Tropical Storm Barry: Live Radar, Satellites & Streams to Track Storm

Watch Live: Radar Tracks Tropical Storm Barry As It Heads Towards Gulf Coast | NBC NewsWatch live coverage as NBC weather radar tracks Tropical Storm Barry as it moves towards the Gulf coast in the southern U.S. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet…2019-07-12T03:27:48.000Z

Tropical Storm Barry is moving closer to Louisiana, possibly bringing torrential rain to an already flooded state. The storm is expected to hit the coast late on Friday or early Saturday. The best way to track the storm’s movement is through live streams and live radars. We have a collection below that you can watch in order to keep track of the storm’s movements. Some streams may go down periodically, so this post will be updated with new streams as needed. The first video above is a live radar from NBC News.


Live Radars & Coverage

The storm could bring as much as 10 to 20 inches of rain. The storm is moving slowly. As of 10 a.m. Central, it was moving 5 mph. The slow movement could bring about more flooding once it makes landfall. The video below is from Shoals Weather.

Tropical Depression Barry Live StreamMore info at shoalsweather.net2019-07-11T22:56:36.000Z

According to NOAA, the storm was at 28.2 N and 90.4 W as of 10 a.m. Central, and 100 miles southwest of the Mississippi River. Maximum sustained winds were 65 mph.

Below, WWLTV has live coverage.

Tropical Storm Barry New Orleans live coverage from WWL-TVBreaking Live News Coverage Follow WWL-TV on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WWLTV | Twitter: https://twitter.com/WWLTV2019-07-12T09:14:55.000Z

Hurricane warnings are in effect for the Intracoastal City to Grand Isle, and Tropical Storm warnings are in effect for the mouth of the Pearl River to Grand Isle, for Intracoastal City to Cameron, and for Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas, including metropolitan New Orleans. Hurricane watches, tropical storm watches, and storm surge watches and warnings are also in effect.

Here is live coverage from wxTV including radars mixed with shots of roads and beaches in the path of the storm.

Tropical Storm Barry – Live Hurricane Coverage on wxTVLive coverage on wxTV. Music: Bush Week by Nihilore https://soundcloud.com/nihilore Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/UroytzJSVx4 Future Gladiator by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) In a Heartbeat by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license…2019-07-10T19:58:57.000Z

Tropical force winds extend up to 175 miles from the center of the storm.

And below is a hurricane camera in New Orleans provided by CCC Live. This periodically goes down, so we’re providing it as long as it lasts.

! New Orleans Cam Live Stream WebcamUS Army corps of engineers carrollton gauge mississippi river http://rivergages.mvr.usace.army.mil/WaterControl/stationinfo2.cfm?dt=S&sid=013002019-07-12T02:21:13.000Z

The storm’s 65 mph winds as of 10 a.m. Central aren’t strong enough for hurricane status, although it still might strengthen to a Category 1 before landfall. The main concern from this storm is flooding damage as opposed to wind damage.

NOAA estimated that parts of Louisiana and the Mississippi coast might see as much as 20 inches of rain, along with flash flooding.

Barry is currently predicted to land west of New Orleans, which would put the city in the areas where rains fall the most from tropical storms, The New York Times noted. Morgan City could be the point of landfall, so residents are gathering supplies, including sandbags.

The New York Times noted that 118 out of 120 of New Orleans’ pumps should be working, but heavy rain can overcome the city’s drainage capacity. If the local power goes down, that could also hurt the situation. Mayor LaToya Cantrell said: “We cannot pump our way out of the water levels and the water falls that are expected to hit the city of New Orleans. We need you to understand this, and again be prepared to shelter in place.”

Officials are also keeping a close eye on expected storm surges from Barry.