Butter Cloth on ‘Shark Tank’: A Look Inside the Apparel Company

Butter Cloth Shark Tank, Metta World Peace on Shark Tank, Mens Dress Shirts on Shark Tank October 28

ABC

Butter Cloth is a clothing brand company that boasts shirts that allow you to move freely and comfortably while still looking sharp.

The company was created by Danh Tran, a clothing designer living in Los Angeles, who was born in Vietnam. According to All Shark Tank Products, Tran worked in his family’s small tailor shop growing up and has been making clothes since he was 10 years old. In 1994, he came to California, where he earned an AA Degree in Fashion Design from LA Trade Tech.

After graduating from Otis College of Art and Design in 2006 and working for a number of fashion design companies, he came up with the idea of Butter Cloth. He spent years creating dress shirts that were stiff and scratchy and realized there was a need for a comfortable shirt that could still be dressed up.

And how exactly did Tran catch the eye of Metta World Peace? He began by selling the shirts through Facebook in 2017. That’s when Metta World Peace came across the clothing brand and became an equity partner in the company. He’s quoted by All Shark Tank Products as saying, “Butter Cloth is one of the best midday meeting shirts. It’s comfortable. I don’t have to worry about ripping my shirt. I can wear it with a jacket. I think it’s brilliant.”

In the words of Shark Tank Blog, Mr. Peace brings a certain degree of credibility to the company “along with an understanding of eCommerce.” The outlet writes, “To get up to speed in the digital marketing world, he studied digital analytics and marketing at UCLA after he stopped playing basketball and decided he wanted to get into businesses where he could monetize his personal brand. He like Butter Cloth because of the fit and comfort of the shirts.”

Tran experimented with a number of materials before settling on an 100% natural, long fiber cotton for Butter Cloth. The shirts sell for $108 or $118 and come in a variety of patterns. They can stretch six ways, and in the words of Tran, their double-finished construction “looks like a Friday night, but feels like a Sunday morning.”

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