Are Liquor Stores Open on New Year’s Eve & Day 2020-2021?

Liquor stores on New Year's

Getty Liquor stores on New Year's

If you’re wanting to visit a liquor store on New Year’s Day 2021 or New Year’s Eve 2020, whether you can go is going to depend on the laws in your state. Some liquor stores can’t operate on New Year’s, while other states will allow liquor stores to be open. Although most liquor stores are open on New Year’s Eve, some may close early because of the holiday. So you’ll need to know if you need to pick up your liquor early if you’re wanting it for the New Year’s holiday.


Some Liquor Stores Are Open for New Year’s, But Many Are Not

Some states require liquor stores to be closed on New Year’s Day, while others are more accommodating. This year, New Year’s Eve 2020 falls on a Thursday and New Year’s Day is on a Friday, so neither will be affected by Sunday laws, but they could be affected by other laws. In general, if liquor sales are state-controlled, then there’s a chance those liquor stores could be closed for New Year’s Day unless otherwise indicated below. If the stores in a state are privately owned and not state-controlled, then the stores are more likely to be open and it’s up to the owner (unless local laws interfere.) Your best bet is to call your local liquor store and ask if they are open today or not. Many of these details below are provided by Legal Beer, VinePair, or are from Wikipedia’s detailed page on alcohol laws here.

Below is a list of rules about liquor laws on New Year’s in each state. You should still call your local store, as the pandemic may change how things run today and some places are closing early on New Year’s Eve, even though they can be open. The listings below do not include pandemic laws regarding the closures of bars or alcohol establishments unless it specifically states so.

  • Alabama – Many counties don’t allow the sale of alcohol at all. Privately-owned liquor stores tend to be open on public holidays, but it’s not guaranteed, while state-owned stores are closed on New Year’s Day. According to their website, ABC stores are all closed on New Year’s Day but open New Year’s Eve. Last year, some stores closed early on New Year’s Eve, so you’ll want to call and check.
  • Alaska – No specific holiday restrictions.
  • Arizona – Alcohol is not state-controlled. So stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day if they want. Call to confirm.
  • Arkansas – Note that about 39 out of 75 counties in Arkansas are dry and prohibit alcohol sales completely. Stores can be open on New Year’s Eve or Day, so call to confirm about your local store. Shamrock Liquor, for example, will be open 7 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. on New Year’s Eve and 9 a.m. to Midnight on New Year’s Day.
  • California – No statewide holiday restrictions. Stores have the option of being open on both New Year’s Day and New Year’s Eve. Call to confirm.
  • Colorado – No statewide holiday restrictions for New Year’s (unlike Christmas.) This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day if they want. Call to confirm.
  • Connecticut  – Liquor stores must be closed on Christmas and New Year’s and Thanksgiving. Call your local store to confirm New Year’s Eve hours, since liquor stores can be open on that day but not New Year’s.
    Connecticut law reads: “The sale or dispensing of alcoholic liquor in places operating under package store permits, drug store permits, manufacturer permits for beer, manufacturer permits for beer and brew pubs, manufacturer permits for a farm brewery, manufacturer permits for farm distilleries or grocery store beer permits shall be unlawful on Thanksgiving Day, New Year’s Day or Christmas.”
  • D.C.  – Liquor stores can be open on New Year’s Eve & Day, so call to confirm hours at your local store. Sales aren’t state-controlled.
  • Delaware – There’s no statewide ban on sales on New Year’s Day. So call to see the hours your local store is open. Sales aren’t state-controlled, but liquor can’t be sold on Sundays, Thanksgiving, Easter, or Christmas. However, New Year’s is in the clear.
  • Florida – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day if they want. Call to confirm the store hours, since local store owners might change their hours for the holidays.
  • Georgia – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day if they want. Call to confirm the store hours, since local store owners might change their hours for the holidays.
  • Hawaii – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day if they want. Call to confirm the store hours, since local store owners might change their hours for the holidays.
  • Idaho – No statewide New Year’s restrictions, but alcoholic beverages exceeding 15% can only be sold in contracted stores or in Idaho State Liquor Dispensary stores. Sometimes these state-run stores don’t sell liquor if the government “recognizes” New Year’s Day. In other words, you will need to call your local store to know if it is selling liquor today or not, even though New Year’s isn’t restricted statewide.
  • Illinois – No statewide New Year’s restrictions. Decisions are made by counties or municipalities. Some regions sell 24-hours a day, some have 24-hour bans. So call your local store about New Year’s Eve and Day hours.
  • Indiana – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day if they want. Call to confirm the store hours, since local store owners might change their hours for the holidays.
  • Iowa – Sales are state-controlled, but there are no holiday restrictions for New Year’s, so stores can be open. So you’ll want to call your local store to confirm New Year’s Eve or Day hours. For example, Bancroft Liquor Store is open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on New Year’s Eve and 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on New Year’s Day.
  • Kansas – New Year’s sales are allowed, unlike the restrictions on Christmas. Since stores can be open, call to confirm New Year’s Eve and Day hours. Sales are not state-controlled, but sales are prohibited on Memorial Day, Labor Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter.
  • Kentucky – Sales are not state-controlled. Many stores will be open on both New Year’s Day and New Year’s Eve. However, this can vary from city to city, so call ahead to confirm hours. Corn Silk Liquors, for example, is open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on New Year’s Eve and 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on New Year’s Day.
  • Louisiana – Sales aren’t state-controlled, but some parishes limit holiday sales. Call your local store to confirm hours.
  • Maine – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day if they want. Call to confirm the store hours, since local store owners might change their hours for the holidays.
  • Maryland – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours, since local store owners might change their hours for the holidays.
  • Massachusetts –  Sales aren’t state-controlled and liquor stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day, unlike the rule that liquor stores must be closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas. Call to confirm the store hours. In Montgomery County, you can see all the ABS store hours here, including that stores are typically open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on New Year’s Eve and closed on New Year’s Day.
  • Michigan – Some sales are state-controlled, but holiday hours are only enforced on New Year’s Day and Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. For New Year’s, the law reads: “On-premises licensees: Do not sell alcoholic beverages between 4 am and 7 am on New Year’s Day [Rule 436.1403]. Off-premises licensees (convenience, drug, grocery stores): Do not sell alcoholic beverages between 2 am and 7 am on New Year’s Day [Rule 436.1503].”
  • Minnesota – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours. This is different from Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and Thanksgiving, when sales aren’t allowed in this state.
  • Mississippi — Sales aren’t state-controlled. So stores can be open, but call ahead to confirm hours. State rules note: “On New Years Eve, all on-premises permittees may remain open until 1:00 a.m. New Years Day. If New Year’s Eve falls on Sunday, on-premises permittees may open from 1:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.”
  • Missouri –  Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours, since local store owners might change their hours for the holidays.
  • Montana – Some sales are state-controlled.  Montana requires state agency franchise liquor stores to be closed on Labor Day, New Year’s Day, MLK, President’s Day, Memorial Day, July 4, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. Call to check.
  • Nebraska – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours, since local store owners might change their hours for the holidays.
  • Nevada – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours.
  • New Hampshire – Liquor is sold in government-run stores. They are allowed to be open and there are no official bans, but sometimes stores close early on New Year’s Eve. It’s best not to make any assumptions about when your local store will be open, so you’ll need to call to confirm. For example, the New Hampshire Liquor & Wine Outlet says it’s offering extended hours through the holiday season.
  • New Jersey – No statewide restrictions, but there are dry communities. This means that if the community you’re in isn’t dry, then your stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day. Call to confirm the hours.
  • New Mexico – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours. This is different from Christmas, when takeaway liquor is banned and stores must be closed.
  • New York  –  There are no statewide bans, which means that stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. But some local areas might have restrictions, so it’s good to call ahead.
  • North Carolina – Stores are closed on New Year’s Day. The state statute requires that stores be closed on Sundays and most holidays, which includes Christmas, New Year’s, and Thanksgiving. Sales are state-controlled. Call to confirm when you’re local store closes on New Year’s Eve, since some might close early. No ABC store can be open on New Year’s Day.
  • North Dakota: No statewide restrictions.  This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours. Sales are only limited on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Christmas Eve.
  • Ohio – No statewide restrictions on New Year’s Eve or Day, so call ahead to confirm the hours since stores can be open. This is different from Christmas, when they must be closed.
  • Oklahoma – No statewide New Year’s restrictions. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours. This is different from some other holidays, such as when alcohol sales are forbidden on Thanksgiving, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, and Christmas.
  • Oregon – Stores have the option of being open on all state holidays including New Year’s Eve and Day. So that means stores can be open. Call to confirm hours.
  • Pennsylvania – Any Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board store is closed on New Year’s Day. Call for New Year’s Eve hours.
  • Rhode Island – No statewide restrictions. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours.
  • South Carolina – No statewide restrictions. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours. This is different from Christmas, when stores are closed.
  • South Dakota – No statewide restrictions. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours.
  • Tennessee –  Open for New Year’s Eve but closed on New Year’s Day. Sales aren’t state-controlled, but liquor sales aren’t allowed on certain holidays. Businesses can’t “sell or give away any alcoholic beverages” on New Year’s Day, the Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving or Christmas.
  • Texas – Closed on New Year’s Day. Sales aren’t state-controlled, but liquor stores still aren’t allowed to be open on Christmas, New Year’s, or Thanksgiving. This also includes stores, bars, and restaurants. Stores can be open on New Year’s Eve, but call to confirm when they’re closing, since many close early.
  • Utah – State stores closed on New Year’s Day. Alcohol greater than 4% (and beer greater than 5%) is sold in state-controlled stores only. Call to confirm hours.
  • Vermont – No statewide New Year’s Eve restrictions. But you’ll want to call to confirm hours as some stores may be closed.
  • Virginia – Many stores will be open on both New Year’s Day and New Year’s Eve. For the first time several years ago, liquor stores were allowed to be open on New Year’s Day. According to VABC, stores can open January 1 at noon and will close at 6 p.m.
  • Washington – Sales are state-controlled, but there are no statewide New Year’s restrictions. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours.
  • West Virginia – No statewide New Year’s restrictions. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours. This is different from Christmas, when stores are closed.
  • Wisconsin – Sales aren’t state-controlled. This means stores can be open on New Year’s Eve and Day. Call to confirm the store hours.
  • Wyoming — Sales are state-controlled. But there are no statewide restrictions for New Year’s Eve or Day, so stores can be open. Call to confirm hours.

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