Google Glass Fixes Security Breach: What You Need To Know

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Google Glass was positioned as a revolutionary new computer when it premiered at the company’s annual developers conference. The glasses sat upon Larry Page’s face as he discussed the multiple features it would contain. Once the dust settled after the conference concluded, numerous questions were raised about the gadget. The biggest concern was privacy, especially since several porn producers expressed interest in the item.

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While the glasses are still a few months away from an initial release, the company has made efforts to repair a prominent security breach. According to The Guardian, researchers at mobile security firm Lookout discovered a flaw that could have allowed hackers to analyze data being sent from the Google Glasses to the web without the wearer’s knowledge.

What’s the diabolical method they could have used? A corrupted QR code would have given them easy access. Hackers could have incorporated numerous versions of this code into pictures. Once a Google Glass owner takes a picture, the hacker ends up infiltrating the Glasses processor and can do anything from sending costly SMS messages or stealing personal information.

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Fortunately, Lookout discovered this issue first. QR codes are an essential part of the Google Glass system. Since the device doesn’t have a keyboard, Google Glass relies on QR codes for important functions, like connecting to a Wi-Fi connection. While QR codes represent the ingenuity and creativity of Google Glass, QR codes temporarily jeopardized Google Glasses commercial success (why would you want a device that could be hacked so easily!?)

Check out the video below where Lookout explains its methods.

Hacking the Internet of Things for Good: Google GlassRead our blog post for the full story: https://blog.lookout.com/blog/2013/07/17/hacking-the-internet-of-things-for-good. Connected things need to be thought of as software when it comes to security, and Google Glass is the perfect example to that end giving us great confidence about the device moving forward. Lookout followed responsible disclosure practices and notified Google about the vulnerability on May 16, 2013. Google clearly worked quickly to fix the vulnerability as the issue was fixed by version XE6, which was released on June 4th. Lookout recommended that Google limit QR code execution to points where the user has solicited it. Google's changes reflected this recommendation. This responsive turnaround indicates the depth of Google's commitment to privacy and security for this device.2013-07-17T10:58:08.000Z