How to Watch Oklahoma Football Online Without Cable [2018]

Watch Oklahoma Football Online

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Having to replace one of the most prolific quarterbacks in college football history, No. 7 Oklahoma is one of the biggest unknowns at the top of preseason rankings, but as always, the Sooners’ talent gives them a national championship ceiling in 2018.

Every Oklahoma football game will be broadcast nationally on one of the following channels: Fox, Fox Sports 1, ABC, ESPN, ESPN2 or ESPNU (full schedule). Fortunately, even if you don’t have cable or a TV, you can watch one, some or all of these channels by signing up for one of the following cable-free, live TV streaming services:

Hulu With Live TV: Includes Fox, Fox Sports 1, ABC, ESPN, ESPN2, and ESPNU

Sling TV: Includes Fox, Fox Sports 1, ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPNU (ABC is not technically in their channel package, but those games can be watched on ESPN’s digital platforms with a Sling TV log-in)

All of these services allow you to watch live TV without a cable box or satellite or annual contract. All you need is an internet connection. Here’s a rundown of what they include, how to sign up, and how to watch a live stream of every Oklahoma game in 2018:

Hulu With Live TV

Hulu With Live TV

Hulu

Hulu with Live TV offers the perfect mix of entertainment and live sports for cord-cutters. Not only does it come with an extensive Netflix-like library of on-demand TV shows (Seinfeld, It’s Always Sunny, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, etc.) and movies, but it also gives you every channel that will broadcast an Oklahoma football game in 2018.

Getting all that, including DVR, for $40 per month is great value.

Oklahoma Football Channels Included: Fox (live in select markets), FS1, ABC (live in select markets), ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU. There are a total of 50-plus channels included, as well as Hulu’s on-demand streaming library (a $7.99 or $11.99 per month value).

Pricing Options: Hulu With Live TV (with the “Limited Commercials” on-demand plan): $39.99 per month | Hulu With Live TV (with the “No Commercials” on-demand library plan): $43.99 per month

Extras: The regular Hulu With Live TV plan allows you to watch on two different devices at the same time, but you can watch on unlimited screens at the same time for $15 per month extra; 50 hours of cloud DVR is included, but you can upgrade to 200 hours of enhanced cloud DVR for $15 per month.

How to Sign Up: Go to the Hulu website and select “Sign Up Now”. After creating an account, select your channel package and any extras you want, then enter your payment information.

How & Where to Watch: If you want to watch on your computer, simply return to the Hulu website and select “Start Watching” at the top of the page, and then “Live TV.” Scroll to whatever channel you want to start watching live TV.

If you want to watch on your phone, tablet or other streaming device, you can do so via the Hulu app, which is free to download for the following devices: Amazon Fire TV or TV Stick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Roku, Android phones and tablets, iPads and iPhones, Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, select Smart TV’s and other devices.

Additionally, OU games that are on ABC or any of the ESPN channels can also be watched on your computer via ESPN.com, or on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the ESPN app. You’ll need to log in to a cable provider to watch this way, but you can use your Hulu credentials to do that.


Sling TV

The first to dive into the cable-free, live-TV streaming service, Sling TV’s biggest selling point continues to be its low price point. However, while the basic “Sling Orange” or “Sling Blue” is a cheap entry point, you need to get both base packages to get most of the channels that will show Oklahoma football games, which adds up to $40 per month ($45 if you want DVR, and $55 if you want ESPNU).

In the end, it’s just not as good of a value as Hulu with Live TV.

Oklahoma Football Channels Included: ESPN and ESPN2 are part of the “Sling Orange” bundle, Fox and Fox Sports 1 are part of the “Sling Blue” bundle, and ESPNU is in the “Sports Extra” add-on

Price: Sling Orange: $25 per month | Sling Blue: $25 per month | Sling Orange + Blue: $40 per month | Sports Extra add-on: $10 per month ($5 per month if you add it to just Sling Orange)

Extras: Watch on one device at once with Sling Orange or Sling Orange+Blue; Watch on three devices at once with Sling Blue; 50 hours of cloud DVR is $5 per month extra.

How to Sign Up: Go to the Sling TV website and select “Watch Now 7 Days Free.” After creating an account, select your channel package and any extras you want, then enter your payment information to sign up.

How & Where to Watch: If you want to watch on your computer, just return to the Sling TV website and navigate to your desired channel to start watching live TV. If you want to watch on your phone, tablet or other streaming device, you can do so via the Sling TV app, which is free to download for the following devices: Amazon Fire TV or TV Stick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Roku, Android phones and tablets, iPads and iPhones, Fire tablets, and Xbox One.

Additionally, OU games that are on ABC or any of the ESPN channels can also be watched on your computer via ESPN.com, or on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the ESPN app. You’ll need to log in to a cable provider to watch this way, but you can use your Sling TV credentials to do that.


Season Preview

The surprising retirement of Bob Stoops and subsequent hiring of Lincoln Riley made no difference last year: The Sooners still won 12 games, advanced to the college football playoff, were painfully close to a trip to the title game, and finished inside the Top 5 for the third year in a row.

But now they must adjust to life without Baker Mayfield, the flag-plantin’, crotch-grabbin’, Heisman-winnin’ assassin who averaged a silly 10.6 yards per attempt with an even sillier 119:21 TD:INT ratio while leading the Sooners to those Top-5 finishes each of the last three seasons.

The man to replace Mayfield? That would be the No. 9 overall pick in the 2018 MLB draft.

That’s right, Kyler Murray, who was just drafted ninth by the Oakland Athletics, will play one more season of college football before turning his attention to baseball for good. He was able to win the job over redshirt sophomore Austin Kendall.

“There weren’t a lot of differentiating factors in the end because both did play so well and so efficiently, but just felt like from an overall perspective that Kyler was just a little bit ahead,” Riley said.

“We feel like we’ve got a great quarterback tandem there and we’re really proud of the way that Austin has improved through the redshirt year last year and during camp. We’re excited for Kyler and his opportunity and the team looks forward to getting ready for FAU.”

For what it’s worth (probably not much), Murray was nearly perfect in mop-up duty last year, completing 18-of-21 passes for 359 yards, three touchdowns and zero interceptions. Still, while that’s a tiny sample size, he’s an exciting athlete who can hurt defenses with his legs or arm.

He’ll have some help. Marquise Brown and CeeDee Lamb, who combined for 103 catches, 1,902 receiving yards and 15 touchdowns last year, are both back. The offensive line, despite losing Orlando Brown and Erick Wren, returns three all-conference performers (Ben Powers, Dru Sami, Bobby Evans). And running back Rodney Anderson was a stud last year, running for 1,079 yards, 6.5 yards per attempt and 11 touchdowns in just eight games after becoming the full-time starter in Week 6.

Though it won’t be the same without Mayfield, this offense should continue to be a dangerous unit.

The defense, on the other hand, remains a question mark. It’s very young–there will likely only be one senior starter, free safety Kahlil Haughton–but it’s also chalk full of talented pieces. Last year’s unit finished the year 76th in the country in yards per play allowed, so it’s likely they will improve on that, but just how much they improve could be the key to the season if the offense isn’t quite as dominant.

All-in-all, the Sooners are a bit of an enigma heading into 2018. There are some unknown pieces, most notably at the most important position, but they also have the talent and the schedule (they have a 60 percent win probability or better in every game, according to Bill Connelly’s S&P+ advanced analytics) to get back to the playoff.

No matter what happens, they’ll certainly be fun to watch.

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