National Coloring Book Day 2017: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

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National Coloring Book Day 2017 is on August 2, 2017, and it’s not only for children.

“Coloring and coloring books have always been popular with children, but over the years adults have gotten more and more involved. Adult coloring is now a huge trend and many are finding that it is not only fun but also a great way to reduce stress and spend time with friends — or meet new ones,” the site, ColoringBookDay.com, says.

The site urges people to “relax and color” on the day.

Here’s what you need to know:


1. People Are Urged to Color With Family & Friends

National Coloring Book Day is designed to be a social event, if you choose.

On August 2nd, “we invite you to spend some time coloring with your friends, children or grandchildren or by yourself. Enjoy the creativity of making a picture come to life! No matter how you plan on getting involved, you can download free coloring pages,” says ColoringBookDay.com.

“Find a coloring party near you or participate online,” suggests National Day Calendar. “Spend some time coloring with your friends, children or grandchildren or by yourself. Enjoy the creativity of making a picture come to life. Download the official National Coloring Book Day 2017 color page. Post your pictures on social media using #NationalColoringBookDay to encourage others to find the enjoyment in coloring.”


2. People Are Holding Coloring Book Parties

One trend that has taken off surrounding National Coloring Book Day 2017: People are arranging and holding coloring book parties.

Many of the Coloring Book parties organized around the country take place in local libraries, hobby shops, churches, and coffee shops. You can find a list of coloring book parties around the United States here.


3. Coloring Books Were Originally for Adults

Although most people associate coloring books with children these days, it wasn’t always that way. Historically, they were originally for adults.

What were the first coloring books?

According to Time Magazine, “An early variation on coloring books could be the illustrations for two volumes of the very long descriptive poem Poly-Olbion by Michael Drayton, published in 1612 and 1622 (which were republished in 2016 for modern coloring-book aficionados).”

The Guardian reports that it was fashionable in that time period to color. Although the early trend may have been a way to train people in artistry, coloring books grew in popularity. “The 60 plates of engraved flower illustrations in Robert Sayer’s The Florist, published around 1760 in London, really were specifically meant to be colored in by the owner — with emphasis on accuracy,” reports Time.


4. The Emergence of Children’s Coloring Books Stems From Kindergarten

Coloring books became more popular for children as a result of the advent of kindergarten in the United States, according to Time Magazine. They morphed into an educational tool. Time reports that the invention of lithography also fueled the rise of coloring books because it was now possible to “reproduce detailed illustration” more easily and cheaply.

“The first U.S. kindergarten was started in the 1850s,” reports Time, and this “encouraged the early rise of coloring books in the second half of the 19th century.”


5. National Coloring Book Day Was Created in 2015

Dover Publications led the way in founding National Coloring Book Day, which has actually only existed since 2015 (it’s also National Ice Cream Sandwich Day by the way).

“National Coloring Book Day was submitted by Dover Publications in May 2015. The Registrar at National Day Calendar declared National Coloring Book Day to be observed annually on August 2,” reports National Day Calendar.

“Founded in 1941, Dover Publications led the way, releasing their first coloring book for adults, Antique Automobiles Coloring Book, in 1970. Dover now publishes Creative Haven®, a popular line of coloring books specially designed for adult colorists.”

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