LSU vs UCF Live Stream: How to Watch Online Without Cable

Ed Orgeron

Getty LSU coach Ed Orgeron

The No. 8 ranked UCF Knights (12-0; AAC champions) finished another season undefeated, and have the opportunity to prove their merit against an SEC opponent once again when they take on the No. 11 LSU Tigers (9-3; SEC) in the PlayStation Fiesta Bowl on Tuesday afternoon.

The game is scheduled to start at 1 p.m. ET and will be broadcast nationally on ESPN. If you don’t have cable or can’t get to a TV, you can still watch a live stream of the game (or DVR it) on your computer, phone or streaming device by signing up for one of the following cable-free, live-TV streaming services:

Hulu With Live TV

In addition to a Netflix-like on-demand streaming library, Hulu also offers a bundle of 50-plus live TV channels, including all the ESPN channels. You can sign up for “Hulu with Live TV” right here, and you can then watch a live stream of the game on your computer via the Hulu website, or on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the Hulu app.

If you can’t watch live, “Hulu with Live TV” also comes with 50 hours of Cloud DVR storage (with the ability to upgrade to “Enhanced Cloud DVR,” which gives you 200 hours of DVR space and the ability to fast forward through commercials).

Sling TV

ESPN and ESPN 2 are both included in the “Sling Orange” channel package. You can sign up for a free 7-day trial, and you can then watch a live stream of the game on your computer via the Sling TV website, or on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the Sling TV app.

If you can’t watch live, you can get 50 hours of cloud DVR storage as an additional add-on.

ESPN Platforms

Additionally, you can also watch a live stream of the game on your computer via ESPN.com, or on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the ESPN app. You’ll need to log in to a cable provider to watch this way, but if you don’t have that, you can still sign up for one of the above options and then use your Hulu or Sling TV credentials to sign in and watch on the ESPN digital platforms.


Preview

LSU once again boasts one of the nation’s best secondaries. The Tigers allowed only 206.8 passing yards per game this season.

But it is in the secondary, Defensive Back “U,” where LSU will be most tested on Tuesday. Andraez “Greedy” Williams has elected not to play after declaring and preparing for the NFL Draft. Several other players, including Kristian Fulton (ankle) and Kelvin Joseph (suspension for violating team rules).

A usually strong defense will be slightly weaker heading into a matchup against a UCF offense that has faired well recently — for lack of a better term. Tigers head coach Ed Orgeron attempts to win his first bowl game with the program. LSU lost to Notre Dame 21-17 in last season’s Citrus Bowl.

First-year coach Josh Heupel took over a program that finished 13-0 under Scott Frost in 2017. Frost’s team capped off a 12-0 season by defeating the Auburn Tigers 34-27 in the Peach Bowl, before he left and took the head coaching vacancy at this alma mater, the University of Nebraska.

Frost finished 19–7 in his two seasons before Heupel took over. Thanks in large part to a terrific season from junior quarterback McKenzie Milton, the Knights extended the nation’s longest Division I unbeaten streak. Heupel hyped up his team to reporters during the week:

“Anyone that’s been involved in college football … should understand how difficult it is to do what these individuals have done over the last 24 months. It’s extremely special. It’s rare, the ability to stay focused on a weekly basis. To handle adversity. To continue to compete at an elite level, knowing that you’re getting everybody’s best shot. If you’re involved in college athletics you understand how special this group of individuals is.”

In the second quarter of UCF’s game against rival South Florida, Milton sustained a gruesome leg injury that ended his season and threatened what was remaining of his college career:

Freshman Darriel Mack Jr. will get the start as the Knights attempt to dispose of their second straight SEC foe in a nationally televised New Year’s Day bowl game.