Top 10 Best Record Players Under $500
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Top 10 Best Record Players Under $500

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(Flickr/Alan Levine)

Though digital listening brings loads of convenience for music lovers, many look at vinyl as the last cool way to enjoy music.

Spinning a record from your favorite band offers an aesthetic experience that can’t be reproduced by digital listening.

But buying a record player carries the same pitfall as buying any other piece of audio equipment: you can spend a nearly unlimited amount of money searching for a better and better sound.

However, a budding fan of analog audio need not more than $500 to get a turntable that will play records with the fidelity and respect that they deserve.

Depending on what kind of setup you’re already working with, you may also need to spring some extra cash on a solid pair of monitors and an amplifier, though many of the better “entry-level” players have an amp built-in.

In any case, most will agree that transitioning to vinyl audio is a worthwhile investment that brings the labor of love to your listening space.


1. Audio-Technica AT-LP1240

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(Amazon)

Audio-Technica is an absolute powerhouse for entry-level audio equipment, and while their LP1240 turntable faces stiff competition from Audio-Technica’s less expensive LP120-USB (reviewed further on), its quality aluminum parts and stronger motor make it a fantastic option for anyone who plans to use their turntable often.

The curved tone arm is solid and has a dedicated grounding lug, though it does not include a cartridge or a stylus. The table has sturdy rubber feet and includes a hinged dust cover.

This record player’s direct drive design and high-torque motor can handle the roughest use, making it a clear pick for professional DJs. The LP1240’s motor can do back-cueing, plus switch between forward and reverse play with ease.

While these features help cement the sheer value of the LP1240, most home listeners won’t benefit from pitch-shifting their audio, nonetheless playing records in reverse, which requires a special needle anyway.

These features are not simply tacked on though. They are all thoughtfully executed, right down to the controls to toggle between 33/45/78 RPM playback speeds. They have a great feel to them, as do the pitch control slider and start/stop button.

In any case, the value of a better motor is not lost on a casual listener, nor is the value of its hefty build quality. Its more precise motor means less wow and flutter in your playback.

The solid build ensures that no vibrations or motor noises interfere with the music. Its signal-to-noise ratio is 55 dB, which will please listeners who prefer analog setups for their high fidelity.

The AT-LP1240 has a built-in switchable phono preamp, which allows for properly amplified playback through most any receivers or powered speakers.

Even with this preamp though, line output doesn’t get at high as other turntables in its class, so you will have to crank your volume knob just a bit more for this table.

This player has a standard dual RCA port, in addition to USB connectivity, which allows you to digitize your rarest cuts without losing their classic vinyl warmth.

It is bundled with a standard version of Audacity, a free software that performs basic recording functions efficiently.

All of this considered, the AT-LP1240 offers quite a lot of value, and is cheaper than other manufacturers’ answer to this Super-OEM masterpiece, such as the Stanton ST-150.

But if pricing is primary a concern, the cheaper LP120 is definitely the more value-conscious purchase. I have always ended up loving my Audio-Technica gear no matter how much I spend on it, so either table is a winning pick.

Price: $449.00

Buy the Audio-Technica AT-LP1240 here.


Pros:

  • USB connectivity for digital archiving
  • High-torque direct drive motor enables controlled playback
  • Quality metal tonearm tracks excellently

Cons:

  • No included cartridge or stylus
  • Quieter line output than other tables
  • Extra controls won’t be useful to home listeners

Find more Audio-Technica AT-LP1240 information and reviews here.



2. U-Turn Orbit Plus Turntable

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(Amazon)

U-Turn Audio is a company with a simple goal: to offer a functional and beautiful turntable for a reasonable price. Their Orbit Plus turntable meets this goal elegantly with a no-frills open belt design that is too simple to fail.

The player is well put-together overall, but the most noteworthy parts of its construction are the beautifully painted MDF (medium density fiberboard) plinth and the large acrylic platter, both of which contribute to a steady and consistent sound.

he table’s motor sits separate from the plinth atop a unique rubber suspension, which does a solid job of preventing vibrations in the sound.

The other parts of this table are more modestly designed, such as the metal and plastic tone arm. It has a good tracking force and a low center of mass, but isn’t particularly impressive.

This turntable also does away with automatic conveniences like a speed control button. For a manual player to change from 33 1/3 RPM to 45 RPM, you must instead move the taut rubber drive belt onto a different pulley.

The Orbit Plus also lacks a feature to stop records that have played all the way through, nor does it have a cuing lever, meaning that this turntable requires more involvement than fancier automated players out there.

Yet, for many turntable lovers, the manual actions are all part of the ritual. It is a special moment that connects you the music in a physical way. But others definitely prefer the automated alternative.

However you coax it out, the analog warmth of vinyl recording is a treasure, and the Orbit Plus makes listening to music wildly fun. Depending on where you purchase your table from, it will either come with an Ortofon OM-5E cartridge or a Grado Black1 cartridge, both of which are great options that will add punchiness and detail to your records.

Be careful using different cartridges on this table though, as it there is no easy way to adjust your vertical tracking angle. One owner did post a video outlining a fairly simple fix here.

The signal-to-noise ratio of the Orbit Plus is measured in A-weighted measurements, which consider human hearing limitations to rate the noise level at a nearly inaudible -79 dBA. Three vibration-damping feet also help achieve this impressive figure, though they aren’t height-adjustable.

For the price, the Orbit Plus delivers an incredible sound, and will please first time vinyl collectors and vets alike. This table’s stylish minimal design looks great with any setup, and the table is available in several colors through Amazon.

There are even more colors and customization options available too (including an optional tonearm lifter) on the U-Turn Webstore, though I do enjoy the sleek black design myself.

U-Turn also touts an incredible customer support team, replacing parts with regular design upgrades, and going the extra mile to ensure you enjoy your player.

Price: $309.00

Buy the U-Turn Orbit Plus Turntable here.


Pros:

  • Stylish and precise acrylic platter
  • Very low S/N ratio
  • Custom design options

Cons:

  • Fully manual design can be cumbersome
  • No way to adjust vertical tracking angle
  • Basic feature set won’t please knob fiddlers

Find more U-Turn Orbit Plus Turntable information and reviews here.



3. Music Hall MMF 2.2

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(Amazon)

Music Hall is a company that has spent many decades honing a quality analog sound. Their MMF series turntables are manufactured in the Czech Republic, in a factory that has been making turntables for over 50 years.

Despite their 2.2 turntable (second generation of the 2 line) being a part of their entry-level line, it sounds fantastic and shares several components with its higher-end counterparts.

The player, like most, requires some assembly and light calibration, most of which is detailed in this video and would take a prepared user no more than 30 minutes.

In terms of aesthetics, the MMF 2.2 is nothing fancy. Yet it is still pleasing to the eye. It comes in a high-gloss piano black lacquer, or a Ferrari Red color for a slightly higher price.

Music Hall sticks to minimalist aesthetics in their turntables, focusing instead on developing top sound quality. As such, this player is fully manual, right down to the stepped motor pulley for adjusting between 33 1/3 RPM and 45 RPM speeds.

The player does offer basic luxuries though, including a dust cover, adjustable vibration-damping feet, and a quality MDF plinth to hold everything together and resist vibrations. These great design choices are hindered by small inconveniences on the connections end though, as the power cable has a bulky wall transformer, and the table’s RCA cables are internally wired.

Aside from small design gripes and a subpar felt platter mat, this turntable packs a lot of quality parts for its price. The alloy platter is serviceable, and the separately isolated asynchronous motor is remarkably quiet.

The MMF 2.2 ships with the same alloy tonearm that comes on the Music Hall MMF 5.1, the next step up from this turntable. This solid tonearm provides excellent tracking, even on warped vinyl, and it sits atop a high precision stainless steel and bronze bearing.

The table has virtually no wow or flutter, and breathes life into hi-fi recordings like some of the best players out there. The included music hall moving magnet phono cartridge comes mounted and properly aligned with an elliptical stylus.

The sound it produces is nice and neutral, allowing your recordings to flourish as they were intended to by sound engineers.

By paying attention to the crucial details, Music Hall squeezes a lot of value into this $300 player. The end result is a worthwhile turntable that offers affordability and sound quality above all else.

Price: $299.00 (34 percent off MSRP)

Buy the Music Hall MMF 2.2 here.


Pros:

  • High quality tonearm and bearing
  • Included cartridge provides solid tracking
  • Adjustable vibration-damping feet and low noise engine enclosure

Cons:

  • Wall transformer and internally wired RCA cables
  • Fully manual design can be cumbersome
  • Low quality slip mat

Find more Music Hall MMF 2.2 information and reviews here.



4. Pro-Ject Debut Carbon DC

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(Amazon)

The Debut Carbon (DC) is Pro-Ject’s answer to a best-buy turntable option, combining powerful design features with an affordable price. This is another manual player that forgoes elements of convenience to put their best dollar down on superior building materials.

As the name alludes, the Debut’s 8.6-inch carbon tube tonearm is its defining piece of equipment, as it greatly dampens unwanted resonance with its rigid design. This tonearm has only recently begun to be used on their lower-priced turntables, and makes an instant difference in the quality of LP playback.

The tonearm is complemented with an included Ortofon 2M Red cartridge, which offers clear and warm sound, and would separately add about $100 to the price tag.

This cartridge is fairly common on turntables of this price tier, as they add clarity and life to recordings at a good price to the user. All with very little break-in time.

Beneath the tonearm and cart sits a large, heavy 300mm platter that offers consistent rotation, with little to no wow or flutter. And beneath the platter, the DC’s motor is suspended with thermal plastics and rubber in order to fully isolate the mechanical sounds from your audio recordings.

One thing that Pro-Ject leaves out of the audio department is a preamp or phono amp, which will be necessary to get the volume you need plugging into a hi-fi system. However, many hi-fi systems have amps built in, so check what you’re working with before you go ahead and order extra equipment.

As for usability features, the Carbon DC offers the necessary functionality without busying up the elegant design of the MDF plinth. The on/off switch is on the side of the player, which allows you to use it even while the dust cover is on. Of course, you would still have to lift it to switch the record or change from 33 1/3 RPM to 45 RPM (which requires lifting the platter).

The measurements for the counterweight and anti-skate mechanism are not fully accurate on their own, so a tracking force scale like the Shure SFG-2 would be a good thing to have.

And one smaller downside for the Carbon is that it packs a fairly bulky wall transistor. This is expected for a quality turntable though, as these ultra precision frequency DC-driven AC generators helps stabilize the power sent to the motor.

Plus, the included felt slip mat is embarrassingly thin, and is practically begging to be upgraded to the Pro-Ject Cork It turntable mat.

Aside from very small nitpicks, the Carbon offers everything one would look for in an entry-level turntable, plus it comes in high-gloss black or shiny red, green, blue, yellow, silver or white finishes. This player also comes in a USB version with an included phono stage, which some may prefer. Either option is a solid choice.

Price: $399.00

Buy the Pro-Ject Debut Carbon here.


Pros:

  • High quality carbon tonearm
  • Includes Ortofon 2M Red cartridge
  • Large, heavy platter offers smooth play speed

Cons:

  • No phono preamp
  • Ortofon 2M cartridge needs break-in time
  • Counterweight does not come calibrated

Find more Pro-Ject Debut Carbon information and reviews here.



5. Rega RP1 Turntable

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(Amazon)

UK-Based company Rega makes many grand promises about its RP1 turntable, and although it lives up to lives up to most of those claims, it only offers marginal value over other tables with its slightly higher price. Behind its spartan manual design, the RP1 delivers a solid analog sound with some creative design choices.

To start, the RP1 is notably lighter than other record players, as reducing the potential for energy transfer is a key design philosophy for Rega. By using lighter materials for the RP1’s MDF plinth, the player transfers less vibration from its high quality motor.

In a lot of ways, this principle opposes other players who rely on weighty parts to reduce vibration, but both ideas work in practice. The motor used in the RP1 is frequently compared to those used in higher-end Rega models, not to mention classic players like the Linn Sondek LP12.

Another big part of this weight difference comes from the table’s phenolic resin (aka bakelite) platter, which is only weighted at the outer edge of the platter in order to achieve a flywheel effect that ensures stable play.

Conversely, some users report disappointment in the platter, which occasionally ships with a slightly warped surface. The general consensus is that a wobbly platter does not significantly affect playback, but it affects user experience all the same.

The latest RP1 models come stock with a Rega Carbon moving magnet cartridge, which is known for having a very low noise floor. The RP1 used to ship with an Ortofon Red cartridge, which has a nice warm sound, but those looking for a more neutral sound will prefer the Rega Carbon. Keep in mind that this player has no way to adjust the vertical tracking angle of the tonearm, so you won’t be able to upgrade to just any cartridge.

The tone arm is simple yet effective, and contributes to great tonal quality and channel separation. Materials seem to be simple plastics, but all the same, the tone arm elevation is well damped and downforce is consistent.

The RP1’s RCA cables are permanently attached to the turntable and do not have a ground clip, which according to reviews, can lead to some ground hum in some setups. This player also lacks a phono stage, and needs an external one.

All in all, the RP1 has its flaws, but still stands as a top quality player. And there is certainly something to be said for their innovative approach, as many entry-level player specs are fairly uniform.

Keep in mind that if you choose the RP1, you can improve its sound with the separately sold Rega RP1 Performance Pack, but if you are looking for a table that won’t need the upgrade, then this one might not be your best pick.

Price: $445.00

Buy the Rega RP1 Turntable here.


Pros:

  • Lightweight and design does not encourage vibration
  • Rega Carbon cartridge has low noise floor
  • High quality, low vibration motor

Cons:

  • No way to adjust vertical tracking angle
  • Some units suffer from wobbly platter
  • Receives ground hum through some hi-fi systems

Find more Rega RP1 Turntable information and reviews here.



7. Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB

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(Amazon)

For those who appreciated the sturdy build and expanded feature set of the above-mentioned AT-LP1240, Audio-Technica’s own AT-LP120-USB is probably its best competitor for the top value in a direct drive turntable.

As a direct drive player, the LP-120 grants you access to a bunch of interesting features. Unfortunately, the average user will find only novelty in features like pitch control and reverse play, but they can be fun nonetheless.

There is certainly nothing wrong with having them, as the only real downside downside of direct drive tables doesn’t apply to this well-built clone of the LP-1200. Other direct drive tables will be more prone to motor vibrations leaking into sound, but the LP120’s motor is not even close to intrusive.

Another benefit is that this table can automatically change player speeds 33 1/3 RPM button and a 45 RPM button, and pushing them both will allow 78 RPM playback. The high-torque motor starts and stops quickly, and has no trouble turning its solid die-cast aluminum platter.

When it comes to sound, the table is on the money. Recorded audio comes through clear, and free from wow and flutter. Tonal detail is solid, and recordings flourish on this player, but it does not come equipped for studio levels of detail. The AT95E Dual Magnet phono cartridge functions decently, but would definitely be the first piece to upgrade on this player, especially since the standard mount makes it easy to replace the cartridge altogether.

Another reason to swap away from the AT95E is its heavy tracking force of 3-5 grams, which can be rough on a record if the player is bumped or jostled. But the player does track effectively right out of the box, especially with its metal S-shaped tonearm. Distortion is minimal, and skipping and popping are rare thanks to its anti-skate control and tone arm height lock.

The attached RCA cables are a bit of a disappointment, since replaceable ones are so convenient. The LP120 still makes up for it and them some by offering USB connectivity and a built-in switchable preamplifier for playing on any sort of speaker systems.

With all of the features that the LP120 offers, it doesn’t end up looking as sleek and elegant as other players in its price range, but it has its own high-tech look. In addition to the numerous extra controls and sliders, the LP120 also has a pop-up stylus target light and stroboscopic platter speed indicator.

The LP120’s outer casing is actually plastic though, which is a big reason why some will prefer to upgrade to the all-metal AT-LP1240. As for which one is best for you, it depends on how you use it.

Price: $299.00

Buy the Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB here.


Pros:

  • USB connectivity for digital archiving
  • Direct-drive, high-torque motor
  • 3 playback speeds, reverse playback, plus pitch control

Cons:

  • Internally wired RCA cables
  • Included cartridge could be better
  • Price has recently risen

Find more Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB information and reviews here.



8. Onkyo CP-1050 Direct-Drive Turntable

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(Amazon)

Ever since Onkyo’s debut in 1946, they have been delivering performance audio engineering in the form of their evolving lineup of turntables. The CP-1050 is the latest of Onkyo’s entry-level models, which is a super-smooth low-torque direct drive player.

The unit sports a classic design, and definitely looks better without the included dust cover. But don’t forget, dust covers are an important tool on any turntable, as they reduce vibrations that come from your speakers.

This player further reduces vibrations with its thick MDF plinth. The player’s aluminum platter also contributes to a steady sound. Some of the machined aluminum platters have been reported as wobbling by about 1mm during playback, but this has no discernible effect on playback.

Something that immediately sets the CP-1050 apart from the aforementioned Audio Technica turntables, is that its direct-drive motor is low-torque, focusing on eliminating motor noise rather than improving tracking. The CP-1050 also forgoes bells and whistles like pitch control and reverse playing. Instead, it puts its power towards delivers reliable quartz-locked speeds when playing in 33/45 RPM. There is no 78 RPM setting on this table.

Its aluminum S-shaped tone arm works well with the direct drive motor, but the included cartridge is a low-end Audio Technica 3600, which can easily be replaced. It is serviceable, but is easily outclassed by the Ortofon Red or Blue. Out of the box, the signal-to-noise ratio is greater than 60 dB, and the stock cartridge is definitely serviceable until you get the itch to upgrade.

Its RCA parts are traditional phono output, so again, you may need a preamp for this one. But for those with a taste for the vintage style will love the reliable playback and time-honored direct-drive design of the CP-1050.

Price: $390.99 (22 percent off MSRP)

Buy the Onkyo CP-1050 Direct-Drive Turntable here.


Pros:

  • Consistent quartz-locked speeds
  • Sturdy retro style
  • Starts and stops quickly

Cons:

  • Low-quality included cartridge
  • No phono preamp
  • Some units suffer from wobbly platter

Find more Onkyo CP-1050 Direct-Drive Turntable information and reviews here.



9. Denon DP-300F Fully Automatic Analog Turntable

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(Amazon)

Denon’s DP-300F is unique among the top budget record players, in that it offers both quality sound and fully automatic controls. That means that all you have to do is press play, and the player automatically lifts the tonearm, and gently lowers it over the active platter as not to damage the stylus or record. When the record side is finished, the platter stops spinning and the tonearm resets so you can do it all again.

One of the biggest benefits of automatic players is that you can fall asleep to your favorite record without waking up to the sound of your needle scraping over the label. The classy design, complete with dust cover, makes this player a great bedroom player, especially since the built-in preamp makes it easy to hook this player up to any speaker setup you have.

The build quality is solid all throughout the DP-300F. The heavy plastic plinth does not set any records for durability or vibration reduction, but it does get the job done alongside its die-cast aluminum platter. The mechanical parts, including the belt-driven motor, are all remarkably silent, and do not affect the sound in any discernible way.

The design of this table is full of other small surprises like a nice rubber slip mat, and RCA connectors. Or another automatic convenience, a button to switch between 33 1/3 and 445 RPM playback speeds.

Many listeners will be surprised to find that that the DP-300F packs a pretty solid sound in addition to its solid suite of automatic features. The audio comes through with no crackling or popping, and draws comparison to the sound-focused competitor models from Rega, Project, and Music Hall.

There is no ground wire, which only a small but vocal minority of hi-fi overlords believe cause ground hum, but may end up influencing your listening experience nonetheless.

The straight tonearm has a removable angled headshell, which improves tracking on side grooves. Depending on where you purchase your player, the DP-300F can ship with a number of different cartridges.

The best option available out of the box is the Ortofon 2M Red cartridge, which sports a charming warmth that is slightly rolled off. Whatever cartridge you end up with, though, it can be easily replaced thanks to a standard cartridge connection.

For those looking for a player that is both great sounding and convenient, the DP-300F is almost too good to be true. This USA-made player has an impressive fit and finish, and delivers a great sound for the price. This is definitely a top pick for anyone looking for an affordable automatic player.

Price: $329.00 (6 percent off MSRP)

Buy the Denon DP-300F Fully Automatic Analog Turntable here.


Pros:

  • Automatic start and stop of playback
  • Accurate tracking from angled headshell
  • Low price for an automatic player

Cons:

  • Plastic plinth could be nicer
  • Ships from some vendors with lower-quality cartridge
  • Receives ground hum through some hi-fi systems

Find more Denon DP-300F Fully Automatic Analog Turntable information and reviews here.



10. TEAC TN-300 Analog Turntable

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(Amazon)

The Teac TN-300 is a downright gorgeous turntable that touts both superb build quality and an enjoyable sound that can be enjoyed no matter what kind of setup you’re working with. The ’70s-inspired design comes with in different colored finishes over the TN-300’s MDF plinth.

Even with its die-cast aluminum platter, the TN-300 isn’t overly heavy, and has vibration-damping adjustable feet to keep unwanted vibrations down. A removable dust cover helps as well, but the player admittedly looks so cool without it, I went full topless the whole time I tested this player.

The TN-300’s combination of USB connectivity, RCA connectors and a selectable phono preamp allows for versatile use. You can hook this player into anything from traditional hi-fi phono setups via RCA connectors, to a pair of computer speakers, or to even your computer itself for direct recording. Keep in mind that because this turntable has no grounding clip, there may be a faint hum on older, more finicky sound systems. This is a rare occurrence though, as the TN-300 sounds bright and clear on most other setups.

The TN-300 comes with an Audio Technica AT95SE cartridge, which is a fairly standard cartridge for players of this price range. The AT95SE is technically outperformed by other cartridges, but it still has a nice warm sound with good bass and tight highs.

Swapping cartridges out can be difficult, as the TN-300 does not have a way to adjust your vertical tracking angle. Additionally, angled headshell is the wrong size for popular upgrade cartridges like the Ortofon Red and Blue.

However, one reviewer noticed that the Denon DP-300F headshell fits perfectly on the TN-300’s tonearm, allowing you more options for cartridge upgrades.

The static balance straight is functional, but nothing to brag about. The motor is consistent with no wow or flutter, and is very silent in playback. This player isolates any mechanical noise from playback using rubber padding, and the end result is an impressive signal-to-noise ratio of 67 dB.

Beyond the listening experience alone, the TN-300 also sports high usability, with attention to detail offering small surprises behind each manual function.

Unlike clunkier manual players, the TN-300 offers conveniences like a switch for alternating between 33 1/3 and 45 RPM playback, plus a high quality cue lever. This table comes with a rubber slip mat far exceeding the quality of the thin felt mats that come with most other players.

For many, the TEAC TN-300 is the perfect combination of build quality, sound, and affordability. This table sounds great out of the box, and only sounds better as components wear-in. If you want a well-round turntable that doesn’t sacrifice style for functionality, the TN-300 is a top pick.

Price: $399.99

Buy the TEAC TN-300 Analog Turntable here.


Pros:

  • USB output plus built-in phono amp
  • Stylish and durable build
  • High signal-to-noise ratio

Cons:

  • No way to adjust vertical tracking angle
  • Included cartridge could be better
  • Receives ground hum through some hi-fi systems

Find more TEAC TN-300 Analog Turntable information and reviews here.


Heavy, Inc. is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to Amazon. Our product recommendations are guided solely by our editors. We have no relationship with manufacturers.
5 Comments

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5 Comments

Mathew Fackler

I was curious if you ever thought of changing the layout of your site? Its very well written; I love what youve got to say. But maybe you could a little more in the way of content so people could connect with it better. Youve got an awful lot of text for only having 1 or 2 images. Maybe you could space it out better?

Jason

I have the Audio Technica AT-LP120 but looking to add to my collection. @Gaston have you got some tips for buying a good turntable?

Paul

Gaston, you are right, they have no clue what is a good turntable. The whole article is leading the readers to the forest, showing up LP playing as an easy ride and an immediate qway to quality music. This simply isn’t true. Analog is WAY more sensitive to setup, partnering equipment ( cartridge, phono amp) and TT itself. One needs deep knowledge to make good sound from LP. Then, beyond a relative high level it beats digital. Any digital.

Jason, for entry to quality LP playing you should consider a Funk Firm LSD turntable, a complete package that designed to each other and has musical and build quality. I would replace the stock AT95 pickup by a more sophisticated one, probably a Denon DL-110 or a Hana high out model. (HS)

Darren

The article is for those seeking economy cars that serve well , you are telling them to buy a Lambo whats the sense in your comment ? why don’t you pitch in at the price point being discussed I can scarcely afford the decks in the article, Funk Firm LSD turntable ? 1500 pounds and the article is discussing $300 tables ,

link

well not exactly the AT 1240 is over 450.00 maybe on sale about 400.00

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