Nintendo Won the Lawsuit Against their Mii Characters

Mii, Super Smash Bros for Wii U, Knuckles

(Nintendo)

Nintendo won a patent case against their Mii characters last Friday.

According to a press release, The patent infringement lawsuit was filed against Nintendo in 2011 by RecogniCorp, LLC, who claimed that the iconic Mii characters used the same techniques described in the patent for making police sketches of suspects. In 2015, a court ruled that the patent itself was invalid since mathematical operations cannot be patented. But then RecogniCorp appealed the decision.

Now a federal appeals court confirmed that the patent asserted against Nintendo shouldn’t have been granted in the first place. That’s becuase RecogniCorp had not shown an “inventive concept that transforms the claimed subject matter from an abstract idea into a patent-eligible application,” according to court documents as reported by GeekWire.

“We are very pleased with the court’s decision,” said Ajay Singh, Nintendo of America’s Director of Litigation and Compliance. “The decision marks another case in which Nintendo’s unique ideas overcame unjustified threats of patent infringement. Nintendo has a long history of developing innovative products and we will continue to vigorously defend all our products from meritless patent lawsuits.”

You can check out the full document about the case’s decision here.

Mii, Super Smash Bros for Wii U, Mii Fighter

(Nintendo)

This is just one of the many lawsuits involving Nintendo. In March, Nintendo was awarded $9.5 million by a Canadian federal court over a case against a huge seller of mod chips, flash carts, and game copiers used to download Nintendo games illegally.

Probably the most famous lawsuit against Nintendo was when Universal Studios accused the company of copyright infringement of King Kong with the game Donkey Kong in 1982. The court ruled in Nintendo’s favor as Universal had previously claimed that King Kong was in the public domain in response to the creation of their 1976 remake of RKO Pictures’s 1933 film. Nintendo was awarded $1.8 million in damages. Nintendo gifted John Kirby, their attorney, a $30,000 sailboat named Donkey Kong. It is also said that Nintendo’s pink puff Kirby was named after him.


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