Robert E. Lee Charlottesville Statue: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Robert E. Lee Charlottesville, Robert E. Lee Charlottesville statue, Unite the Right protest cause Getty

Virginia state police in front of the Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, where white nationalists organized a "Unite The Right" rally.

Charlottesville, Virginia is the site of this weekend’s “Unite The Right” rally, an event that drew white nationalists from all over the country to the city. Since April 2017, when the Charlottesville City Council first voted to remove a bronze equestrian Robert E. Lee sculpture, the city has been the site of alt-right protests and a Ku Klux Klan rally.

Robert E. Lee was a Confederate general during the Civil War and was the general who surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox in 1865. Lee lived until 1870, dying at age 63. Statues of Lee were erected throughout the South and the movement to remove them was sparked by the 2015 killings of nine black churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina by a white supremacist.

On Saturday, one person was killed and dozens injured when a car hit a crowd of counter-protesters after the “Unite The Right” rally was cancelled by officials. A suspect was taken into custody, the Virginia Secretary of Public Safety confirmed. Two police officers were also killed in a police helicopter crash.

Here’s what you need to know about the statue that drew white nationalists to Charlottesville.


1. The City Council Voted to Remove the Statue in April, but a Judge Halted the Removal for 6 Months in May

Robert E. Lee Charlottesville, Robert E. Lee Charlottesville statue, Unite the Right protest cause

GettyKu Klux Klan members at the July 8 rally at the Robert E. Lee Statue.

In April, the Charlottesville City Council voted to sell the bronze statue that stands in downtown Charlottesville. As WVIR reports, the city council also unanimously voted to rename Lee Park. However, two members of the five-member city council still voted against removing the statue.

At the time, City Attorney Craig Brown admitted that there would be legal battles ahead to remove the statue.

“There is a pending court suit challenging the right to relocate the Lee statue,” Brown told Richmond.com. “I think the process is geared toward a contractual agreement to move the statue somewhere else, but my advice is to have that be contingent on a favorable ruling in the court case.”

In May, WDBJ reported that Judge Richard Moore ruled that the statue’s removal would be delayed by six months. The Sons of Confederate Veterans and other groups argued that a Virginia monument law stops war monuments from being removed. However, the city government said that the statue of Lee and another one of the Confederate General Stonewall Jackson were not initially erected to honor Civil War veterans.

Moore said that the city could still rename Lee and Jackson parks, and could continue plans to remove the Lee statue, as well as plans to replace them with other historical monuments. One idea is to build a memorial to the slaves who lived in Charlottesville in Jackson Park, notes the Daily Progress.

Lee Park was renamed Emancipation Park, while Jackson Park’s new name is Justice Park.


2. The First Torch-Wielding Protest at Charlottesville Took Place on May 13 With Richard Spencer

Robert E. Lee Charlottesville, Robert E. Lee Charlottesville statue, Unite the Right protest cause

GettyPolice standing in riot gear around the statue on August 12.

This weekend’s rally is not the first time alt-right leader and white nationalist Richard Spencer and others have protested at Charlottesville. As The Daily Progress reported, he led a torch-wielding rally on May 13.

“We will not be replaced from this park,” Spencer told the crowd in May, CBS News notes. “We will not be replaced from this world. Whites have a future. We have a future of power, of beauty, of expression,”

Spencer was born in Boston, but attended the University of Virginia.

Charlottesville Mayor Mike Singer called the May protest “either profoundly ignorant or was designed to instill fear in our minority populations in a way that hearkens back to the days of the KKK. Either way, as mayor of this city, I want everyone to know this: we reject this intimidation. We are a welcoming city, but such intolerance is not welcome here.”

Erich Reimer, the chair of the Charlottesville Republican Party, said the “intolerance and hatred they seek to promote is utterly disgusting and disturbing beyond words.”

On July 8, about 50 members of a Ku Klux Klan group from North Carolina held a rally near the statue, but they were outnumbered by about 1,000 counter-protesters. Twenty-two people were attested at that rally.

“The NAACP has committed to removing and advocating the removal of Confederate symbols, including statues and from flags in cities all around the nation,” the NAACP said in a statement after the July rally. “In Charlottesville, they continue to support the call to remove the statue of Robert E. Lee.”


3. The Statue Was Commissioned Over 50 Years After the Civil War Ended

Robert E. Lee Charlottesville, Robert E. Lee Charlottesville statue, Unite the Right protest cause

GettyCounter-protesters on August 12.

The Robert E. Lee Statue isn’t something that was built when Virginia was a member of the Confederate States of America. It wasn’t even built in the years after the Civil War. The statue was commissioned in 1917, 52 years after the war ended, and was finally erected in 1924, 59 years after the war ended.

According to the Department of the Interior, the statue was commissioned in 1917 by the National Sculpture Society and philanthropist Paul Goodloe McIntire. Henry Shrady designed the statue, but died before it was finished. Leo Lentelli finished it in 1924 and it was cast at the Roman Bronze Works in Brooklyn, New York.

The statue stands 26 feet high. It joined the list of the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.


4. It’s Estimated That the Removal of the Statues of Lee & Jackson Could Cost the City $700,000

Robert E. Lee Charlottesville, Robert E. Lee Charlottesville statue, Unite the Right protest cause

GettyThe nearby Sronewall Jackson statue.

Removing the statues of Lee and Jackson will not come cheap. In October 2016, Richmond.com reported that city staff estimate that it will cost $330,000 to remove the Lee statue and $370,000 to remove the Jackson one.

The Thomas Jonathan Jackson Statue was also commissioned by McIntire and is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was erected in 1921.

McIntire was a wealthy philanthropist whose name is all over the University of Virginia. As C-Ville.com reported in 2016, McIntire donated four parks to Charlottesville, supported the city’s first library and UVA’s McIntire Park, McIntire School of Commerce and McIntire Amphitheatre are all named for him.

While McIntire donated sculptures of two Confederate generals, one of the four parks he donated was named after Booker T. Washington and planned as a “playground for the colored citizens of Charlottesville.” The two other statues he donated are of Lewis and Clark and George Rogers Clark. The Charlottesville Regional Center even named an award, the Paul Goodloe McIntire Citizenship Award, after him in 1975.

McIntire, who was born in Charlottesville, lived from 1860 to 1952.


5. There Are Over 1,000 Confederate Monuments in 31 States, Including Some not Involved in the Civil War

Robert E. Lee Charlottesville, Robert E. Lee Charlottesville statue, Unite the Right protest cause

GettyCounter-protesters on August 12.

Since the 2015 shooting of nine black churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina by a white supremacist, city and state legislatures across the country have been rethinking their Confederate memorials. As USA Today noted in May, there are over 1,000 Confederate monuments in 31 states, including some that weren’t even involved in the Civil War.

For example, USA Today noted that there is the Confederate Memorial Fountain in Helena, Montana. But Montana wasn’t even a state at the time of the Civil War.

In addition, many of the monuments aren’t that old. University of North Carolina survey found that 35 monuments in the state have been built since 2000. WRAL reported that 70 North Carolina counties have at least one Confederate monument, and 17 have more than one.

Levar Stoney, the mayor of Virginia’s capital Richmond, said in a June press conference that he doesn’t want his city’s Confederate statues removed. Instead, he’d like to see historical context added. Richmond has five Confederate statues along Monument Avenue.

“Equal parts myth and deception, they were the ‘alternative facts’ of their time — a false narrative etched in stone and bronze more than 100 years ago — not only to lionize the architects and defenders of slavery, but to perpetuate the tyranny and terror of Jim Crow and reassert a new era of white supremacy,” the mayor, a 35-year-old African-American who previously worked for Governor Terry McAuliffe, said in June. However, he added that future statues should reflect the diversity of the city.

However, Stoney has since changed his position. On August 16, he tweeted that the Monument Avenue Commission will “include examination of removal and/or relocation of some or all confederate statues.”

124 Comments

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124 Comments

Guienevefe

Know your history – Robert E. Lee did not want to fight for the South. He eventually chose to do such because he did not wish to fight against his own family. Hate groups should not make us erase history because they incorrectly pick a symbol. We should learn from our mistakes and educate. If statues are to be moved; put them in a museum – if for no other reason than the pieces of art that they are.

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Jimbo99

“For example, USA Today noted that there is the Confederate Memorial Fountain in Helena, Montana. But Montana wasn’t even a state at the time of the Civil War.”

After losing the Civil War, it’s where they relocated. Watch Outlaw Josey Wales, the one’s that never surrendered went West fought Mexicans and Indians. Some thought they would get far enough away from the US Government, at least in their lifetimes.The Louisiana Purchase was a vast amount of land, but not all inclusive to the West coast of North America up to Canada & Mexico as we know it today.

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Anonymous

The statues should stay. They represent our history, and actually are wonderful works of art. Leave monuments where they are and go about addressing the real problems in Charlottesville, Va., like poverty, and homelessness.

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Anonymous

DNA has proven that Thomas Jefferson raped one of his female slaves and she had his kid. I guess it would also cost too much to make a list of all of the women that Thomas Jefferson raped and how many People are actually related to him.Maybe we could make a list of the hundreds of slaves that George Washington owned and we can make a nice plaque to put on the front door of his estate. Or you can just quit being a douchebag.

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Anonymous

The Confederacy was never a part of the United States of America. Tear them all down, and don’t look back.

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Anonymous

President Lincoln thought so highly of Robert E. Lee that he asked him to be the general of the Union army. Lee politely declined stating that he would never fight against his Virginian brothers.

The War Between the States was about the right of the states to govern themselves. If you don’t believe me then do the necessary research to learn the truth. The demonstrators do not represent the vast majority of the people who want the statue to remain untouched.

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lukasiwicz

Anonymous, unfortunately the right the states wantyed to retain was that of holding other human beings as property, slaves. That was the focal issue, whether the states that wanted to govern themselves would be allowed to maintain the institution of slavery. It is disingenuous of you to maintain otherwise.

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Mat

That is a myth, generated by yankees, to justify the horrific actions of one General Sherman. The steam engine was already starting to replace manual labor. IF it were about slavery, the south would have accepted the Corwin amendment. Lincoln inauguration contradicts your hayseed hypothesis, as does dozens of other official government documents. The creation of West Virginia was also highly illegal, yet it gave the yankees the votes they needed to screw the south every which way but loose. I seriously doubt you know your A from a hole in the ground, when it comes to US history.
Hell, you probably still believe airliners hit the twin towers. If you do, then explain how it’s physically possible for an aluminum projectile to cut through a larger piece of structural steel, at subsonic speed. There is no example of such absurd BS, b/c that not the way Newtonian physics works.
PS Newtonian physics passed the SCIENTIFIC METHOD five centuries ago, that includes the theory stage. Even teens, 150yrs ago, knew cannon balls bounced off ironclad ships.

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lukasiwicz

The mere fact that the Corwin Amendment to the Constitution, which would have forbidden the federal government from meddling in the affairs of individual states, including trying to modify or abolish the institution of slavery, was ever proposed as a means for avoiding the American Civil War, is evidence that the issue of slavery was a prime cause of the war, or at least was seen as being such by those who proposed the amendment. The idea was, “If we let the Southern states keep their slaves, there will be no reason for them to fight.” If the South did not accept the proposed amendment, which in any case was eventually withdrawn, it is likely because the Southern leaders thought they could win the war. They didn’t win. It’s time to move on, but I have no problem with memorializing those who supported the Southern cause. Such memorials are all they have left,

As for airliners hitting the Twin Towers, I, and millions of others, saw them do so, in real time. Or is it your loony-toons contention that what we all saw on TV that morning was CGI?

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jlird808

“The steam engine was already starting to replace manual labor”

LOL….the steam engine had no impact on agricultural labor forces, or domestic servitude. Were there steam powered robots harvesting fields, or cooking breakfast for rich plantation owners we don’t know about??

Stop defending Nazis.

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Micheal

I believe that this is all nonsense the statue has been been there for a long time. From what I understand the white nationalist where aloud to protest and when asked to leave they did. The trouble only started after the black lives matter members showed up. No matter how many statues are moved history will not change and I feel the people who want them moved will never be satisfied. Leave them be

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Carol Ard

General Lee was more than in the civil war..He and his horse rode in the Mexican war before that and his wife was a Great Granddaughter of Martha Washington who was for educating and freeing her slaves….. Gen Lee was also related to Abe Lincoln..I believe these statues are part of history and should stay where they are Many of Gen Lees sons and grandsons as well as Great Grandsons fought in wars and some died like in the second WW…..No one knows the history of a man until they study it….

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Anonymous

Sounds good. Relocate it to a Civil War Museum along with a well-written description of historical facts. We are all Americans! This is the greatest country in the world!

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Anonymous

Saying a statue should stay has no bearing on whether someone supports white supremacy. White supremacy or any form of raciscm has no place here, including BLM, which is a racist movement. But this statue is history and for a lot more than just the Civil War. He was a general, having earned it BEFORE then, arguably the best strategist in the US military, he fought on several fronts during various confrontations. This is history, you can’t rewrite history because you don’t like it. This isn’t a slavery statue just because blacks attribute it to slavery. A statue to slavery, I would agree with moving, this is not that.

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Micheal

I want it to say also ,these communist will destroy everything in this country that they disagree with if we let them.

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Anonymous

Just wondering if anyone has considered that statues of Confederates probably could not be put up in a Southern state during Reconstruction? I’m thinking a variety of reasons would have made it virtually impossible.

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Ben Aiken

One Confederate Monument that will never be torn down is in Belle Chasse, LA and is dedicated to Judah P. Benjamin. Why this is so is the Rosetta Stone to this modern debate.

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Adam Fifth

Robert E. Lee was an honorable man and respected military leader, though his cause was questionable in the eyes of many Americans. He died peacefully in Virginia in 1870 and is buried on the grounds of Washington and Lee University, where he spent the last five years of his life serving very honorably as the university’s president. He was a fully pardoned US citizen as were all former Confederate veterans, except Henry Wirtz, commander of Andersonville Prison who was was later hanged for war crimes. Lee had nothing do with the introduction of slavery in the US nor was he a proponent of it. He had even less to do with the Charleston murders and had absolutely no connection with Dylann Roof, who was a demented young white male whose terrible actions can never be explained or excused. Connecting Robert E. Lee’s statue with Roof’s atrocious crime is an incomprehensible stretch of human imagination. Roof was born and raised in South Carolina and there is no evidence that he ever even visited Charlottesville VA, much less having been influenced by Lee’s statue to become a “white supremacist,” whatever that term is supposed to mean. He was an avowed neo-Nazi more inspired by the explosive publicity generated by the Treyvon Martin shooting (Wikipedia) than he was by the presence of a lifeless, equestrian statue of a long dead Civil War general four hundred miles away. Better to study and understand events than to make broad brushed free associations that have no bearing on reality.

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Peter Ermish

I am sorry Adam but Lee was the leading military commander of a political state ( the Confederacy) that existed to perpetuate a slave empire. There is simply no way around that fact. He was educated by the United States to which he swore an oath as an officer of the U.S. Army. Given the choice, he betrayed that oath and chose loyalty to his state instead. He was a dynamic field commander in engagements on Virginia soil but he had no understanding whatsoever of the larger strategic objectives of either side. He refused to support southern armies in the west because he did not to weaken the defense of Virginia. And so, he condemned the Confedarcy to losing the west and losing the war. His two invasions of the north showed a blind, erroneous belief in himself and his troops which sealed the southern defeat in the east. He lost the west, he lost the east. He was a bad General who served a despicable cause. I see nothing admirable in this man. He was lionized by people who could not accept their ignomous defeat or the immoral cause for which they first went to war. I would love to see all these Lee statues replaced by memorials to the man who won the west, won the east and saved America in the process. U.S. Grant. I know that won’t happen but, at least, I can rejoice in the end of the Robert E. Lee shameful,hoax.

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CJ

Lee was a brilliant military tactician – defeated every general the North threw at him until Grant. He just wasn’t the best strategist. He definitely wasn’t a *bad* general.

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DonCenTx

Clearly the most responsible organization in this tragedy is the NAACP which, once an organization for good, has become the most racist organization in the country!

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F. Snowy

Enough with your stupid history. Geez….. these people who just insist on living more and more in the PAST becasuse they cannot accept the changes of the present nor anticipate a future that doesn’t feel all warm and fuzzy and familiar. Read a book. A current scholarly non-fiction book about the real world and how we need to change our views to make resources available and keep safe and peaceful. Ignorance and glory-dazing isn’t going to do it. It seems that many of you (y’all) are terrified at the idea of adjusting your minds and your learning a thing or two. These typical “conservatives” are short-sighted and quite UN-christian in the true sense of the meaning. Symbols of oppression hurt others. Your history is a corrupted story told to you as a comforting bedtime story.

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Kyle

Speaking of people who insist on living in the past, black people reeeeeaaalllllyyyyy need to get over slavery, especially since not a single black alive in this country has ever been a slave nor ever known anyone who owned a slave. By the way, many of those who marched to protect the Robert E Lee statue don’t even identify as Christians. You really should stop making gross generalizations about conservatives, a lot of them are atheists (including myself).

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jlird808

Well he said that they were acting very UN-Christian, so you you sort of supported his argument.

And lol while no black person alive had to endure slavery, they still endure racism, and MANY are still alive who remember the Jim Crow deeply segregated south.

Southerners need to find something else to take pride in besides their racist past. YOU LOST THE WAR. Look at Germany, they moved on from their fcked up sh*t.

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Renee

SO who was the mayor other than a “35 year old African American”. Good work you are so certain to get his race but not his name. Oh but you forgot to mention Gov. Terry McAuliffe.

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Carol H. Crawford

I don’t agree with the violence that happened in Charlottesville, but what right does anyone have to take down any statues? They are part of history. Leave them alone. I have read about the lives of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. I think they were great men and are definitely a part of our history.

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Alessandro Guardamagna

In some cases the removal of monuments erected in the past because they offend our feelings and sensibility appears bizarre to say the least.

Lee’s family owned slaves and George Washington had slaves throughout his life. General Sherman, who with his warfare of property destruction and psychological terror through Georgia and the Carolinas in 1864-65 gave a key contribution in accelerating the defeat of the Confederacy when his virtually unopposed armies freed tens of thousands of slaves, strongly opposed the enlistment of black soldiers, though he was in favour of using blacks as mere labourers, which he did. When asked if former slaves should be given the right to vote after the war, he dismissively replied that he had “an opinion” about that. If we applied the same logic which wants the removal of Lee’s statue in Charlottesville, why don’t we ask for the elimination of all the statues of Washington and Sherman in the United States, starting from those in the capital and in New York? Once this is done, we might want to continue with those of U.S. Grant, who successfully defended the Union and its rights during the Civil War, but also endorsed a policy of genocide against Native Americans in the West when he got the presidency. That’s should be the way to do things if we really want to totally cleanse our past history of its mistakes.

History is a contested ground, but if one, though inspired by high and righteous principles like the one that all men are born equal, thinks that the public space must be sanitized of monuments seen as oppressive symbols of racial hatred, juts because he looks at past history through the lenses of his modern experience and sensibility, then he is leaving reason for dangerous manipulations of that history he’s like to rewrite.

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Anonymous

Well said Alessandro, for if we forget our history, history is bound to repeat itself.

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Opinion9

“Levar Stoney, the mayor of Virginia’s capital Richmond, said in a June press conference that he doesn’t want his city’s Confederate statues removed. Instead, he’d like to see historical context added.”

Instead of adding historical context to the monuments, the monuments should be moved to somewhere where they can be viewed in a strictly historical context. How about Civil War battlefields?

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Capt. Mitch

Robert E Lee and his statue do not represent racism in any way. General Lee is a Virginia son and all statues are historical landmarks, not to be voted up or down by any group of temporary elected officials in one horse towns. I don’t support white supremacy or the KKK but, leave historical landmarks, art work and statues alone.

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JOHN MAYOR - A.K.A., RICHARM M. NIXON, ROBERT LEE'S HORSE, SOME GUY DOWN THE STREET, HOMER SIMPSON, ADOLF HITLER, KIM JUNG-UN, AND GEORGE W. BUSH

The supporters of Robert E. Lee… and his statue!… are S-O-C-I-O-P-S-Y-C-H-O-P-A-T-H-S!
.
Please!… no emails!… Jesus is Lord!
.
P.S.: AND NO!… I don’t believe– FOR A MOMENT!– that Lukasiwicz, or Conway Redding, are descendants of slaves! In fact!… I believe that the just aforesaid is ONE AND THE SAME, G-O-O-F! Indeed!… the VERY SAME G-O-O-F who is using yet other names within this thread!

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Conway Redding

I just want to assure whomever believes that, Conway Redding, a.k.a. lukasiwicz is not a descendant of slaves, to check out my picture on Facebook. I suspect, however, that whomsoever thus doubts my slave heritage is so locked into thinking that all people who are phenotypically “black” must think/feel a certain way, that that person will find some reason to doubt that my picture on Facebook is really mine, and I know that arguing with arrant stupidity is a waste of time. By the way, Lee’s Horse, Some Guy Down the Street, Homer Simpson, Kim Jung-Un and George W. Bush have all simply copied and reposted my original comment, and they may indeed all be the same person, but that person is not I.

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Dolph Ramey

Ya think maybe some folks from the South ended up in Montana and decided to honor that heritage/history? Oh, that’s right: Logic has no place in libtard discourse.

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Eebroo

Robert E. Lee may have fought on the side of the Confederacy, but he is recognissed as one of the great military leaders and a pivotoal figure in 19th Century American history – people should have been able to anticipate that many Americans were going to be dismayed at the removal of a statue of him.

In the U.K, Politically correct activists at Oxford University campaigned to have the statue of the famed Imperialist Cecil Rhodes removed. However in 2016, unlike the Charlottesville Council, Oxford University considered the views of all and decided that the statue should stay, its historical significance outweighing the rather pathetic whining of a handful of millennials.

The white Americans who demonstrated in Charlottesville feel marginalised and the fact their local council feels completely comfortable in removing the Lee statue did nothing to alleviate their fears.
The statues should stay & the renaming of facilities to satisfy polititcal correct sensibilities needs to stop.

Also, the news media have to do a better job – there were two angry forces opposing each other not violent white supremacists versus ‘peaceful protestors’. The way the media, Fox, CNN & the BBC have almost ignored the existence of Antifa in Charlottesville again will do nothing for race relations.
Trump was correct to attribute blame to ‘many sides’ and shame on the likes of Rubio & Cruz who are weighing in only to further their own damaged political careers.

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Anonymous

History is history, just because we put some statues down ; now we can pretend never happened , just live them where they are as a reminder the we never reaped the same mistake,

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ButchCassidy

Americans need to learn to keep the truth of their history and not distort it for political gain or argument.
Both Robert E Lee or Thomas Jackson owned slaves and both were uncomfortable with slavery on morale grounds.
Both fought with great courage for the United States prior to the civil war and both choose to defend their state, not with a desire to protect slavery but from what they deemed as their right to suceed from the union.
People want their memory erased because it is no longer politically correct to remember that they these americans fought on the side that endorsed slavery even though 95% of those who actually fought for the confederacy had never owned a slave at all!
That 95% were fighting for what they believed was their states rights to suceed from the union and delcare a new republic.
Which neatly brings one onto the revolutionary war.
Washington was a well known slave owner along with over 40 other signers of the Declaration of Independence, so should Americans not be removing their statues and references to the deceleration of independence from the history books?
In fact slavery was rife in the 13 colonies but Britain was already moving to eradicate it from its empire by the time of the revolutionary war, so should Americans not remove all traces of the revolutionary war because some who fought in that war were slave owners, or was it again just 5% to 10% slave owners with 90% plus fighting for their right to declare a republic?
After all if the Americans had lost the war of independance then slavery would have been removed from the continent some 30 plus years before the civil war even began!
History is fact and distorting those facts is not history it’s propaganda and whilst the facts may not always be pallitable they are none the less the facts, so we must learn from history and not destroy histories truth with lies, misdirection and prejudice.

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koch andrea

it reminds me of the left and right wing extremist demonstrations which regularly take place in my home country germany these days – .from the photos and videos i can see that the americans clashing in charlottesville are mostly white young males on both sides of the spectrum. there is an increasing number of white young people full of rage in germany and the usa these days. i even saw a german flag amongst the left wing protesters in charlottesville and read that there is an “antifa” demonstrating there. what is iit that makes these young people left and right so angry ? it cannot be slavery. slavery is long gone.

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Carl Peterson

Robert E. Lee was not merely a general of the Confederacy, which he joined only with grave misgivings. He was the scion of virtually every leading family of our first state, the kinsman of Washington and of Richard Henry Lee who offered the motion for American independence in the Continental Congress. The Lees rank with the Adamses, the Roosevelts, and the Kennedys as families who have contributed disproportionately to the history, not of the Confederacy, but of the United States. If we trash such leaders as these, we will surely wind up with only trash for leaders.

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Anonymous

“. . . we will surely wind up with only trash for leaders”: Haven’t we already?

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Anonymous

I don’t live anywhere near there, but why in the world are they making such a BIG DEAL about taking down a statue. History is history — leave it alone.

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ROBERT LEE'S HORSE

As a descendant of slaves, I have no problem with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain facts of American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments constitute constant, and, I think, needed reminder. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense, which tends to stifle honest discourse, has gone on long enough.

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SOME GUY DOWN THE STREET

As a descendant of slaves, I’ve no problem with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain true facts of American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments constitute constant, and, I think, needed reminders. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense, which tends to stifle honest discourse, has gone on long enough.

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HOMER SIMPSON

As a descendant of slaves, I have no problem with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain true facts of American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments constitute constant, and, I think, needed reminders. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense, which tends to stifle honest discourse, has gone on long enough.

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ADOLF HITLER

As a descendant of slaves, I have no problem with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain facts of beloved American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments constitute constant, and, I think, needed reminders. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense, which tends to stifle honest discourse, has gone on long enough.

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KIM JUNG-UN

As a descendant of slaves, I have no difficulty with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain facts of American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments constitute constant, and, I think, needed reminders. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense, which tends to stifle honest discourse, has gone on long enough.

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GEORGE W. BUSH

As a descendant of slaves, I’ve no problem with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain facts of American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments constitute constant, and, I think, needed reminders. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense, which tends to stifle honest discourse, has gone on long enough.

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Anonymous

Michael “Mike” Signer is the mayor of Charlottesville, Virginia[1] and an author, advocate, political theorist, and attorney. He is a Virginia Democratic activist.

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Carlton

Some white folks are so damn afraid of diversity it’s pathetic. This is NOT their country. Native Americans were here 1st……everybody else is an immigrant. White folks….get a clue and a brain.

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anon

It’s only a white folks thing because its only the anglo countries & northern eu, that is going down this ‘lets change our culture and celebrate diversity’ path. If you annually imported millions of blacks or whites into Japan or China, Indonesia or millions of asians & whites into Pakistan, Angola, Columbia, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam and then started to have these ethnic minority groups complain and want to change legislation & culture & traditions of that country to accommodate them, its a safe bet the majority of the locals wont give a crap about embracing diversity.

This statue is not a race/diversity issue though many are trying to hype it that way to paint all those who want to keep it where its been for many decades as as nazi/kkk/supremacist supporters. The park has been renamed (with slave theme) and numerous other confederate statues taken down in other states. Enough is enough for some. It should be put to a vote of local rate payers, not to the whims of a temporary mayor.

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Charlie

If we want to be PC in this country does that mean we will change the name of Washington State, Washington, DC, removing George Washington from the dollar bill and quarter, etc. since he owned slaves. Why don’t we just name ANOTHER bridge or highway or avenue after MLK. I have no problem with Martin Luther King, Jr. He was a great man but we have to understand that we dilute the legacy of great men like Martin Luther King, Jr. when we name everything after him to the point that we just call it “MLK”. Now back on topic – How long did this statue and all these other monuments stand before someone decided it was offensive? Why do we have to separate ourselves by race? We have Black Caucus, Black History Month, Black Spring Break, and the list goes on. If we want to be one in this country regardless of race or origin we need to remove “black” from things like the aforementioned groups or events and just call it a caucus or spring break which we do have. Keep Black History Month to celebrate black culture just like Hispanic Heritage Month to celebrate Hispanic culture. We are a multi-cultural country. Let’s enjoy what other cultures bring us and share each other’s cultures. Let’s have European-American History Month without it being racist or letting the KKK or other white supremacist groups glum onto the month and ruin it. Just like keeping other culture’s racist groups from not attaching a stigma to their historical or heritage months. I say keep the statues and names as it is history and God forbid we ever repeat it. For all the PC people that exist: You are the only type of people that many people do hate. If you are offended by a statue or a name then you have to ask yourself “how weak minded or sensitive am I?” Of course even other PC people hate PC people which is a bit hypocritical.

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Denise

I have been asking this very question. How long has this statue been there and how long had it been called Lee Park? Also why rename it “Emancipation Park”? That in itself makes this racial. So sad? My great grandfather signed an oath of loyalty to the USA after the Civil War. He owned no slaves.

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Anonymous

As an American, I have a big problem with the statue. It should be torn down and replaced. The Confederacy was never a part of the USA. The public should not have to pay taxes to build and maintain them or the parks that present them to the public. All public artifacts of the Confederacy should be destroyed.

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Anonymous

You are the biggest moron on this thread!! So stupid I almost feel sorry for you.

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Spiderman

Honestly, the rally we saw happened for a reason. The so called “white supremacy” is very propaganda and miss-leading. Those who joined the movement are not empowered, but rather weak and victims of decades of liberal movement to empower the minorities and LGBT etc. And ironically over looked the white working class group. The “Unit the Right” movement is not different from “Black Lives Matters” movement. What they represent is ethnic groups being unfairly treated by government agendas. The one thing that made Dems lose the election, was they so completely banked on empowering all the minority groups, and thought that would generate enough votes for the party to stay in power forever. And Trump won precisely because white working class people are fed up with decades of depression by Dems direction. So this isn’t simply a problem of racism, but rather a result of liberals trying to create a climate to have them stay in power forever. And white working class people ended up being the victims. Yet liberals fails to acknowledge this and brands white working class people “alt right”, “white supremacist” etc to discredit their genuine issues. I, myself, am an Asian Canadian, and I’m an immigrant myself. But in all fairness, I totally feel the pain of the white working class people. They are the forgotten men and women that Trump speaks about, and liberal media like CNN try to discredit about everyday.

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Carlton

That is your opinion. If you are not black..you are NOT qualified to speak with any authority on the black experience…..none. These hate groups do not belong in America. Racism is alive and the ignorance of many people is deplorable.

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CM

Sure he does. Anyone has a right to observe upon the experience of another, and your attempt to enforce otherwise is totalitarian, silly and asserts another is incapable of understanding the plight of another, which is rubbish.

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Anonymous

“decades of depression by Dems direction”? Pretty sure it was neither Bill Clinton or Barack Obama who were in power the last time our economy shit the bed.

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JOHN MAYOR - A.K.A., RICHARM M. NIXON, ROBERT LEE'S HORSE, SOME GUY DOWN THE STREET, HOMER SIMPSON, ADOLF HITLER, KIM JUNG-UN, AND GEORGE W. BUSH

I… i.e., WE!… agree!
.
Please!… no emails!… Jesus is Lord!

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Jamal James

Well said Conway. I can’t stop thinking about Robert E. Lee’s character – that he turned down a request by Lincoln to join the Union but he was loyal to Virginia – that he is the only cadet in West Point history to never receive a demerit – that his men respected him and even the Union soldiers respected him that day at the courthouse.
Oh well. I do know that this divisiveness will end one day – one way or another – maybe sooner than when the Chinese get here 14 years from now.

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lukasiwicz

As a descendant of slaves, I have no problem with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain facts of American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments constitute constant, and, I think, needed reminders. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense, which tends to stifle honest discourse, has gone on long enough.

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Conway Redding

As a descendant of slaves, I have no problem with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain a fact off American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments remain a constant reminder. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense has gone on long enough and tends to stifle honest discourse.

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RICHARD M. NIXON

As a descendant of slaves, I have no problem with the Robert E. Lee statue. The Civil War, and one of its primary causes, the issue of slavery, remain facts of American history. of which Confederate memorials/monuments constitute constant, and, I think, needed reminders. As far as I am concerned, they should remain where they are. Likewise, if someone wants to display the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, let him/her do so. This PC nonsense, which tends to stifle honest discourse, has gone on long enough!

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ImnotAmericanImMe

The people who want the Confederate Statues taken down are no different than ISIS who also wants to destroy statues that offend them.

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