Watch Popeye Online: How to Stream Classic Episodes

Watch Popeye Online

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Popeye is a classic cartoon series that is based on a comic strip character created by E. C. Segan who is considered to be one of the most influential cartoonists of the 1900s. The comic strip, which features sailors Bluto, or Brutus in the later cartoons, and Popeye who fight over the skinny Olive Oyl, was adapted into a series of shorts that were shown before films at movie theatres in the 1930s and 1940s for Paramount Pictures releases. The shorts were released over a 25 year period before the series became and television series. Now you can watch Popeye streaming. Over two seasons 241 episodes of Popeye were released; the characters would occasionally crossover with Looney Tunes cartoons, and would be revived for the Popeye and Son series in the 1980s. The Popeye series starred classic voice actors Jack Mercer, Mae Questel, Bonnie Poe, and Billy Costello.

Here’s your guide to watch Popeye streaming online:


How to Watch Popeye Online & Stream Classic Episodes

In the United States, Amazon Prime is the only streaming service with episodes of the classic Popeye cartoons in its library. Here’s how to watch:

If you have Amazon Prime, you can watch both seasons of the 1960’s version of Popeye on your computer right here, and you can watch old film shorts from the 1930’s-1950’s right here. Or, you can watch either on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the Amazon Video app.

If you don’t have Prime, you can sign up for a free 30-day trial here. Once signed up, you can watch both seasons of the 1960’s version of Popeye on your computer right here, and you can watch film shorts from the 1930’s-1950’s right here. Or, you can watch either on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the Amazon Video app.


NOTE: Spoilers to follow

How Many Popeye Seasons Are There?

There are two seasons and 241 episodes of Popeye animated series; in addition there are 108 original film shorts produced to run before Paramount Pictures releases at movie theatres. Here is a season breakdown for Popeye:

Popeye Season 1

169 episodes | 1960 – 1961
Popeye, Olive Oyl, Swee’Pea, and Wimpy go on a series of adventures and misadventures, and fight with Brutus and the evil Sea Hag. Popeye buys a newspaper, Popeye discovers he isn’t an orphan, and Popeye floods all of New York City.

Popeye Season 2

52 episodes | 1961 – 1962
Brutus swindles Olive Oyl, kidnaps Swee’Pea, and becomes jealous of Popeye’s fame in the city. Popeye fights the Sea Hag, and Brutus buys a Popeye robot to confuse Olive Oyl. The crew celebrates Swee’Pea’s birthday, and Olive gets fat.

Popeye Original Film Shorts

108 episodes | 1930s – 1950s
In a series of 6 to 10 minute film shorts, Popeye battles Bluto, decides to become a lifeguard, meets Sinbad the Sailor, meets Aladdin, and loses and wins the heart of Olive Oyl several times.


What Are the Best Popeye Episodes?

With more than 300 episodes and short films, there is something for everyone in the Popeye franchise. The series is listed as one of the TV Guide’s 60 Greatest Animated Series. Here is a list of the best Popeye episodes:

Popeye Short Film “Popeye the Sailor Meets Sinbad the Sailor”

In this short, released for Paramount Pictures, Popeye battles Bluto, who is pretending to be Sinbad, and claiming he is a better sailor. He kidnaps Olive Oyl to prove it and Popeye must save her. This short was nominated for an Oscar.

Season 2, Episode 50 “Roger”

In this episode a talking dog named Roger must get Popeye’s help to stop the robbery of a jewelry store.

Season 2, Episode 42 “Which is Witch”

The Sea Hag kidnaps Popeye by replacing Olive Oyl with a robot that takes Popeye to the Hag’s island.

Season 1, Episode 1 “Hits and Missiles”

Popeye, Olive, and Wimpy go to the moon and must save people ruled by the tyrant Big Cheese. This was the first episode of the new Popeye series in 1960.

Season 1, Episode 41 “Goon with the Wind”

Olive is kidnapped and forced to marry the Goonking of Goonland, but before Popeye can rescue her, his spinach is stolen.

Season 1, Episode 77 “Popeye’s Cool Pool”

In the middle of a heat wave, Popeye builds a pool for Olive and Swee’Pea, which Brutus schemes to get for his own.

Season 1, Episode 142 “Popeye the Piano Mover”

Popeye and Brutus are piano movers vying for Olive’s attention; when her piano gets away from them, Wimpy is a traffic cop who chases them down.


Who Are the Voice Actors in the Popeye Cast?

Veteran voice actors Jack Mercer, Jackson Beck, and Mae Questal starred in the Popeye cartoons. Here are the voice actors remembered for their starring roles on Popeye:

Jack Mercer as Popeye

Popeye is an orphan sailor who is in love with Olive; when he is outmatched or must fight, he eats a can of spinach and is unbeatable. Jack Mercer provided the voice for Popeye after he was heard singing the series theme song; he was a rookie animator at the time. Mercer would go on to provide voices for nearly every Popeye iteration and other series that include The Mighty Hercules, The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie, and The All-New Popeye Hour.

Mae Questal as Olive Oyl

Olive Oyl is a hapless female who must often be saved by Popeye. Mae Questal was an award-winning voice actor who provided voice for a host of film and animated television series. Her most-remembered live-action role is as Aunt Bethany in National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation; in addition to the voice of Olive, she also provided voices for Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Monkey Doodles.

Jackson Beck as Bluto

Bluto is Popeye’s arch-nemesis and an underhanded sailor. Jackson Beck was a well-known voice actor who provided voices for a number of animated films and television series include The New Adventures of Superman, Popeye the Sailor, and Tom Corbett, Space Cadet.


Who Are the Top Guest Stars on Popeye?

Several veteran voice actors made appearances in the Popeye cartoons, supported the main cast of Mercer, Questal, and Beck. Here are the voice actors remembered for their guest starring roles on Popeye:

Harry Foster Welch

Harry Foster Welch provided voices for several Popeye shorts including “House Tricks”, “Abusement Park”, and “For Better or Nurse”.

Floyd Buckley as Popeye, various

Floyd Buckley was a well-known actor and voice actor whose most notable roles include early films such as The Seven Pearls and The Master Mystery. He also provided voices for a handful of Popeye shorts for Paramount Pictures.

Bonnie Poe as Olive Oyl, various

Bonnie Poe was a classic Hollywood actress who provided voices for many classic animated series including Betty Boop, Looney Tunes, and Popeye.

William “Billy” Costello as Popeye

Billy Costello provided the voice of Popeye in several original shorts for Paramount Pictures; he would also voice Popeye for Looney Tunes cartoons.

William Pennell as Bluto

William Pennell provided the voice of Bluto for several Popeye shorts as well as throughout the Looney Tunes franchise.

Gus Wickie as Bluto, various

Gus Wickie provided the voice for Bluto for several Popeye shorts for Paramount Pictures.


Who Are the Writers & Creators Behind Popeye?

Popeye was first a comic book character created by E. C. Segar, which was developed into a series of film shorts for Paramount Pictures in the 1930s and 1950s before becoming an animated cartoon for television in 1960. Here are the producers and writers remembered for the part in Popeye:

E. C. Segar: Popeye Creator, Writer

E.C. Segar was a writer and cartoonist who is best known for creating the character Popeye. Segar was working for King Features Syndicate when he began drawing Thimble Theatre which featured several characters who would become part of the Popeye franchise. Segar was one of the first cartoonists to combine humor and adventures and is considered to be one of the most influential cartoonists of the 1900s.

Max Fleischer: Popeye Developer

Max Fleischer, along with his brother Dave, developed Popeye into a series of shorts for Paramount Pictures. In addition to the shorts, he is known for is work on Gulliver’s Travels. He was nominated for an Oscar for his work in Popeye the Sailor Meets Sinbad the Sailor.

Dave Fleischer: Popeye Developer

Dave Fleischer and his brother Max developed Popeye from a comic strip into a series of shorts for Paramount Pictures. He was nominated for an Oscar for his work on Imagination. His other notable works include Gulliver’s Travels and Mr. Bug Goes to Town.

Al Brodax: Popeye Executive Producer

Al Brodax was a well-known producer and writer who is known for his contributions to the animated series Popeye the Sailor from 1960 – 1962. His other notable series include Cool McCool and Beetle Bailey.

Larry Harmon: Popeye Executive Producer

Larry Harmon was a well-known producer, actor, and writer whose most notable works include Bozo: The World’s Most Famous Clown and Popeye. He also played Richard Hunter in the TV series Matt Houston.

Jack Kinney: Popeye Executive Producer

Jack Kinney was a well-known writer, producer, and director who is best known for his work on the Walt Disney films Dumbo and Pinocchio. He was an executive producer for Popeye and directed five episodes of Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color.


Where Popeye Ranks in the Television Pantheon

Popeye began as a comic strip that was created by famed cartoonist E. C. Segan. It features sailors Bluto, or Brutus in the later cartoons, and Popeye who fight over the skinny Olive Oyl. The comic strip was later developed into a series of classic shorts that were shown before Paramount Pictures releases beginning in the 1930s. One of the shorts, Popeye the Sailor Meets Sinbad the Sailor was nominated for an Oscar. The movie shorts would air for 25 years and would be later syndicated to various television networks. Many have been traced by artists to add color to the original black-and-white versions. In 1960 Popeye was made into an all-new, animated series that has become a classic; that series ran for two years and included 241 episodes. IGN has listed Popeye at number 17 on their list of the Top 100 Best Animated TV Series, and the series also made it onto TV Guide’s list of the 60 Greatest Cartoons of All Time at number 12.

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