WATCH: Muhiyidin d’Baha Grabs Confederate Flag in South Carolina

Muhiyidin d’Baha grabs Confederate flag at protest.Muhiyidin d’Baha grabs Confederate flag at protest. By: The Post and Courier Published on: February 22, 2017 Source: http://www.tout.com/m/6kbt4w2017-02-23T00:38:07.000Z

A Black Lives Matter activist caused a stir in South Carolina when he leaped over a barricade to capture a confederate flag. Raw video showed Muhiyidin d’Baha jumping at two members of South Carolina’s Secessionist Party on the night of February 22. WCSC-TV reports that d’Baha’s real name is Muhiydin Elamin Moye.

Not only that, but the amazing feat was also featured live on a local CBS News broadcast:

VideoVideo related to watch: muhiyidin d’baha grabs confederate flag in south carolina2017-02-23T10:21:10-05:00

The Post and Courier reports that the Confederate boys were protesting a speech by Bree Newsome at the College of Charleston. Newsome is the person who tore down a Confederate flag shortly after Dylann Roof murdered nine black churchgoers in the summer of 2015. That same report adds that d’Baha was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct. His $2,000 bail was raised by crowdfunding.

WATCH: Muhiyidin d’Baha Grabs Confederate Flag in South Carolina

D’Baha’s mugshot.

This isn’t D’Baha’s first brush with a disorderly conduct charge. The Charleston City & Paper reported in July 2016 that d’Baha was arrested for the same offense. In that instance, d’Baha disrupted a North Charleston Public Safety Committee meeting. He was part of a group that was seeking a citizens’ review board to oversee the North Charleston Police Department. One blogger, Cedar Posts, notes that D’Baha may be in violation of his parole.

EXCLUSIVE- Muhiyyidin d' Baha interview- Quintin's Close-Ups™From Governor Henry McMaster to President Donald Trump to issues here in Charleston and North Charleston, Muhiyyidin d' Baha of Charleston Black Lives Matters speaks exclusively to me for this special edition of 'Quintin's Close-Ups'.2017-02-08T00:56:04.000Z

In a September 2015 profile by the New Yorker, d’Baha spoke about his roots in upstate New York, he moved to South Carolina when he was 13. After a troubled youth, d’Baha went to college and studied psychology while also playing football. He spoke about the racial culture in Charleston with regards to the “voices of forgiveness” at a hearing for Dylann Roof, saying:

That was Charleston. That was accommodating white feelings and white superiority. It was ‘Yes, Massa, can I have another?’ But, at the same time, it was spiritual fortitude forged in a crucible of terrorism.

It speaks of a spiritual level that I haven’t attained. What it also meant to Charleston was that, without the families’ backing, we couldn’t demonstrate at the pitch we wanted.

Walter Scott’s mom said the same thing. When the families give these signals, and the pastors instill in the families a sense of grace and forgiveness, the anger never reverberates. No leadership arose demanding to have this pain recognized. Again, it’s let me accommodate you so you’re not scared, we’ll just get on the bridge and hold hands, Jesus is good, we’re over it.

There has been an arrangement here, created over generations, to be able to endure terrorism. At this point, this is the way it is. We endure. We don’t ask for more.