READ: John McCain Blames Confusing Comey Questions on Staying Up Late for Diamondbacks Game

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Arizona Senator John McCain blamed his confusing questions at the James Comey hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on his decision to stay up late to watch the Arizona Diamondbacks. At least he stayed up late to watch the D-Banks beat the San Diego Padres 7-4.

Here’s McCain’s full statement:

“I get the sense from Twitter that my line of questioning today went over people’s heads. Maybe going forward I shouldn’t stay up late watching the Diamondbacks night games.

“What I was trying to get at was whether Mr. Comey believes that any of his interactions with the President rise to the level of obstruction of justice. In the case of Secretary Clinton’s emails, Mr. Comey was willing to step beyond his role as an investigator and state his belief about what ‘no reasonable prosecutor’ would conclude about the evidence. I wanted Mr. Comey to apply the same approach to the key question surrounding his interactions with President Trump—whether or not the President’s conduct constitutes obstruction of justice. While I missed an opportunity in today’s hearing, I still believe this question is important, and I intend to submit it in writing to Mr. Comey for the record.”

In his statement, McCain did try to explain where he was going with his line of questioning. It appeared that he was trying to compare the former FBI director’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email case with his handling of the investigation into Russia’s role in the 2016 presidential election.

In the statement, McCain said he was trying to figure out if Comey believed if President Donald Trump obstructed justice by asking him in February to stop investigating former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.

“In the case of Secretary Clinton’s emails, Mr. Comey was willing to step beyond his role as an investigator and state his belief about what ‘no reasonable prosecutor’ would conclude about the evidence,” the 80-year-old McCain said in his statement. “I wanted Mr. Comey to apply the same approach to the key question surrounding his interactions with President Trump—whether or not the President’s conduct constitutes obstruction of justice. While I missed an opportunity in today’s hearing, I still believe this question is important, and I intend to submit it in writing to Mr. Comey for the record.”

During the hearing, it appeared as if McCain was trying to make a connection between the Clinton case and Russia, but even Comey was confused. On a few occasions, McCain referred to Trump as “Mr. Comey” and even said “President Comey.” Comey had to repeatedly explain to McCain that the Clinton case has been closed since July 2016, while the Russia investigation is ongoing, as far as he knows.

In the testimony the Senate Intelligence Committee released on Wednesday, Comey claimed that the President spoke with him the day after Flynn resigned in February. “I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn
go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go,” Comey claimed the president told him. Comey then wrote that he didn’t tell Trump he would drop the case.

Even though McCain couldn’t quite figure out how to ask Comey if he believed the president’s actions were obstruction of justice, his colleagues did. However, Comey said it wasn’t up to him to determine that.

“I don’t think it’s for me to say whether the conversation I had with the president was an effort to obstruct,” Comey told Chairman Richard Burr. “I took it as a very disturbing thing, very concerning, but that’s a conclusion I’m sure the special counsel will work towards, to try and understand what the intention was there, and whether that’s an offense.”