Oregon & Washington Fire Maps: Track Fires Near Me Right Now [August 20]

Oregon and Washington Fire Map Near Me

NWCG.gov

These are the latest details about fires in Oregon and Washington as of Monday, August 20 to help you track the fires’ locations, containment details, and updates. You can see an interactive map of the Oregon and Washington fires here, provided by Oregon.gov, or view details from NIFC.gov here. Another interactive map is here.

In Oregon, according to NIFC, there are 13 active fires today, totaling 231,278 acres. In Washington there are 10 fires today, totaling 91,604 acres. Read on for details about active fires in Oregon and Washington, according to NIFC.gov and other sources. You can also see an interactive map of southern Oregon specifically, detailing evacuation areas, here.

See an interactive fire map of the two states below:

Here’s another real-time fire map via Public RAPTOR for the Oregon area:

Here are details on the individual fires for August 20.


Arctic Jim Fire

This North Cascades National Park fire in Washington is 340 acres and 0 percent contained, according to NIFC. It’s two miles southwest of White Swan.


Bannock Lakes Fire

This Washington fire in the Okanogan/Wenatchee National Forest is 444 acres and 0 percent contained as of August 20. It’s remained about the same size for several days. The fire is 17 miles west of Stehekin in Glaciar Peaks Wilderness. Inciweb is covering this fire alongside the Cougar Creek Fire and the Lost Fire. Inciweb’s latest update for the Bannock Lakes fire was August 18.

This tweet is older but gives you an idea of where the fire is:

The fire was caused by lightning and is in the Glacier Peaks Wilderness. It’s burning among “large rocky outcroppings and isolated clusters of timber in steep, inaccessible terrain,” Inciweb reported. ” The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCT) is closed from Suiattle Pass to High Bridge. The PCT detour is from Suiattle Pass to Stehekin. More information and a map is available at http://www.pcta.org. Aerial observers continue to monitor the fire.”


Boffer Fire

This Washington fire was 5,000 acres and 50 percent contained as of August 12, according to TheNWFireBlog. It’s two miles south of Kennewick. As of August 20, NIFC does not list this fire and there are no other sources reporting on this fire, so its current status isn’t known.


Boyds Fire

This Washington fire in the Northeast Region is 3,249 acres and 49 percent contained as of August 20, which is a significant containment increase of about 20 percent in just a few days. It’s 3 miles west of Kettle Falls (at 48.602 latitude, -118.141 longitude). The cause of the fire is unknown.

On August 20, Inciweb noted the following about evacuation levels: “All areas from Boulder Creek Road south to Sherman Homes Road, will continue at a Level 2 evacuation. This evacuation level designation does not mean that the fire is out and these areas are out of danger. The public should be prepared to leave at a moment’s notice.”

A Red Cross Shelter was set up at the Kettle Falls High School.


Cedar Creek Fire

This Washington fire is mostly contained, according to the Northeast Washington Fire Information page. 


Columbus Fire

Miles Columbus Round Top and Snow Shoe Fire Map

InciwebMiles Columbus Round Top and Snow Shoe Fire Map

This Oregon fire is overseen by the Umpqua National Forest. It’s 9,685 acres and 29 percent contained as of August 19. It’s located 15 miles east of Tiller and is being updated by Inciweb under the Miles Fire information page.

See the details under the Miles Fire for more evacuation information.


Cougar Creek Fire

Cougar Creek Fire Map

InciwebCougar Creek Fire Map

This Washington fire is now 37,775 acres and 35 percent contained as of August 19 at 10 p.m. It’s 8 miles northwest of Manson, 12 miles northwest of Ardenvior, 7 1/2 miles northeast of Plain, and 20 miles northwest of Entiat. It was caused by lightning.

The following update was shared by Inciweb on August 20: “A change in prevailing winds pushed the fire in a southwesterly direction Saturday night and Sunday, leading to a Level 1 (BE READY) Advisory Notification for areas west of the Cougar Creek Fire. While smoke continues to be a major concern, and limits the use of aircraft in fighting fire, it did have a moderating effect on fire behavior and temperatures yesterday. On the eastern flank of the fire, crews continued with mop-up and structure protection. To the west, firefighters were actively engaged along the primary containment lines while continuing to construct and improve alternate and contingency lines.”

Inciweb reported the following about evacuation levels on August 20:

  • “A Level 1 Fire Advisory Notification was issued for Chumstick Rd north of Merry Canyon (both sides of the road), Merry Canyon; Second Creek and Moon Canyon, community of Plain, including Ponderosa Estates, Plain River Rd and other subdivisions, Chiwawa Loop Rd to include Chiwawa River Pines, and all of the Fish Lake and Lake Wenatchee areas to Coles Corner.
  • “Entiat River Road north from Mad River Road to the end of Entiat River Road, Ardenvoir, and Mad River Road is at Evacuation Level 2. While roadblocks will not be staffed, deputies will patrol the valley and strictly enforce the lower speed limit of 25 mph.
  • “Entiat River Road from Crum Canyon north to Ardenvoir and all of Crum Canyon Road is at Evacuation Level 1.”

For specific questions and updates regarding evacuations please call the Chelan County Emergency Management at 509-667-6863 or visit their Facebook page. Red Cross can be contacted at 509-663-3907 for


Coyote Creek Fire

This Oregon fire in the Vale District is 598 acres and 90 percent contained, according to NIFC. It’s 15 miles south of Jordan Valley.


Crescent Mountain Fire

This Washington fire is 23,764 acres. Inciweb notes that containment is at 34 percent as of August 20.  It’s 18 miles west of Winthrop. It was caused by lightning. It consumed what was originally the Gilbert Fire as of August 9. The fire started on July 29 in the headwaters of the Twisp River, about 21 miles from Twisp, Washington in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. (The map above is a progression map for both the Crescent Mountain Fire and the McLeod Fire.) The cause of the fire is unknown.

The fire is on Snowshoe Ridge, and it’s continuing to move south on the west side of the Twisp River, north of Eagle Creek. You can stay updated on the fire’s official Facebook page.

According to the fire’s official Facebook page, the following evacuations are in place as of August 20:

  • “A Level 3 evacuation is in place for West Buttermilk Creek Road and Twisp River Road, west of the Buttermilk Creek intersection. Level 3 means all residents in the affected area need to evacuate NOW.
  • “There is a Level 2 evacuation in place for residences west of Little Bridge Creek Road.
  • “No evacuations are in effect for the McLeod Fire.
  • “Closures: The Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest has issued several closure orders. Maps and information on the closures can be found on the fire’s InciWeb page. See temporary flight restriction details at the Federal Aviation Administration’s website.
  • “Area businesses are open. Please consider showing your support by shopping in the local communities.”

The Red Cross will have an evacuation shelter at Methow Valley Community Center.

Visit the Okanogan County Emergency Management website at https://okanogandem.org/ for updated evacuation details. Click on the map icon and type in your address to see if you’re affected by current evacuations.

A community meeting for both the Crescent Mountain Fire and the McLeod fire will take place Tuesday night, August 21, at the Methow Valley Community Center at 6:30 p.m.


Grass Valley Fire

This Spokane District Washington fire was 75,573 acres and 87 percent contained as of August 16. It’s 16 miles southwest of Grand Coulee. Significant strides were made in containing this fire.

All evacuations were lifted for this fire.


Grizz Fire

Horns Mountain, West Hubbard, and Grizz Fire Maps

InciwebHorns Mountain, West Hubbard, and Grizz Fire Maps

This Washington fire is five acres as of August 19 and is in patrol status, Inciweb reported. Inciweb is updating details on the same page as the Horns Mountain Fire.


Hendrix Fire

This Oregon fire is 1,082 acres, 90 percent contained according to the fire’s official Facebook page as of August 19. (Inicweb and NIFC are no longer updating details about this fire.) It’s 3 to 9 miles southwest of Ashland. The fire was caused by lightning.

On August 20 the Forest Service noted: “The evacuation level remains at Level 1 for the Jackson County Hendrix Fire evacuation area. Level 1 means BE READY for potential evacuation. Residents should be vigilant and monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information.”

As of August 20, “the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest Hendrix Fire Area Closure for the southern portion of the Siskiyou Mountains Ranger District remains in effect,” the Forest Service noted.

For the latest information, go to http://jacksoncountyor.org/sheriff/. Residents in the area are encouraged to sign up for Citizen Alert at http://www.jacksoncounty.org/alert. More information about evacuation levels and preparedness can be found at http://www.rvem.org. You can also follow the Hendrix Fire Facebook page.

The fire’s Facebook page will no longer be providing updates after August 20 unless needed, due to successful containment efforts.


Highway 18 Fire

This is not on NIFC’s list. On August 20, an emergency call was made about a brush fire in the 25000 block of 188th Avenue S.E. in Covington, Washington, reported TheNWFireBlog. The fire was threatening a home on Sunday evening, and a helicopter responded with a water drop, along with other fire officials. Later that night the fire was reduced to a smoldering state.


Horns Mountain Fire

Horns Mountain, West Hubbard, and Grizz Fire Maps

InciwebHorns Mountain, West Hubbard, and Grizz Fire Maps

This Washington fire in Colville National Forest is 2,413 acres, with 1,998 acres in Washington and 415 acres in British Columbia as of August 19 at 9:55 p.m. The fire is 25 percent contained.

It was caused by lightning and is 12 miles north of Northport, Washington at 48.98 latitude, -118.051 longitude, according to Inciweb. Inciweb noted: “Yesterday, US crews coordinated with their Canadian counterparts to ensure that control lines on the US side will connect with lines constructed by BCWS crews when they meet at the border. They will then prepare these control lines for future burning operations. Removing fuels ahead of the main fire creates a barrier. When the fire reaches this barrier, there are no fuels to ignite, and the fire cannot advance.”

For updates call 505-302-5008 and leave a message for a return call.

The following closures are in place as of August 20, per Inciweb:

  •  Fire restrictions are in effect and residents and visitors are encouraged to check local regulations before burning.
  • Portions of the Colville National Forest affected by fire suppression operations are closed for the safety of firefighters and the public. See the Colville National Forest website at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/colville/alerts-notices
  • Sheep Creek Road and Sheep Creek Campground are closed until further notice.

The map above is the latest map for the fire.


Kelly Mountain Fire

This fire isn’t on NIFC’s official list, but it is a fire in Washington. Great progress has been made on the fire so far. It’s 44 acres, 55 percent contained as of August 20, and was caused by lightning. It’s located at 48.815 latitude, -118.798 longitude. The fire started on August 11.

According to the Northeast Washington Fire Information page on August 20, the fire is south of Kelly Mountain, about 12 miles north of Republic. No structures or residences are threatened at this time.


Kettle River Fire

Kettle River Fire Map

InciwebKettle River Fire Map

This Washington fire isn’t on NIFC’s official list. It’s 49 acres and 75 percent contained as of August 20, about the same size it’s been for the last few days but with increasing containment. It’s on the NW corner of Ferry County in the Graphite Mountain area, and about two miles south of the Midway border crossing, 10 miles northwest of Curlew, according to Inciweb. It was caused by lightning on August 11. It’s at 48.97 latitude, -118.78 longitude.

About 40 structures in the area are on a Level 1 evacuation status (Get Ready.) Evacuation updates will be posted on Ferry County Sheriff’s Facebook page.


Kinzua Complex Fire

This Oregon fire, overseen by the John Day Unit of the Department of Forestroy, is 611 acres and 0 percent contained. It’s located 12 miles east of Fossil.


Klondike Fire

Klondike and Taylor Fire Map August 19

InciwebKlondike and Taylor Fire Map August 19

This Oregon fire has been split into two “zones” as of August 19: the Taylor Creek and Klondike East fires and the Klondike West Fire. The cause is lightning. Increased fire activity is still expected. Dry fuels and hot, dry weather have fueled both this fire’s and Taylor Creek’s growth. Inaccessible and steep terrain have made suppression a challenge. Both fires are actively burning in the scar of the 2002 Biscuit Fire, according to Inciweb, which has helped the fires spread west.

Here’s another map as of August 20 with a slightly different angle:

Taylor Creek Klondike Fire Maps August 20

Taylor Creek Klondike Fire Maps August 20

As of August 20, the Taylor Creek Fire is 52,588 acres and 79 percent contained. The Klondike Fire is 72,074 acres and 28 percent contained (up from 15 percent containment yesterday.)

You can see an interactive map of evacuation levels here. Just enter your address to see if you are under an evacuation advisory.

Inciweb noted on August 20: “Extremely dry fuels and hot, dry weather have fueled the continued growth of both fires. Steep, rugged, inaccessible terrain combined with limited resources due to intense wildfire activity across the western United States has made suppression efforts a challenge. In addition, smoky conditions have limited the use of aircraft to suppress and monitor both fires.”

A public meeting about the fires is August 20 at 6 p.m. in the Agness Community Library in Agness. There will be another public meeting on August 21 in Gold Beach at the Curry County Fairgrounds in the Curry Showcase Building on 29392 Ellensburg Avenue.

The Klondike Fire and the Taylor Creek Fire are being managed by the Pacific Northwest Team 2.


Lonerock 1057 RN Fire

This Oregon fire, managed by South Gilliam County Rural Fire, is 4,500 acres and 20 percent contained. It’s 7 miles northwest of Condon.


Lost Fire

This Washington fire is 114 acres. Not much more is known about it at this time, but it’s being updated on the Cougar Creek Inciweb fire page. Closures for this fire are the same as the Cougar Creek fire.


Maple Fire

This Washington Fire is in the Olympic National Forest. It’s 1,779 acres and 41 percent contained as of August 20, located 10 miles north of Hoordsport, 23 miles north of Shelton, and five miles west of Highway 101. It was caused by human activity and is located at 47.578 latitude, -123.13 longitude.

There are no evacuations currently in place for this fire. Because of increasing containment, Inciweb will no longer be providing daily updates for the fire.

The following closures are in place as of August 19, according to Inciweb:

  • “Due to the active fire in the area, recreationists hoping to hike the Lena Creek Trail over Labor Day weekend are being asked to plan a different destination. This popular trailhead lies within the established closure area based on proximity to the fire. The Hamma Hamma Road 25 that accesses this area is CLOSED. Other road closures include Forest Roads 2502, 2421, 2401 and 2441.
  • “CLOSED Olympic National Forest recreation sites include Living Legacy Interpretive Loop (#802), Upper/Lena Lake Trail (#810 and #811), Beaver Pond Loop (#815), Putvin Trail (#813), Mildred Lakes Trail (#822), Jefferson Ridge/Lakes Trail (#808), and Upper/Lower Elk Lake Trail (#805). Facility closures include Hamma Hamma Cabin & Campground; Lena Creek and Lena Lake Campgrounds…
  • “To discover new forest sites still open for recreation, visit the Olympic National Forest website or visit its Facebook site at Olympic National Forest Facebook.”

For updates, see the fire’s official Facebook page.


McLeod Fire

This Washington fire in Okanogan/Wenatchee National Forest is 10,040 acres and 0 percent contained, according to the Forest Service on August 19 (but some other sources say it is 11,663 acres according to an infrared flight.) It’s 8 miles North of Mazama. It was first reported on August 11.

On August 19, the Forest Service noted: “Heavy smoke conditions and shading on the fire led to moderate fire behavior… Crews will continue improving fire line south of the fire.”

Evacuations are in place for the nearby Crescent Mountain Fire (see the listing above for details), but not for the McLeod Fire.

A community meeting for both the Crescent Mountain Fire and the McLeod fire will take place Tuesday night, August 21, at the Methow Valley Community Center at 6:30 p.m.


Meninick Pass Fire

This Washington fire, overseen by the Yakima Agency, is 5,537 acres and 90 percent contained. It’s five miles south of White Swan. The final update was issued on Inciweb on August 19.


Milepost 6 Fire

This Oregon fire, managed by the Ochoco National Forest, is 1,500 acres and 50 percent contained. It’s six miles south of Madras.


Miles Fire (Formerly Called Sugar Pine Fire)

Miles Columbus Round Top and Snow Shoe Fire Map

InciwebMiles Columbus Round Top and Snow Shoe Fire Map

This Oregon fire is 47,015 acres and 38 percent contained as of August 20, according to Inciweb. It’s being managed by the Umpqua National Forest and is five miles northeast of Trail. It was started by lightning on July 15, and later merged with the Sugar Pine fire.

Authorities downgraded some evacuation notices for this fire last week, KDRV reported.

The following evacuations details were noted on August 19 and 20:

  • “Fire-related evacuation advisories and closures remain in effect to ensure the safety of firefighters, residents, and the public.
  • “For evacuation information, visit https://bit.ly/2uUku2C.” (This is an interactive map that will tell you if your region is under evacuation orders.)
  • “Evacuees seeking assistance may contact the American Red Cross at (888) 680-1455. The shelter is currently on standby at Eagle Point High School.”

If you have specific questions about the fire, call 541-474-5305.


Miriam Fire

Miriam Fire Map

InciwebMiriam Fire Map

This Washington fire is 3,146 acres and 30 percent contained as of August 20. It’s 15 miles east of Packwood and 2 miles southeast of White Pass, in the Okanogan/Wenatchee National Forest. It was caused by lightning.

Inciweb noted on August 20: ” Evacuation levels remain the same. The need for these levels are evaluated daily. Please see the Yakima County Office of Emergency Management Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/yakimacountyoem for a full description.”

Here is an evacuation map from Yakima on August 15:

Closures, according to Inciweb on August 20, are:

  • “Area Closures are in effect on the Okanogan-Wenatchee and Gifford Pinchot National Forests for safety to the public and firefighters. Find maps and a list of affected sites at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6066/
  • “Fire managers are aware of the upcoming hunting seasons and closures will be assessed frequently. The PCT is closed from Elk Pass to White Pass. A detour is available. Please see the Pacific Crest Trail Association website at https://www.pcta.org/discover-the-trail/closures/ for current closure maps.
  • “A TFR remains in place over the two fire areas as a safety precaution to aerial firefighting resources. Please consult the notice to airmen for specifications.
  • “Local businesses remain open. Please consider showing your support by shopping in the local communities.”

Stay updated here or here.


Natchez Fire

Natchez Fire Map August 20

InciwebNatchez Fire Map August 20

This Oregon fire falls under the jurisdiction of the Oregon Department of Forestry Fire, but is also listed on the CAL FIRE map. It’s grown to total 20.275 acres acres on August 20, and 70 percent contained. It was caused by lightning. It’s located 15 miles southeast of Cave Junction, Oregon, located on the Oregon/California border between Happy Camp, California and Cave Junction, Oregon. Some active surface spread is still expected.

On August 20, Inciweb still reported the following regarding evacuation orders and fire closures:

  • “The community of Sunstar remains in a Level 1 evacuation Ready status. Del Norte County, CA, including the community of Sunstar, has adopted the Oregon three level evacuation process.
  • “Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office has expanded an Evacuation Order for the area south of the Natchez Fire. The expanded law enforcement order can be obtained directly from the Sheriff’s Office Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/SiskiyouCountySheriff/.
  • “The emergency closure area surrounding the Natchez Fire was expanded on August 17th. The expansion was necessary due to fire growth on the southern end. Going into or being on National Forest lands, roads, or trails within the closure area is prohibited. Forest Road No. 48, known as Grayback Road, remains open to public use.
  • “The new boundary for the emergency closure area begins at the intersection of Forest Road 48 (Grayback Road) and the common boundary between the Klamath National Forest boundary and the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, then continues southeasterly along the western edge of Grayback Road to its intersection with Highway 96, then continues southwest along the northern edge of Highway 96 to its intersection with Forest Road No. 17N16 (Benjamin Creek Road), then continues on Forest Road No. 16N10 (Oak Flat Road). From that point the emergency closure boundary follows a northwesterly direction up to the boundary between the Klamath National Forest and the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest. A full description and map of the closure area is available on Inciweb at: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/5948/.
  • Closure Order for Rogue River – Siskiyou National Forest within the vicinity of the Natchez Fire. Going into or being upon National Forest System lands within the Natchez Fire Closure Area is prohibited. Information and maps about closures for River-Siskiyou National Forest can be found at: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/5948/.”

A community fire meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, August 21 at 6 p.m. at the Grange in Happy Camp, CA.


Roundtop & Snow Shoe Fires

Miles Columbus Round Top and Snow Shoe Fire Map

InciwebMiles Columbus Round Top and Snow Shoe Fire Map

The Snowshoe and Round Top Oregon fires are in the Umpqua National Forest. The Snow Shoe fire is 3,816 acres and 100 percent contained. The Rond Top fire is 154 acres and 100 percent contained, as of August 19.  Neither Roundtop nor Snow Shoe are listed on NIFC anymore due to containment efforts.

See the details under the Miles Fire for more evacuation information.


Seal 1045 RN Fire

This Oregon fire, overseen by the South Gilliam County Rural Fire department, is 8,000 acres and 15 percent contained. It’s 14 miles west of Condon.


Stubblefield 1008RN Fire

This Oregon fire is being managed by the South Gilliam County Rural Fire department. It’s 18,000 acres and 20 percent contained. It’s seven miles northwest of Condon.


Taylor Creek Fire

Klondike and Taylor Fire Map August 19

InciwebKlondike and Taylor Fire Map August 19

Once considered part of the Garner Complex Fire which is now considered contained, this Oregon fire is being managed separately, according to Inciweb, alongside the Klondike Fire. If you have not signed up for Josephine County Citizen’s Alert, Josephine County’s emergency notification system, you can sign up on line at www.rvem.org. The fire is 10 miles west of Grants Pass.

The Oregon fires have been split into two “zones” as of August 19: the Taylor creek and Klondike East fires and the Klondike West Fire. The cause is lightning. Increased fire activity is still expected. Dry fuels and hot, dry weather have fueled both this fire’s and Taylor Creek’s growth. Inaccessible and steep terrain have made suppression a challenge. Both fires are actively burning in the scar of the 2002 Biscuit Fire, according to Inciweb, which has helped the fires spread west.

As of August 20, the Taylor Creek Fire is 52,588 acres and 79 percent contained. The Klondike Fire is 72,074 acres and 28 percent contained (up from 15 percent containment yesterday.)

You can see an interactive map of evacuation levels here. Just enter your address to see if you are under an evacuation advisory.

A public meeting about the fires is August 20 at 6 p.m. in the Agness Community Library in Agness. There will be another public meeting on August 21 in Gold Beach at the Curry County Fairgrounds in the Curry Showcase Building on 29392 Ellensburg Avenue.

The following roads are closed: Bear Camp Road and Peavine Road.

Inciweb noted on August 20: “Extremely dry fuels and hot, dry weather have fueled the continued growth of both fires. Steep, rugged, inaccessible terrain combined with limited resources due to intense wildfire activity across the western United States has made suppression efforts a challenge. In addition, smoky conditions have limited the use of aircraft to suppress and monitor both fires.”

The Klondike Fire and the Taylor Creek Fire are being managed by the Pacific Northwest Team 2.


Terwilliger Fire

This Williamette National Forest fire in Oregon is 110 acres and 0 percent contained. It’s 5 miles southeast of Blue River, north of Terwilliger Hot Springs. The cause is under investigation.

Inciweb noted on August 19: “Conditions are exceptionally dry causing the fire to grow quickly.”


Tillman Surprise Fire

This Washington fire is not on NIFC’s list, but it is being reported on by Northeast Washington Fire Information’s Facebook page. It’s 45 acres and 15 percent contained, located in the Loomis State Forest about 11 miles west of Loomis, Washington. It was first seen on August 16. No structures are threatened. The public is asked to avoid Cecil Creek Road, but there are no evacuations at this time.


Watson Creek Fire

Watson Creek Fire Map August 20

InciwebWatson Creek Fire Map August 20

This Oregon fire is overseen by the Fremont-Winema National Forest. It’s 25,778 acres and 0 percent contained, 13 miles west of Paisley. It ballooned in size in just a couple days and the cause is under investigation. It’s at 42.653 latitude, -120.818 longitude. It’s located on the Paisley Ranger District of the Fremont-Winema National Forest and was first seen on August 15.

According to Inciweb on August 20, the following evacuations are in place:

  • “The Lake County Sheriff issued a Level 3 (GO) evacuation for approximately 15 homes in the Lakeview Estates neighborhood just north of Campbell and Deadhorse Lakes in the Fremont-Winema National Forest yesterday. That is still in effect today.”
  • “Level 3 Evacuations for Lakeview Estates, located just north of Campbell and Deadhorse Lakes in the Fremont-Winema National Forest. . Evacuations at this time are nearly complete! The fire is currently burning 1-2 miles north of the area. The Lake County Sheriff’s Office appreciates everyone’s cooperation for an orderly evacuation, and for staying out of the fire area for emergency personnel safety.”

The following Facebook pages are providing updates:  SCOFMPFireInfo or R6FWNF.


West Hubbard Fire

Horns Mountain, West Hubbard, and Grizz Fire Maps

InciwebHorns Mountain, West Hubbard, and Grizz Fire Maps

This Washington fire near Northport is 9 acres, located on steep slopes. Inciweb is updating details on the same page as the Horns Mountain Fire. As of August 19 it’s in patrol status.