Dick Clark’s New Year’s Eve 2019-2020 Hosts & Performers

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Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest is one of the longest-running TV specials covering the Times Square ball drop on New Year’s Eve each year. Over the years, it has expanded to include segments in New Orleans and Hollywood. Here’s what you need to know about the hosts and performers for the 2019-2020 special, airing Tuesday, December 31 beginning at 8 p.m. ET on ABC.


Hosts

The 48th year of this celebration will feature Ryan Seacrest in the lead emcee spot, a role he took on in 2005 after Dick Clark stepped down because of residual effects from a stroke he suffered in 2004. Clark would continue to make guest appearances on the program until his death in 2012. Seacrest’s new Times Square correspondent is Lucy Hale; Jenny McCarthy previously held that role, but she has stepped aside this year to spend more time with her son in between filming seasons of The Masked Singer.

Hale previously hosted the New Orleans segments of the program. Now that she has moved to Times Square, Emmy winner Billy Porter will take over that gig. Ciara rounds out the foursome by covering the Hollywood segments for the second year in a row.


Performers

The 2019-2020 lineup includes Post Malone, Korean pop group BTS, Sam Hunt and Alanis Morissette, Paula Abdul, host Ciara, Kelsea Ballerini, Blanco Brown, Dan + Shay, Green Day, Dua Lipa, Ava Max, Megan Thee Stallion, Anthony Ramos, Salt-N-Pepa, SHAED, Sheryl Crow, Usher, and the Jonas Brothers.

“Ringing in the New Year with this unbelievable roster of talent is sure to be a magical event,” said Rob Mills, senior vice president, Alternative Series, Specials and Late Night, ABC Entertainment, in a statement. “We couldn’t be more excited to honor and share this iconic celebration with the world.”

There will also be a special appearance by country artist Jessie James Decker as she reveals the first-ever Powerball Millionaire of the Year during the live broadcast. The winner will be revealed just after midnight ET on January 1.


New Year’s Eve marks the end of a calendar year on the Gregorian calendar, the calendar first introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, after whom it is named. Most countries celebrate the final day the year with parties, social gatherings, festivals, and/or fireworks. It goes by many names the world over, including Hogmanay in Scotland, Calennig in Wales, Baharu in Indonesia and Malaysia, Silvester in many European countries, Reveillon in France, Portugal, and Brazil, Kanun Novodgo Goda in Russia, and Omisoka in Japan.

Kiritimati, Tonga, and New Zealand are some of the first places to celebrate New Year’s Eve because they are located just west of the International Date Line, while the U.S.’ Baker Island is one of the last places to celebrate because it is just east of the International Date Line. Interestingly, because of the way the International Date Line jogs around a bit, Kiritimati is actually east of Baker Island.

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In the United States, New Year’s is traditionally celebrated with parties and “drops,” the most famous of which is the ball drop held in New York City’s Times Square. But there are dozens of other “drops” held across the country, including a conch drop in Key West, Florida; a peach drop in Atlanta; an Indy car drop in Indianapolis; an acorn drop in Raleigh, North Carolina; a moon pie drop in Mobile, Alabama; a fleur-de-lis drop in New Orleans, a “Glowtato” drop in Boise, Idaho; and a tortilla chip drop in Tempe, Arizona, which is tied in to the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl game of college football.

New York also rings in the new year with a “Midnight Run” around Central Park that includes a fireworks show. Other fireworks displays around the country include shows at the Disney theme parks, the Las Vegas strip, and the Chicago “Chi-Town Rising” event.

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