get knobs for Effect Level, Feedback (number of repeats), Delay Time (really a selector between three banks of time ranges), and Mode, which chooses the length of the delay depending on the Delay Time setting. There’s also a Hold option, which will hold your note as long as you keep the pedal depressed. Once you spend a little time with this pedal, you’ll be able to quickly dial-in the perfect setting so you can call on it for faithful note recreation.

I use the older version of this pedal, the DD-2, which has become a little bit harder to find. This is the update and works much in the same way. I use this with a longer delay time in line after the Disaster Transport Jr. set to a shorter time, so that the analog signal cascades into this one for a lush ping-pong effect. Occasionally, if I need perfect articulation, I’ll use only the Boss pedal. Some reviews complain that the DD-3 is a little cold and sterile, but to a certain degree, that’s what you want in a simple digital delay. You should get your interesting tones from other pedals and use this to simply repeat them. You can also get a DD-7, but for most folks, the simplicity of the DD-3 wins out.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Digital
  • Delay time: 12.5 milliseconds to 800 milliseconds
  • Tap tempo?: No
  • True bypass?: No

Need more options? Browse all guitar effect pedals here.


Price: $139 (includes accessory kit)

Buy the Boss DD-3 Digital Delay here.

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5. Way Huge WHE701 Aqua-Puss Analog Delay

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(Way Huge)

On the whole, Way Huge effects are aimed at the retro crowd, especially folks working in the genres of rockabilly and surf. The Aqua-Puss keeps up with that fine tradition, offering a somewhat dark vintage-style delay meant for shorter times and adding a certain depth to guitar. It’s a pretty straightforward pedal that shares a little bit with the Carbon Copy above. What’s available for sale now is a reissue, but don’t let that stop you if you like the sound.

Knobs include Delay (time), Feedback (repeats), and Blend (effect volume). Perhaps even simpler than the DD-3, this will shine a short, slapback delay times, offering up the wet tape echo of days gone by. Because the maximum delay time is only 300 milliseconds, this wouldn’t be a good choice for people who need a lot of flexibility or long, dreamy trails. If you have that specific surf rock sound in your mind, consider this option.

If you decide you love the sound of the circuit but need that extra flexibility, Way Huge also offers the Supa-Puss, which gives you up to 900 milliseconds of delay and far more control over your output. It even includes a tap tempo and note subdivision to get even more nuanced. The catch is that it retails for about $100 more, however.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Analog
  • Delay time: 20 milliseconds to 300 milliseconds
  • Tap tempo?: No
  • True bypass?: Yes

Need more options? Browse more Way Huge products here.


Price: $149.99

Buy the Way Huge WHE701 Aqua-Puss Analog Delay here.

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6. Eventide TimeFactor Twin Delay

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(Eventide)

I watch my fair share of Premier Guitar Rig Rundowns and I can tell you that this pedal and the one that follows make their appearance on a few well-outfitted pedalboards. Building off of the success of the Line 6 DL4, this Eventide model follows very closely in order to produce one of the most flexible delays ever made.

Nine delay effects combine with a 12-second looper in this powerful, dual delay unit. For knobs, you get Mix (overall effect mix), Dly Mix (from 100% Delay A to 100% Delay B), Dly Time A (time), Dly Time B, Fdbk A (repeats), and Fdbk B. Xnob, Depth, Speed, and Filter all change various parameters depending on which delay model you’re using. There’s also a knob to select the delay type, which by pushing also controls the tempo. As a major improvement on the DL4, the delay time displays on the readout. Eventide calls this delay “futureproof” since it’s upgradeable with the USB port included in it.

Even more incredible is that this pedal can be controlled via MIDI, expression pedal, or external footswitch. You get inputs and outputs for both guitar and line level, depending what you’re using it for. This is an incredibly robust option meant for the obsessively dedicated. In the guitar world today, it’s perhaps only bested by our next pick. You could spend months of your life dialing this thing in and never get bored. Fortunately for you, it comes pre-programmed with 100 presets to get you started quickly. If you need to recreate something you had in the studio, choose this option.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Digital and analog
  • Delay time: Up to 3,000 milliseconds
  • Tap tempo?: Yes
  • True bypass?: Yes

Need more options? Browse more Eventide products here.


Price: $399

Buy the Eventide TimeFactor Twin Delay here.


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7. Strymon TimeLine

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(Strymon)

If you looked at the Eventide and thought to yourself, “Hm, not bad, but what have you got in the way of…more?” then you are a madman and I applaud you. Fortunately, someone has taken it upon themselves to design a unit just for a guitar player like you who has an insatiable need to start at a tiny, tiny LED screen and turn knobs for hours at a time.

With virtually all the same controls as the Eventide with slightly different labeling, the TimeLine gives you access to 12 delay types, which include digital, dual, pattern, reverse, ice, duck, swell, trem, filter, lo-fi, d-tape and d-bucket, as well as a 30-second looper. For those of you keeping track at home, 30 seconds is enough time for almost all of Minor Threat’s “Straight Edge,” a song that clocks in at 45 seconds. A verse pattern in a pop song is unlikely to last even quite as long as this looper will let you record. All of this is immediately at your finger tips with 200 presets available when you open the package.

This unit is so advanced and powerful, it can be used in place of rack gear or software in the studio. If it’s a delay and you might use it, you’ll find it in this sleek box. The only major downside to this product is the price tag, which is not insignificant. It’s almost certainly overkill for most people, but if you want it all, it’s available to you here.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Digital and analog
  • Delay time: Up to 2,500 milliseconds
  • Tap tempo?: Yes
  • True bypass?: Yes

Need [even] more options? Browse more Strymon products here.


Price: $599

Buy the Strymon TimeLine here.

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8. Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man 1100-TT

(Electro-Harmonix)

The Memory Man is a monster in the delay world, and much like the Big Muff, there are a number of variants. Tone Report has a lovely tribute to the history and evolution of the lineage for those interested.

The currently available lineup includes the Deluxe Memory Man, Deluxe Memory Man 550-TT, Deluxe Memory Boy, the Memory Boy, and the pedalboard-friendly Memory Toy. There’s also the Stereo Memory Man with Hazarai, but to be clear, that is a digital delay. (And Hazarai just means, loosely, “all that extra junk,” in case you’re wondering.) For the latest and greatest in the evolution of the analog delay pedal known as the Memory Man, you’ll need this one, the Deluxe Memory Man 1100-TT.

This version compiles all the advancements in Memory Man design over the years, with a specific reliance on the NOS bucket brigade chips of old to achieve the long delay time. Control knobs include Blend to change the wet/dry ratio, Gain for the input gain from -13dB to +20dB, Rate for modulation speed, Depth for modulation amount, Feedback to determine the amount of signal fed back into the input, and Delay which sets the time between 52 and 1,100 milliseconds. The Tap Divide button sets the note subdivisions for shorter delays to sync with your playing. Exp. Mode sets what is controlled via the external expression pedal, mapped to one of the six inputs. The other inputs include the signal Input and Output, Send and Return for an effects loop that only colors your delayed tones, and an external tap jack input allows for the use of a momentary footswitch.

The price difference and availability of the 1100-TT in comparison to the 550-TT basically comes down to the difficulty sourcing enough of the NOS chips to build them. If you don’t need all 1,100 seconds of delay time, the 550-TT is over $100 cheaper, usually easier to find, and still employs NOS Panasonic BBD chips. The very first Memory Man only had a maximum delay time of 300ms, and if it was good enough then, it could be good enough now. As you can tell from our list, analog delays usually top out around 600ms, anyway, so you’d still be in good company.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Analog
  • Delay time: 52 to 1,100 milliseconds
  • Tap tempo?: Yes
  • True bypass?: Yes

Need more options? Browse more Electro-Harmonix products here.


Price: $358

Buy the Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man 1100-TT here.

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9. TC Electronic Flashback Mini

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(TC Electronic)

If those last few were too large for your pedalboard, this TC Electronic is a sightly different take on delay pedal architecture. Rather than having a particular sound of its own, the Flashback Mini is enabled with TonePrint, which is a completely digital recreation of any number of hundreds of delays available at no extra charge from the manufacturer’s website.

Simply edit your effect on the computer, connect via USB, and bang, you have your perfectly-modeled delay pedal in this tiny housing. Once it’s set up with the delay of your choosing, the pedal is controlled with three simple knobs: Feedback (repeats), Delay (time), and Effect Level. By giving you the extreme flexibility of an all-digital solution, you can get back some of the massive list of options available on the Eventide and Strymon, even if you’re stuck with only one of them at a time.

The price is right on this for what it gives you access to: a virtually inexhaustible catalog of delay effects. If you like to tinker but you need your board space, this is the option for you. They also make the Flashback in nano and X4 configurations, which give you more options within the pedal depending on how much you want to spend.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Digital and analog
  • Delay time: Up to 7,000 milliseconds
  • Tap tempo?: No
  • True bypass?: Yes

Need more options? Browse more TC Electronic products here.

Price: $85

Buy the TC Electronic Flashback Mini here.

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10. Old Blood Noise Endeavors Black Fountain Delay

delay pedal, guitar effect pedal, guitar pedals, guitar effects, best delay pedal, best analog delay, best digital delay

(Old Blood Noise Endeavors)

If everything we’ve shown you so far hasn’t been quite weird enough, consider another Old Blood Noise Endeavors unit. The whole company seems dedicated to the idea of wildness and weirdness, so naturally the first pedal they produced would be in this vein. If you’re looking for accurate repeats, you’ll want to return to other items on this list. If you’re looking for a distinctive voice with a high degree of control, read on.

The Black Fountain was created to follow in the footsteps of the Morley EDL, Tel-Ray Model 10 and Fender Echo-Reverb — so-called “oil can” delay units. This pedal includes controls for Time, Feedback, Mix, and Fluid, which adjusts the amount of wobble in the delay. Basically, Fluid is the thing you want to focus on if making something sound weird is your jam. There’s also a switch for choosing between Modern, Vintage, and Organ circuits. The Modern and Vintage are very similar, but Vintage introduces more noisy artifacts that emulate older units. The Organ circuit is a short delay effect and can also be used as a spring tank reverb.

If you’re looking to get some of the analog strangeness of vintage units but the tape effect emulators aren’t cutting it for you, try this unit. It will introduce a delightful and delightfully weird element to your tone.


Specs:

  • Delay type: Analog
  • Delay time: Up to 211 milliseconds in Organ Mode, up to 800 milliseconds in Modern and Vintage Modes
  • Tap tempo?: No
  • True bypass?: No

Need more options? Browse more Old Blood Noise Endeavors products here.


Price: $199

Buy the Old Blood Noise Endeavors Black Fountain Delay here.

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Other Delay Options

Eventide also makes a multi-effect pedal called the Harmonizer H9 ($499) that will give you access to much of the delay goodness in the TimeFactor, in addition to a wide variety of other effects. The footprint is smaller, too.

To go the opposite direction, if you just want to experiment or practice with delay before diving into any of the pricey options above, the Behringer Vintage Delay ($24.99) is a perfectly serviceable unit known to surprise even seasoned pedal veterans with its quality.

If nothing you saw here will work for you, browse all guitar effect pedals here to find that perfect delay pedal. If it’s price you’re worried about, check out our list of the top 15 best cheap guitar effect pedals.

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Heavy, Inc. is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to Amazon. Our product recommendations are guided solely by our editors. We have no relationship with manufacturers.

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1 comment

  1. T. C. Electronic “Flashback”.
    You should review this one. I have a lot of experience with this delay pedal, it’d be tough to beat the features and sound quality of this one for the price.