Peter King, The MMQB: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Peter King

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Peter King, a writer for Sports Illustrated, has become famous for his weekly column, “Monday Morning Quarterback.” Here’s what you need to know about him.

1. He Has Been at Sports Illustrated for 25 Years

Peter King, Harry Carson

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Peter King was born on June 10, 1957 in Springfield, Massachusetts. After graduating from Ohio University’s E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, King was a writer for The Cincinnati Enquirer from 1980 to 1985 and Newsday from 1985 to 1989. He then joined Sports Illustrated in 1989, where he has been since.

2. He Has Other Duties Outside of MMQB

Peter King

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In addition to his role at Sports Illustrated, King also works for several other outlets.

In 2006, NBC started a studio show called Football Night in America, set between the end of the Sunday afternoon games, and the primetime Sunday Night Football. King joined the lineup of Bob Costas, Cris Collinsworth, Sterling Sharpe and Jerome Bettis, serving as a special “insider” reporter and analyst for the show, highlighting major topics from that day.

He is also the author of five books on football. These include ‘Inside the Helmet’ (1993), ‘Football: A History of the Professional Game’ (1993), ‘Football’ (1997), ‘Greatest Quarterbacks’ (1999) and ‘Sports Illustrated Monday Morning Quarterback: A fully caffeinated guide to everything you need to know about the NFL'(2009).

3. He’s Active in the Community

King is also active in the community. He recently tweeted to his followers to come help out with “Fare Share Friday” the day after Thanksgiving. According to its website, “Fare Share Friday is a celebration where the soup kitchen regulars, volunteers and supporters of Crossroads Community sit down to share a meal. Held on November 28, 2014, the day after Thanksgiving, an extraordinary meal will be prepared at 4 PM and 7 PM by Chef David Garcelon, The Waldorf Astoria New York, and Chef Jacques Sorci, The New York Palace.

Proceeds will go towards supporting the soup kitchen, food pantry and homeless shelter of Crossroads Community in New York City.”

4. He Apologized for His Ray Rice Coverage

Ray Rice, Baltimore Ravens

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On July 29, King wrote that “NFL and some Ravens officials” had seen unreleased security-cam footage of the Ray Rice altercation from within the elevator.” He later wrote an addendum to this story when TMZ released the video.

Earlier this summer a source I trusted told me he assumed the NFL had seen the damaging video that was released by TMZ on Monday morning of Rice slugging his then-fiancée, Janay Palmer, in an Atlantic City elevator. The source said league officials had to have seen it. This source has been impeccable, and I believed the information. So I wrote that the league had seen the tape. I should have called the NFL for a comment, a lapse in reporting on my part. The league says it has not seen the tape, and I cannot refute that with certainty. No one from the league has ever knocked down my report to me, and so I was surprised to see the claim today that league officials have not seen the tape.

I hope when this story is fully vetted, we all get the truth and nothing but the truth.

5. He Has Two Daughters

Peter King

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King and his wife Ann, who is a native of the Pittsburgh area, live in Montclair, New Jersey. They also have two daughters, Laura and Mary Beth.

In 2006, the site Kissing Suzy Kobler posted pictures of Mary Beth, that appeared to be taken from her Facebook page, and she appeared to be intoxicated. King, understandably, was not happy. Kissing Suzy Kobler then took the pictures down. But the site retaliated against King.

“Here’s the deal, Peter King: we’re tired of you writing about the details of your life in your otherwise very enjoyable NFL column. … Honestly, your column has become an insufferable, scattershot, imperious bore. Regular readers of Monday Morning Quarterback have now been subjected to your coffee habit, your green tea habit, your TV show preferences, your massive airport bowel movements, your torch-carrying for post-Katrina New Orleans, your complaints about coach seating on airlines, your correspondence with deployed servicemen and the goings-on of your family, most notably your athletic daughter Mary Beth.”