17 Best Cheap Mechanical Keyboards: Your Buyer’s Guide

cheap mechanical keyboard

Mechanical keyboards are the next step up from plain, everyday membrane keyboards. They are a popular ergonomic upgrade for all types of users, particularly gamers and typists.

Individual mechanical switches beneath each key offer a number of benefits. The biggest one is an improved tactile response that speeds up typing. When you hear the click of a mechanical switch, you instantly know that your keystroke has registered.

The most feather-fingered typists use this satisfying click as a signal that they’ve depressed the key far enough, and can now begin the next keystroke. After a bit of practice, you will be able to type paragraphs without bottoming out your keys. You’ll notice an immediate improvement in typing speed to match.

Mechanical keyboards do have some downsides, though. They are loud and heavy, so they don’t work well in shared workspaces. They are also often quite expensive. But even if your budget for peripherals is tight, you can still find a high-quality mechanical keyboard. We’ve picked out our ten favorites that you can get for under $100.

Don’t get stuck using a slow and mushy membrane keyboard all your life. Check out the best cheap mechanical keyboards below.

What Are the Best Cheap Mechanical Keyboards in 2019?

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  • Tactile feedback
  • Durable and water-resistant design
  • Cheap
Price: $32.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
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  • Cherry MX switches
  • Fully programmable keys
  • Multimedia hotkeys
Price: $49.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
blackwidow lite cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Fully custom RGB LED array
  • Tactile blue switches
  • Full 104-key array
Price: $64.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
victsing cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Durable and water-resistant
  • Solid tactile feedback
  • Low price
Price: $25.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
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  • Adjustable LEDs
  • Tactile feedback
  • Compact and durable
Price: $75.89 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
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  • Cherry MX switches
  • Dedicated media hotkeys
  • Quieter keystrokes
Price: $69.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
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  • 104-key array
  • Adjustable LEDs
  • Beautiful
Price: $41.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
blackwidow lite cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Brightness-adjustable white LEDs
  • Small footprint
  • Multimedia hotkeys
Price: $71.49 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
ducky cheap mech keyboard
  • Brightness-adjustable blue LEDs
  • High-quality PBT caps
  • Compact and durable
Price: $99.00 Shop at amzn.to Shop now Read our review
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  • Tactile feedback
  • Detachable wrist rest
  • Adjustable LEDs
Price: $249.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
aula unicorn keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Compact and durable
  • Tactile feedback
  • Cheap
Price: $59.95 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
hyperx cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Cherry MX Red switches
  • Brightness-adjustable red LEDs
  • Detachable USB cable
Price: $69.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
havit cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Tactile feedback
  • Shallow keycaps
  • Adjustable LEDs
Price: $59.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
velocifire cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Full 104-key array
  • ABS double-shot key caps
  • Blue backlit keys
Price: $43.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
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  • Cherry MX switches
  • Full 104-key array
  • Windows key lock
Price: $94.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
rosewill cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Solid tactile feedback
  • Windows key lock
  • Detachable braided USB cable
Price: $84.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
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  • Compact and durable
  • Tactile feedback
  • Cheap
Price: $28.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Our Unbiased Reviews
  1. 1. Redragon K552 LED Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Solid tactile feedback from blue switches
    • Durable and water-resistant design
    • Low price
    Cons:
    • Blue switches can be quite loud
    • No number pad
    • Ugliest key cap font

    The Redragon K552 is a compact mechanical keyboard that has earned its place among the budget keyboard greats by matter of sheer price value. Simply put, this is one of the best deals on a mechanical keyboard you’ll find.

    Like many budget keyboards, the catch to the K552’s bargain price is that it does not use name brand Cherry switches. Cherry switches are the gold standard by which other switches are judged, so some deem them necessary.

    But that’s not entirely true at the budget price point. In fact, this keyboard packs a close imitation of the classic Cherry MX Blue switches, which are among the clickiest and most responsive style.

    Redragon claims that their custom switches are Cherry Green equivalents, but many advanced users notice that the keys have the lighter action pressure of Cherry Blue switches.

    This means they are likely Blues from Chinese brand Otemu.

    They work equally well for gaming and typing, but again, they are quite loud, so best not to be used in a shared environment.

    This is an 87-key keyboard, which means it does not have a number pad. This can be nice for saving space, but make sure you’ll want a number pad if you regularly crunch numbers.

    The keys have a red LED design with some basic glowing effects to cycle through. These keys sit atop a base plate of both aluminum and ABS. It provides good weight and has spill-resistant properties.

    The top row of function keys has built-in multimedia functions like play/pause, tracking, and volume controls. This can be handy for watching movies or listening to music.

    This keyboard is not the type to sport any crazy bells and whistles, but rather, a down to business board that focuses on high-end performance at a low price.

    As such, its value is balanced by a few small nitpicks. One such is that the USB cable feels flimsier than other models, which have nice braided cables.

    And this complaint is really just looking for something to not like, but the K552 has to have to ugliest font of the lot in my opinion.

    You may enjoy its awkward mix of sci-fi sleekness and dungeon manual chunkiness, but it’s simply not for me.

    These gripes aside, this keyboard offers incredible performance at an equally incredible value.

  2. 2. Corsair K66 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Cherry red switches are great for gaming
    • Fully programmable keys
    • Multimedia hotkeys
    Cons:
    • Not as clicky as blue switches
    • Large desk footprint
    • No wrist rest

    The Corsair K66 is a no-nonsense cheap mechanical keyboard that puts performance before presentation. This keyboard forgoes fancy RGB LEDs and accessories to bring high-performance switches to an inexpensive package.

    The K66 delivers smooth linear key travel thanks to its Cherry MX Red switches, which are the standard switches you’d expect to find on high-end mech keyboards.

    These keys are notably quieter than budget switches, while still offering fast travel and tactile feedback.

    They support full key rollover, which means if you pressed every key down at once, it would register every single one. It is also fully anti-ghosting, further improving accuracy.

    This 104-key model has a full number pad, plus dedicated media hotkeys. My personal favorite inclusion is the windows key lock, which prevents you from accidentally switching to your desktop in the middle of a full-screen game.

    Corsair’s free CUE software allows you to fully reprogram this keyboard. The most useful application is setting up macro commands to streamline your work or gaming.

    Ultimately, this keyboard is best suited to gaming, but those who want a silent and tactile typing experience will have a fantastic time using this keyboard as well.

  3. 3. Aukey 104-Key Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Fully custom RGB LED array
    • Tactile blue switches are weighted for gaming
    • Full 104-key array
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • Blue switches can be quite loud
    • Hardwired USB cable
    This full-size mechanical keyboard from Aukey is a fantastic entry point into the world of mechanical keyboards, as the only true RGB keyboard we’ve found in its price range.
     
    While other LED-illuminated boards might only have one color (or a static rainbow array), this board has individual LEDs behind each switch. This allows you to cycle through 14 preset lighting effects or painstakingly customize your own design without software needed. You can also adjust the brightness for the whole board.
     
    Behind each raised keycap is an Otemu blue switch. Blues are the loudest switch available but they are also more or less specially weighted for gaming. Their springy, tactile feel makes them great for developing your twitch reflexes for the big leagues.
     
    Because the key caps are raised, the LEDs beneath reflect quite a bit off the brushed aluminum frame, adding to the vibrant look of this keyboard.
     
    The metal board is heavy and durable, which is nice to see on a budget board even though it makes it harder to transport. The only build-quality shortcoming is the hardwired USB cable.
     
    Considering that the price on this keyboard is awesome and there is so little to dislike about its overall design, this is definitely one of the best cheap mechanical keyboards for PC Master Race newcomers.
  4. 4. VicTsing Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Durable and water-resistant design
    • Solid tactile feedback from blue switches
    • Low price
    Cons:
    • Hardwired non-braided USB cable
    • Not backlit
    • No number pad

    It doesn’t get much cheaper than the VicTsing Mechanical Gaming Keyboard, which is a godsend for PC gamers who want high performance without all the bells and whistles.

    It doesn’t get more plain than this 87-key keyboard, which is all black and white with no LEDs to backlight the keys or spice up its appearance. This could be detrimental if you have to look down at your keyboard often and you work in the dark, but otherwise its serviceable.

    I wasn’t able to figure out exactly which brand of switches this board uses, but it is plain to tell that they are some form of Blues based on their color and their loud clicky sound.

    This keyboard goes all in the loud and clicky but this isn’t a bad thing, as many people (who live alone) prefer the Blues for this exact reason. They keys are anti-ghosting and N-key rollover. They even have multimedia shortcuts on the function row.

    The board itself is a mix of metal and plastic. It has clever draining holes that make it water-resistant on top of its already durable design. Unfortunately, the hardwired non-braided USB cable leaves something to be desired.

    Still, if you like Blue switches and don’t mind a non-backlit keyboard, there is much value to be gained from this pick.

  5. 5. Roccat Suora Frameless Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Brightness-adjustable blue LEDs
    • Solid tactile feedback from Brown switches
    • Compact and durable
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • No dedicated macro keys
    • Heavy

    If you have limited desk space but still want a number pad and gaming-level performance, then the Roccat Suora is your go-to in the sub $100 price range.

    The Suora’s hefty aluminum alloy base barely extends beyond the 104 keys, making for a nearly frameless look with a minimal desk footprint.

    Keep in mind that this minimalist approach means you won’t have extra luxuries like a wrist rest or an array of media keys. The only extra keys it offers are volume control keys, plus a Game Mode key which disables the windows key.

    When in Game Mode, the keyboard also turns your navigation keys into six macro keys. This is a creative way to add more utility to this modest keyboard, but it will be frustrating if you already bind actions to your Insert or Delete keys.

    This keyboard uses Tactile TTC Brown switches, which compare closest to Cherry MX Browns. They have the same low downward travel, but they feel a bit lighter.

    They have a tactile bump that is great for fast-paced gaming and they give off a slightly muffled click that is considerably quieter than Reds and Blues.

    This keyboard has n-key rollover, which means that you can press pretty much every button simultaneously without any ghosting. It also has a 1 ms polling rate, instantly registering any keystrokes.

    Though this keyboard forgoes the hotly desired RGB LED array, it has elegant blue LEDs in their place. These help for late night typing, and offer 11 different brightness levels to suit your needs. They also have a breathing mode.

    Its includes Roccat Swarm software doesn’t bring too much to the table, but all else considered, this compact and inexpensive keyboard is absolutely packed with awesome features.

    It is a great pick and has a top-notch build quality right down to its braided fabric cable.

  6. 6. Logitech G610 Orion Backlit Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Linear Red Cherry MX switches are great for gaming
    • Dedicated media hotkeys
    • Quieter keystrokes
    Cons:
    • Space bar is spongier than other keys
    • Only the Fn keys are programmable
    • High price tag

    Logitech’s G610 Orion is quite a bit pricier than most budget mechanical keyboards, but any keyboard that sports Cherry MX Red switches for under $100 is a bargain.

    This is a 104-key keyboard, which means it includes a number pad. Not included in the key count are the board’s dedicated media hotkeys, which take full advantage of this keyboard’s large footprint.

    The keyboard’s function row is programmable for macros, but the rest of the keyboard is not.

    Beneath the G610’s keycaps are Cherry MX Red switches, which are celebrated as the perfect compromise between performance and stealthiness.

    They are linear keys, which means they don’t click until they are fully bottomed out. They will be comparatively silent if you are light on your fingers.

    This cheap mechanical keyboard can be purchased with Cherry MX Brown switches for about the same price. The Brown switches are equally light, but much clickier, as they click at the half-press as well.

    There are a few keys where the tactile experience falls short, namely larger ones like the space bar and the return key have a spongier feel as if their springs eat up the tactile click.

    If you want to pick up the G610 for under $100, you must forgo the true RGB design for a white LED design. This is the same case as the Corsair K66.

    The individual key illumination is still customizable on the white LEDs, and personally, I find it looks a little classier.

    This keyboard compares closely to the Corsair K66, but with a higher price tag. Its build quality alone still promises fantastic band for your buck, though, so either one is still a great pick.

  7. 7. EagleTec KG011

    Pros:
    • Full 104-key array with tactile blue switches
    • Brightness-adjustable blue LEDs
    • Beautiful brushed aluminum finish
    Cons:
    • White key caps will accumulate dirt over time
    • Board is lighter and flexier than others
    • No wrist rest

    The KG011 from EagleTec is a keyboard with a full numeric keypad that combines a unique color scheme and aesthetic with high-performance switches. This keyboard stands out from others right away with its brushed aluminum back plate.

    It looks nice and should last a very long time, but it is slightly lighter and easier to flex than other keyboards. The white keycaps with transparent symbols are another awesome detail from EagleTec, and they look fantastic with the brightness-adjustable blue LEDs.

    Do note that these white keycaps will accumulate dirt over time, so you’ll want to remove the keycaps and wash them every now and then. Or just go with the black version.

    The blue switches from Otemu are a fine Cherry clone, proving that relying on brand names can be a pitfall. They are just as tactile and responsive as the next pair of blues out there.

    Despite its fairly basic design, the EagleTec KG011 keyboard delivers everything you need and looks great with any white-colored setup.

  8. 8. BlackWidow Lite Mechanical Tenkeyless Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Brightness-adjustable white LEDs
    • Small footprint
    • Multimedia hotkeys
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • So-so build quality
    • Hardwired USB cable

    The Razer Blackwidow Lite provides the same accurate performance as its full-size counterpart, albeit in a more compact and budget package.

    This tenkeyless keyboard is a great option if you have limited desk space or just prefer a keyboard with a small desk footprint. Even though it is compact, its keys are still normally spaced and have a normal amount of vertical travel.

    This keyboard uses proprietary Razer Orange switches, which are great for gaming or general data entry as well. They have a shallow activation point and have a slightly muffled (though still full audible) click.

    If you want them to be even quieter, you can use the included orange O-rings to further dampen the sounds of the switches. It also comes with a key puller and a hardwired, braided USB cable.

    The BlackWidow Lite has white LEDs under each key which makes them easier to see in a dark room. They can be adjusted for brightness but there aren’t many other color features you can do.

    The Razer Synapse 3 software can be used to set up macros and shortcuts if you so desire. There are a basic suite of multimedia controls bound to the function keys.

    While the key caps on the BlackWidow Lite feel solid, the board itself is somewhat flimsy. It has a metal top but is all plastic beneath, making it feel a little more lightweight than other options.

    Still, this can be seen as a plus for those who want a portable keyboard that can be easily moved around between a few different PCs.

  9. 9. Ducky One PBT LED Keyboard

    Price: $99.00
    Pros:
    • Brightness-adjustable blue LEDs
    • High-quality PBT caps
    • Compact and durable
    Cons:
    • High price tag
    • No multimedia keys
    • Feet slide around somewhat
    Ducky is one of the most popular new mechanical keyboard brands around and their Ducky One PBT stands out with its high-quality keycaps for under $100.
     
    Despite still being a budget 87-key keyboard, the Ducky One is still somewhat pricey for the fact that it has high-quality PBT key caps, which will never wear away. They far exceed the quality of the ABS caps you find on other boards, and represent the main reason to spend a little extra.
     
    The keys are LED backlit in blue to match the Cherry MX Blue keys beneath them. You can get somewhat fancy with the LEDs by adding animations and toying with the brightness, but that’s as far as the customization goes.
     
    There are no multimedia functions or extra features, which is a little disappointing, but you can always download a third-party macro program if that’s a must-have feature.
     
    The board itself is flexible yet sturdy and the detachable USB cable is housed in a way that keeps it from coming loose. If having high-quality key caps is an essential feature of a budget mech keyboard, then the Ducky One makes the cut.
  10. 10. Azio MGK1 Backlit Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Tactile blue switches are weighted for gaming
    • Detachable wrist rest
    • White LED backlight with adjustable brightness
    Cons:
    • Wider keys might be clunky or squeaky
    • Number/symbol keys are printed backwards
    • Higher price tag

    The Azio MGK1 is a cheap mechanical keyboard that shows attention to detail with a huge selection of convenient and ergonomic features. This full-size keyboard sports shortcut keys and a number pad, all of which are illuminated by a simple white LED backlight.

    This is a nice departure from busy gamer designs and has adjustable brightness to keep you in control. There is also a Windows key lock for gaming, so you’ll never minimize your game mid-round again.

    Beneath the sturdy keycaps, the MGK1 sports Kailh Blue switches, a fairly clicky tactile switch set that compares closest to the Cherry MX Blues. Kailh switches have a slightly heavier actuation weight, but they have about the same tactile bumps and actuation points as their name-brand counterpart.

    Only the most sensitive and feather-fingered typists will be able to tell the difference. If you normally bottom out your keys when you type, then the Kailh Blue switches will not affect your performance at all.

    The keyboard frame is high-quality all around, offering cool extras like a detachable wrist rest and volume controller. A black anodized aluminum faceplate holding everything together.

    Aside from small nitpick, the only real issue is that you will sometimes experience stickiness or a metallic rattling from the wider keys (space, shift, enter, backspace) because of an issue with the stabilizer wire that keeps the keys from tilting.

    At the end of the day, the Azio MGK1 is an elegant and clever mech keyboard that stands as a viable alternative to top brands that are double the price.

  11. 11. Aula Unicorn LED Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Compact and durable
    • Solid tactile feedback from blue switches
    • Low price tag
    Cons:
    • Blue switches can be quite loud
    • No color-changing LEDs means no color mapping
    • Limited multimedia controls

    To throw yet another rainbow LED keyboard into the mix, the Aula Unicorn Mechanical Keyboard offers a compact 104-key mech board for a great price.

    Unfortunately, the rainbow boards don’t have the same customization as RGB boards, but with eight preset lighting effects and several brightness settings, this will provide all of the kaleidoscopic entertainment of a board three times its price.

    Also, you are getting a great typing experience with the generic blue switches, which provide a loud, clicky, and feedback-driven experience. Typists will almost always prefer this, as it allows for an audible cue if a key is missed.

    There are several versions of this keyboard, and some of the pricier ones have a number pad. While this one does not, it does have many media hotkey functions. It also has the ever-handy windows lock key, which helps prevent interruptions while gaming.

    Aula definitely keeps thing simple with this design, but if a colorful and functional keyboard that frees extra space on your desk by skipping on the ten key numpad, then consider this pick.

  12. 12. HyperX Alloy FPS Pro 87-Key Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Cherry Red switches are great for gaming
    • Brightness-adjustable red LEDs
    • Detachable USB cable
    Cons:
    • Thin key caps
    • Wider keys might be clunky or squeaky
    • No wrist rest

    The HyperX Alloy FPS Pro is a simple yet effective budget mechanical keyboard that lends itself equally well to gaming or data entry with its Cherry MX Red switches.

    This board actually ships with your choice of Red, Blue, or Brown switches (depending on availability) and comes in an 87-key or 104-key version. We highlighted the 87-key version because it matches the simple design of this board.

    The HyperX Allow FPS doesn’t have any RGB lighting, though it does have a red LED backlight that can be adjusted for brightness or programmed to follow basic patterns. Generally, these pulsing and flashing patterns don’t look as cool with just one color so this feels more like a gimmick on this board.

    What doesn’t feel like a gimmick are its switches, which basically represent the industry standard for mechanical keyboards. Once you feel how well this budget keyboard types, it will leave you wondering why anyone would pay over $100 for a mechanical keyboard to begin with.

    Its steel frame is heavy yet durable and it connects to your PC via a detachable braided USB cable. It has secondary media control keys for basic playback functions.

    This device is not without its flaws, though. Its key caps feel thin compared to other so-called “double-shot” key caps. Additionally, wide keys that need stabilizers will sometimes rattle or squeak.

    These flaws are easy to look past, though, as when you consider the excellent price on the HyperX Allow FPS, it still feels like a win.

  13. 13. Havit Backlit Wired Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Loud, clicky tactile feedback from blue switches
    • Shallow keycaps
    • Adjustable LEDs
    Cons:
    • Requires a third party software to reprogram hot keys
    • No wrist rest
    • Bottom key cap row is not rounded

    The Havit mechanical gaming keyboard is a lightweight and compact mechanical keyboard that offers all of the typing performance without the complete and total dominance of your desk space.

    This 87-key keyboard stands out with its sleek low-profile design and cool blue LEDs with adjustable intensity. The keycaps will either make or break this keyboard for you, as the shallower keys certainly take some getting used to.

    Hardcore typists will not appreciate bottoming out on each keystroke, while the short travel time will make them preferable for gaming. So ultimately, whether or not these keys work for you is entirely up to your need.

    Beneath these keys, the HV-KB378L uses low-profile Kailh blue switches, which are not far off from the Cherry switches they were based on. Blue switches are particularly loud and clicky, which many gamers prefer for the tactile feedback.

    The keyboard has a basic suite of media keys, plus some key combos to control the brightness level of the ice blue LEDs. There are five levels of brightness and different fade modes to choose between. These teal-ish LEDs can also be turned off if they get too distracting.

    Also on the topic of keys, this board requires you to download your choice of third-party keyboard programmer software if you want to change the built-in hotkeys, and you probably will.

    If you are looking for a compact and low-profile mechanical keyboard while sticking to a budget, then the Havit compact is a great pick.

  14. 14. Velocifire VM01 104-Key Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Full 104-key array
    • ABS double-shot key caps
    • Blue backlit keys
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • LED brightness cannot be adjusted
    • No feet to raise the keyboard

    The Velocifire VM01 may not have the colorful flair of a high-end mechanical keyboard but it sports high-end switches and key caps at a value price.

    This keyboard has ABS double-shot key caps, which are thicker and more durable than normal ABS key caps (though still not as nice as PBT key caps). It adds a nice premium feel when you are typing on it.

    The switches underneath the VM01 are Otemu Browns, which are significantly quieter than blue switches (while still being considerably louder than a regular membrane keyboard).

    Otemu Browns have a tactile bump for responsive feedback so gamers looking to engage that twitch reflex can lightly glide across their keyboards.

    The keys are backlit in a teal-ish blue but you cannot adjust their brightness or animate them, which feels a little low-tech.

    Also absent from the VM01 package are adjustable feet to raise the keyboard or a wrist rest. These features aren’t for everyone but I consider them essential ergonomic elements if you spend as much time at your keyboard as I do.

    Still, this is a decently built keyboard and is still a great pick for the price.

  15. 15. Gigabyte GK-Force K83 RED

    Pros:
    • Cherry MX switches provide tactile feedback
    • Full 104-key array
    • Windows key lock helps prevent gaming interruptions
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • Heavy
    • Not backlit

    If you are after the tactile feedback of some top-tier Cherry Red MX switches, then Gigabyte’s GK-Force K83 RED keyboard is one of the best cheap mechanical keyboards you’ll find. Simply put, you won’t find a keyboard that packs mechanical switches of the same tier for cheaper.

    Now, are the name brand switches really that much better than generic switches? Not as much as you’d think, but they are still a point of pride for gamers who like to do things by the books. Plus, their half-click activation point and tactile feedback make them great for gaming regardless of their pedigree.

    The GK-Force K83 is a full-size 104-key keyboard with a number pad and its function row has secondary media functions. This keyboard has N-key rollover and a Windows lock key, which is helpful to prevent accidental interruptions while fullscreen gaming.

    Since most of this keyboard’s budget goes towards high-end switches, it is sparse on extra features. There is no LED backlighting or wrist rests on this keyboard, which can be a downside to some. As a plus, this keyboard is easy to clean because of its island-style keys.

    If you don’t mind its no-frills layout, the Gigabyte GK-Force K83 mech keyboard is a cost-efficient option for high-performance gaming or data entry.

  16. 16. Rosewill RK-9000V2 BR Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Solid tactile feedback from Brown switches
    • Windows key lock helps prevent gaming interruptions
    • Detachable braided USB cable
    Cons:
    • Not backlit
    • Thin key caps
    • No wrist rest

    The Rosewill RK-9000V2 is a beloved budget mech keyboard model that delivers performance over aesthetics.

    This version of the RK-9000V2 does not have LED backlighting, however, there are many variations that do have it. It also ships with Cherry MX Brown switches unless you opt for Reds or Blues instead.

    This version with 104 keys, Brown switches, and no backlighting makes for the ideal down-to-business layout for the user who doesn’t need fancy features to be a proper keyboard warrior.

    The RK-9000V2’s are fully spaced and recess into the raised metal board when you fully bottom out the keys. The brown switches have a shallow activation point, so you don’t have to focus so much on being feather-fingered when you type. They are also comparatively quieter than other options.

    The key caps themselves are decent but thin enough that their lettering could eventually wear off. Again, there is no LED backlighting to illuminate them at night either. The function row has a set of secondary media functions and there is also a Windows lock key to disable that God-forsaken button from ruining another competitive match.

    This keyboard attaches to your PC with a detachable braided USB cable, which is great considering the sad number of keyboards that are thrown out because of broken cables.

    If you want a professional-looking mechanical keyboard that is equally gamer and office-friendly, then Rosewill is a solid pick.

  17. 17. Hcman Blue Switch LED Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Compact and durable
    • Solid tactile feedback from blue switches
    • Low price tag
    Cons:
    • Blue switches can be quite loud
    • No color-changing LEDs means no color mapping
    • Limited multimedia controls

    The Hcman Blue Switch LED Mechanical Keyboard is an absolute gem for gamers on a budget. It is about as cheap as a fully functional mechanical keyboard gets. This compact 87-key keyboard delivers incredible performance for gaming or typing at an almost unheard of price.

    The reason this keyboard is so inexpensive is because it uses generic blue switches instead of name brand Cherry MX Blues. They are CK Blues, which come from a Chinese brand that is functionally identical.

    Despite being clones, these CK blue switches feel fantastic to type on. Their anti-ghosting and key travel compare closely to Cherry MX Blue switches, the standard switches you find on high-end mech keyboards.

    One difference with blue switches is that they are some of the loudest and clickiest you’ll find. This is good if you like auditory feedback, but bad if you share a workspace.

    This compact keyboard forgoes a number pad so that it takes up very little desktop space. Just make sure you have a calculator handy for crunching numbers.

    This Hcman keyboard has multimedia functions to open certain apps and adjust volume. Standard play/pause and tracking controls are absent though.

    The keys are backlit with a rainbow configuration of LEDs, which can be toggled on or off for night use.

    Do not get this rainbow LED configuration confused with proper RGB lights, as the individual keys do not change color. You can simply cycle through different configurations of static LEDs.

    All in all, the high build quality and responsive switches of this keyboard leave you little to complain about for the price.

See Also

11 Best Cherry MX Blue Keyboards: The Ultimate List

15 Best Computer Speakers: Your Buyer’s Guide

5 Best LAN Party Bags: Your Ultimate List

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