‘Shark Tank’ Products on February 27 Rerun: Facts on the Companies

On February 27, Shark Tank will show a rerun that originally aired on October 31, 2014. Watch the episode above.

Here are the facts on the five companies that were featured, four of which we interviewed.

To read all of Heavy’s Shark Tank coverage, click here.


1. TITIN

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TITIN is a weighted shirt with gel inserts that helps maximize the results of your workouts.

Back in October, Heavy interviewed creator and CEO Patrick Whaley, who designed the shirt while still in high school.

“Growing up, I was always the skinny kid in school. I used to fill my bookbag with books and do shoulder shrugs on the way to class to build muscle, Whaley explained. “TITIN gave me the opportunity to introduce a life-changing training tool into the sporting world and I jumped at the opportunity to continue sculpting my idea.”

He asked the sharks for $500,000 for 5 percent of his company. Although Mark and Robert were skeptical on his integrity, Kevin and Daymond gave him offers. In the end, he went with Daymond, who asked for 20 percent of the company.

Buy TITIN apparel here.

To read our complete article on the company, see below:


2. Singtrix

Heavy interviewed John Devecka, Al Roque and Eric Berkowitz about their revolutionary karaoke machine, Singtrix, with 350 special effects that make even the worst singers sound like rockstars. The idea came after John was in a band, trying to sing back-up.

“Everyone told him to stop and wanted him to stick to playing play guitar. That’s when the search began to create or find a technology that could make bad singers sound good,” Berkowitz said.

The men explained that the standard karaoke systems that saturate the market are limiting. “In all cases you will still sound bad if you can’t sing. That’s about 95% of the population. Many are too embarrassed of their voices and wouldn’t even try. This limits the experience to only a small group,” Roque said.

Devecka and Berkowitz asked for $1.5 million for 5 percent of the company. They then sampled their machine, which impressed the sharks. Three of them- Kevin, Lori and Robert- gave them deals, but all backed out after the men only upped their percentage from five to seven.

Buy Singtrix here.

To read our complete article on the company, see below:


3. Myself Belts

Myself Belts, belts made with Velcro for kids to easily use, entered the Tank back in October.

Heavy interviewed owner Talia Goldfarb, who started the company after potty training her then 2-year-old son. “I struggled to find a solution because the belts with buckles just didn’t work with his small hands, and he wanted to be independent after having mastered potty training,” she explained. “Also, he needed something that could be quickly undone at a moment’s notice.”

She realized there were no belts geared towards little hands and started the business with her sister in 2004. Goldfarb asked for $60,000 for 10 percent equity. She accepted Daymond’s offer of $75,000 for 25 percent of the company.

Buy Myself Belts here.

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To read our complete article on the company, see below:


4. Beardbrand

Beardbrand focuses on the grooming of beards, with beard oil their biggest seller.

Eric Bandholz, a former financial advisor, founded the company. He asked the sharks for 15 percent of the business for $400,000. Although he didn’t get a deal, he expressed on his site that he was grateful for the opportunity.

He explained, “While 17 million men in America wear facial hair, the Sharks do not – with the exception of Daymond’s well sculpted goatee. I still think I could have done a better job explaining what it means to be a beardsman and what this movement is about – perhaps that would have gotten a Shark to bite.”

Buy Beardbrand products here.


5. Grace & Lace

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Grace & Lace, an accessory company for women, originally entered the Tank in Season 5. On this episode, the show revisits the contestants to see how their company has progressed.

We interviewed Rick and Melissa Hinnant, the husband and wife team behind the company. The business was born through their tragic loss of a child. Melissa was on bed rest during her pregnancy and learn to sew to make the baby a blanket. Sadly, their newborn, Halle, went to Heaven immediately upon delivery because her lungs were not yet developed.

Through the grace of God, they forged ahead, and fittingly named their company Grace and Lace. Rick said, “We were devastated at the loss but instead of being mad at God, bitter, asking ‘Why us?,’ we decided to trust God through our pain knowing He was in control. We didn’t need to understand but our hope was that something good would come from the tragedy. That’s where Grace and Lace was born and it’s really a story of tragedy to triumph.”

The couple asked for $175,000 for 10 percent of their company. Barbara gave them the deal, with the stipulation that half of the money would be a line of credit, and Rick said, “Her connections have been/are priceless and Grace and Lace has some really amazing media exposure coming in the future.”

The business has seen tremendous growth since they debuted on Shark Tank. “We had a little over $1 million in sales the 12 months before we filmed and now we’ve surpassed $10.5 million since we aired only 1 yr and 3 months ago,” Rick reported. As for their bestsellers, the sales of Dainty boot cuffs, Miss Molly leg warmers and Milly Lace boot socks surpass the rest of their products.

Buy Grace & Lace clothing here.

To read our complete article on the company, see below:


To read all of Heavy’s Shark Tank coverage, click here.

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