Hurricane Harvey San Antonio: Forecast & Path for Aug. 27

National Weather Service The radar in San Antonio late Saturday morning from Hurricane Harvey.

Hurricane Harvey has dissipated from a Category 4 to a tropical storm, but there are dangers to the San Antonio area from strong wind speeds and heavy rainfall. Houston is dealing with severe flooding. What’s expected in San Antonio?

The hurricane made landfall on August 25 in Rockport, Texas, causing damage and injuring at least 10 people, and was moving by about 75 mph as of the next day. Here’s the radar from San Antonio shortly before noon on Sunday, August 27. The bulk of rain remained over Houston.

There are twin concerns for San Antonio: Flooding and wind speeds, including the possibility of tornadoes developing as the storm shifts. On Saturday morning, the City of San Antonio wrote, “Harvey Currently: min power outages, no major incidents, most rain still coming.”

The storm is expected to drift east and then north.

The National Weather Service’s Saturday hazardous weather warning for the area reports, “Hurricane Harvey will meander over southeastern Texas through the middle of next week. This slow movement will produce as much as 3 feet of rainfall in places. This will produce devastating flooding. Winds are continuing to decrease and Harvey is likely to become a tropical storm later today. However, rainfall is the primary threat from Harvey. Remember, ‘Turn Around, Don’t Drown.'”

Harvey’s wind speeds were decreasing but still strong gusts in some areas.

Heavy rainfall was still predicted of 10 to 15 inches east of I-35.

Here were the current wind speeds and rainfall totals for August 27.

There were some street closures:

You can see up-to-the-minute radar for San Antonio here.

Track the hour-by-hour forecast for San Antonio here.

See an updated watch and warning map here.

Here’s a list of updated closings and delays in San Antonio.

The August 27 local weather outlook for San Antonio from the National Weather Service reads as follows:

The center of Harvey has moved very little over the last 6 hours. Currently, the center of the circulation is located in southwestern DeWitt County and is moving to the south-southeast at 2 mph.

Our life-threatening flood event has begun east of the I-35 corridor and Flash Flood Warnings have been issued. Over a foot of rain has fallen over the last 48 hours from Bastrop and Caldwell counties southeast to Bay City. Multiple water rescues, road closures, evacuated homes, and stalled vehicles have been reported across both Bastrop and Caldwell Counties.

Additional rainfall totals of 10-15 inches with isolated areas of 20+ inches are still anticipated in these areas which will likely worsen the flooding in these already impacted areas. Across Travis County, including the city of Austin, two to eight inches of rain has fallen in the last 48 hours with an additional four to eight anticipated through Wednesday. The city of San Antonio has been bisected by the heavy rainfall, being on the western extent of the rain shield. Eastern areas have seen a little over three inches of rainfall where western areas have seen less than an inch. Two to four inches of
additional rainfall is forecast for the city through Wednesday. Winds will gust to 40-50 mph today in the area under the tropical storm warning. Elsewhere wind gusts will be 30-40 mph.

Here’s a wind speed chart for August 26:

Here’s a list of the highest rainfall amounts for August 26:

Here’s an updated map of Bexar County road closings and flooding.

The National Weather Service detailed forecast for San Antonio reads as follows:

Today

“Showers and thunderstorms. High near 79. North wind around 15 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.”

Tonight

“Showers and thunderstorms likely. Cloudy, with a low around 72. North northeast wind around 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a half and three quarters of an inch possible.”

Monday

“Showers and thunderstorms likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 83. North wind around 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a half and three quarters of an inch possible.”

Monday Night

“A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 72. North northeast wind around 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph.”

Tuesday

“A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 84. North northeast wind around 20 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph.”

Tuesday Night

“A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 72. North wind 10 to 20 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph.”

Wednesday

“A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 84. North wind 10 to 15 mph.”

Wednesday Night

“A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 73. North wind 5 to 10 mph.”

Thursday

“A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 87. North northwest wind 5 to 10 mph.”

Thursday Night

“A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 73.”

Friday

“A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 89.”

Friday Night

“A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 73.”

Saturday

“A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 90.”

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