How Many Popular Votes Did Clinton & Trump Win in Each State?
Search Heavy

How Many Popular Votes Did Clinton & Trump Win in Each State?

Donald Trump rally, Donald Trump iowa rally, Donald Trump sioux city rally

Donald Trump holds a campaign rally in Sioux City, Iowa. (Getty)

Donald Trump has been elected president of the United States, but Hillary Clinton is expected to win the popular vote.

Trump was able to pull off the most stunning upset in American political history thanks to the states of Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan, but it also helped that Hillary Clinton lost millions of votes that Obama won in 2008 and 2012.

The result in Pennsylvania was particularly surprising, and Trump won about 80,000 more votes there than Barack Obama did in 2012. Trump also took the state of Wisconsin, even though nobody thought of it as being a potential swing state even a week ago. The Republican candidate won the state with 47.9 percent of the vote, though this falls short of Obama’s decisive victory in the state in 2012, when he earned 52.8 percent of the vote.

In total, Hillary Clinton won 59,739,748 votes, while Donald Trump won 59,521,401 votes. Ballots are still being counted, though, so it’s highly possible Clinton’s margin over Trump will wind up being even higher than that.

Here are the number of popular votes cast in each state, via data from The New York Times.

STATE Donald Trump Hillary Clinton
Alabama 1,306,925 (62.9%) 718,084 (34.6%)
Alaska 130,415 (52.9%) 93,007 (37.7%)
Arizona 1,021,154 (49.5%) 936,250 (45.4%)
Arkansas 677,904 (60.4%) 378,729 (33.8%)
California 3,916,209 (32.8%) 7,362,490 (61.6%)
Colorado 1,137,455 (44.4%) 1,212,209 (47.3%)
Connecticut 668,266 (41.2%) 884,432 (54.5%)
Delaware 185,103 (41.9%) 235,581 (53.4%)
Florida 4,605,515 (49.1%) 4,485,745 (47.8%)
Georgia 2,068,623 (51.3%) 1,837,300 (45.6%)
Hawaii 128,815 (30.0%) 266,827 (62.2%)
Idaho 407,199 (59.2%) 189,677 (27.6%)
Illinois 2,118,179 (39.4%) 2,977,498 (55.4%)
Indiana 1,556,220 (57.2%) 1,031,953 (37.9%)
Iowa 798,923 (51.8%) 650,790 (42.2%)
Kansas 656,009 (57.2%) 414,788 (36.2%)
Kentucky 1,202,942 (62.5%) 628,834 (32.7%)
Louisiana 1,178,004 (58.1%) 779,535 (38.4%)
Maine 334,838 (45.2%) 354,873 (47.9%)
Maryland 873,646 (35.3%) 1,497,951 (60.5%)
Massachusetts 1,083,069 (33.5%) 1,964,768 (60.8%)
Michigan 2,279,805 (47.6%) 2,268,193 (47.3%)
Minnesota 1,322,891 (45.4%) 1,366,676 (46.9%)
Mississippi 678,457 (58.3%) 462,001 (39.7%)
Missouri 1,585,753 (57.1%) 1,054,889 (38.0%)
Montana 274,120 (56.5%) 174,521 (36.0%)
Nebraska 485,819 (60.3%) 273,858 (34.0%)
Nevada 511,319 (45.3%) 537,753 (47.9%)
New Hampshire 345,789 (47.3%) 348,521 (47.6%)
New Jersey 1,535,513 (41.8%) 2,021,756 (55.0%)
New Mexico 315,875 (40.0%) 380,724 (48.3%)
New York 2,640,570 (37.5%) 4,143,874 (58.8%)
North Carolina 2,339,603 (50.5%) 2,162,074 (46.7%)
North Dakota 216,133 (64.1%) 93,526 (27.8%)
Ohio 2,771,984 (52.1%) 2,317,001 (43.5%)
Oklahoma 947,934 (65.3%) 419,788 (28.9%)
Oregon 742,506 (41.1%) 934,631 (51.7%)
Pennsylvania 2,912,941 (48.8%) 2,844,705 (47.6%)
Rhode Island 179,421 (39.8%) 249,902 (55.4%)
South Carolina 1,143,611 (54.9%) 849,469 (40.8%)
South Dakota 227,701 (61.5%) 117,442 (31.7%)
Tennessee 1,517,402 (61.1%) 867,110 (34.9%)
Texas 4,681,590 (52.6%) 3,867,816 (43.4%)
Utah 452,086 (45.9%) 274,188 (27.8%)
Vermont 95,053 (32.6%) 178,179 (61.1%)
Virginia 1,731,155 (45.0%) 1,916,845 (49.9%)
Washington 1,129,120 (38.2%) 1,610,524 (54.4%)
West Virginia 486,198 (68.7%) 187,457 (26.5%)
Wisconsin 1,403,694 (47.8%) 1,380,823 (47.0%)
Wyoming 174,248 (70.1%) 55,949 (22.5%)
82 Comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

82 Comments

Gail Ruff

Clinton lost because she didn’t visit WI and OH. Boo boo What are they, 5-year-olds? $&@?!! Oh right, that’s their president.

Reply
Anonymous

the day is coming when the illegal voters in California will be a majority in that state and they vote to take your property, wealth and rights from you.

Reply
Leigh

Good God. As someone who has lived in California for nearly 30 years. I cannot imagine how anyone could come up with that…may I ask what state you are from?

Reply
Anonymous

Thank God for the Electoral College. It saved our great nation from The Clinton’s/Obama nightmare

Reply
Anonymous

The Electoral College was created to even the playing field. In colonial times, the fear was New York City, Philadelphia and Boston would decide who would be President at the expense of the other 10 States. Today, California, New York and a handful of other States could do so if the Electoral College is replace by a popular vote Winner Take All system. I’m from Alabama, but California has been my home since attending the University of San Francisco. I guarantee you that what matters to Californians is VERY different than what matters to the friends I grew up with. What’s fair? Does California represent “average American” more than Alabama? In my mind the system’s doing exactly what it was intended to do. (And no, I didn’t vote for Trump OR Hillary.)

Reply
George

California IS the reason Hillary won the popular vote. Just goes to show how crazy the Golden State has become.Too bad. California use to be a great state. The left has ruined it.
The latest proof of the insanity that IS California has their taxpayers paying for a sex change operation of a convicted murderer!

Reply
allessior

A simple pareto analysis shows that Trump won the popular vote in most states. It was primarily liberal NY (and likely mostly the borough of Manhatten) that gave Clinton the overall lead in the popular vote, but its obvious that Trump won the popular vote in most stares.

Reply
Alessio Ventura

A simple pareto analysis demonstrates that Trump won the popular vote in most states and it was primarily liberal New York (and likely mostly the borough of Manhatten) that amounted for Clinton’s overall lead in the popular vote.

Reply
Leigh

Oh, dear. Congress – the House of Representatives and the Senate – run the country. The President has veto power – which can be overruled – and is the face of the U.S. abroad. It’s astonishing this is not taught in school. I hate to be insulting, but I absolutely cannot imagine how people on this site do not understand the most basic things about our government.

Reply
Leigh

Also, California may vote on leaving the U.S. in 2018! Legally, it might not be possible. I think most of the people on this site would be glad. We would be, too.

Reply
Discuss on Facebook