15 Best Cheap Mechanical Keyboards: Your Buyer’s Guide

best cheap mechanical keyboard

Though they have been around since the ’70s, mechanical keyboards remain a popular ergonomic upgrade from the mass-produced membrane keyboards that ship with most desktops. Mech keyboards offer a premium typing experience because of their clicky and tactile switches under each key, which makes them particularly appealing to gamers and typists. Here are our favorite ways to ditch the mushy membrane keyboard while keeping to a budget.

What Are the Best Cheap Mechanical Keyboards in 2020?

havit cheap mechanical keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Included gaming mouse
  • Tactile feedback
  • Fully custom RGB LEDs
Price: $47.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
aula sapphire mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Compact and durable
  • Clicky custom Blue switches
  • Low price tag
Price: $45.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
blackwidow lite cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Fully custom RGB LEDs
  • Clicky Otemu blue switches
  • Full 104-key array
Price: $39.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
logitech g910 mechanical keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Tactile Romer-G switches
  • Dedicated media hotkeys
  • Fully custom RGB LEDs
Price: $99.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
ducky cheap mech keyboard
  • High-quality PBT caps
  • Cherry MX switches
  • Compact and durable
Price: $89.00 Shop now at mechanicalkeyboards.com Shop now Read our review
redragon k556 mechanical keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Tactile Brown switches
  • Durable design
  • Fully custom RGB LEDs
Price: $59.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
blackwidow lite cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Brightness-adjustable white LEDs
  • Small footprint
  • Multimedia hotkeys
Price: $64.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
roccat suora keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Fully custom RGB LEDs
  • Tactile feedback
  • Compact and durable
Price: $249.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
azio mechanical keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Tactile Brown switches
  • Compact and durable
  • Adjustable LEDs
Price: $49.88 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
velocifire cheap mech keyboard
  • Full 104-key array
  • ABS double-shot key caps
  • Blue backlit keys
Price: $45.99 Shop now at velocifiretech.com Shop now Read our review
gigabyte mech keyboard
  • Cherry MX switches
  • Full 104-key array
  • Windows key lock
Price: $91.19 Shop now at newegg.com Shop now Read our review
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  • Backlit keys
  • Tactile and clicky Blue switches
  • Compact and durable
Price: $32.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
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  • Cherry MX switches
  • Fully programmable keys
  • Multimedia hotkeys
Price: $76.49 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
hyperx cheap mech keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Cherry MX Red switches
  • Brightness-adjustable red LEDs
  • Detachable USB cable
Price: $88.74 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
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  • 104-key array
  • Blue backlit keys
  • Multimedia shortcuts
Price: $43.97 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Our Unbiased Reviews
  1. 1. Havit Backlit Wired Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Included gaming mouse
    • Tactile feedback
    • Fully custom RGB LEDs
    Cons:
    • Thin key caps
    • Large desk footprint
    • Blue switches can be quite loud

    The Havit Mechanical Gaming Keyboard is a great deal for new PC builders. Not only do you get a solid mechanical keyboard but it also comes bundled with a 7-button gaming mouse. Havit also offers a slightly pricier bundle with a wired headset in addition to the keyboard and mouse, while still keeping you under budget. But for comparison’s sake, we’ll try to focus on just the keyboard itself.

    The Havit mechanical keyboard is a full-size keyboard with Jixian Blue switches. We aren’t as familiar with this brand as we are with other Cherry MX Blue clones but they are more or less equivalent for delivering loud and clicky feedback. This keyboard also sports full RGB backlighting, which can be customized key-by-key using the free Havit software. The keyboard has a basic suite of media shortcuts, plus some shortcut for cycling through the preset lighting patterns and adjusting brightness. The Havit keyboard also includes a detachable wrist rest to further sweeten the pot. All in all, this keyboard delivers an impressive value in its price range.

  2. 2. Beastron Sapphire LED Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Compact and durable
    • Clicky custom Blue switches
    • Low price tag
    Cons:
    • Blue switches can be quite loud
    • No color-changing LEDs means no color mapping
    • No number pad

    The Beastron Sapphire Mechanical Keyboard offers a compact 104-key mech keyboard for an almost unbeatable price but it doesn’t have the same level of customization you may have come to expect from top brands. Though this board looks like it has fully custom RGB LEDs, it is actually what’s called a rainbow board, which is permanently set to display this same striped color configuration. It still has eight preset lighting effects but they are all different variations on pulsating brightness rather than actual color-changing switches.

    But just because they aren’t fully customizable doesn’t make these LEDs any less effective at actually illuminating the key legends. Additionally, you are getting a great typing experience with the generic blue switches, which provide a loud, clicky, and feedback-driven experience. Many typists prefer this as it provides an audible cue that the keystroke has registered.

    There are several versions of this keyboard, and some of the pricier ones have a number pad. While this one does not, it does have built-in media shortcuts. It also has the ever-handy windows lock key, which helps prevent interruptions while gaming.

    Beastron definitely keeps things simple with this design, but if a colorful and functional keyboard that frees extra space on your desk by skipping on the ten key numpad, then consider this pick.

  3. 3. Aukey 104-Key Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Fully custom RGB LEDs
    • Clicky Otemu blue switches
    • Full 104-key array
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • Blue switches can be quite loud
    • Hardwired USB cable
    This full-size mechanical keyboard from Aukey is a fantastic entry point into the world of mechanical keyboards. Its combination of clicky Otemu Blue switches and full RGB backlighting leaves little left to be desired from budget users. This LED-illuminated board allows you to cycle through 14 preset lighting effects or painstakingly customize your own design without software needed. You can also adjust the brightness for the whole board.
     
    Behind each raised keycap is an Otemu blue switch. Blues are the loudest switch available but they are also more or less specially weighted for gaming. Their springy, tactile feel makes them great for developing your twitch reflexes for the big leagues.
     
    Because the key caps are raised, the LEDs beneath reflect quite a bit off the brushed aluminum frame, adding to the vibrant look of this keyboard. The metal board is heavy and durable, which is nice to see on a budget board even though it makes it harder to transport. The only build-quality shortcoming is the hardwired USB cable.
  4. 4. Logitech G910 Orion Backlit Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Tactile Romer-G switches
    • Dedicated media hotkeys
    • Fully custom RGB LEDs
    Cons:
    • Collects fingerprints easily
    • Bulky design
    • High price tag

    Between its 113-key layout, dedicated media keys, phone stand, and detachable wrist rest, the Logitech’s G910 Orion is an absolute behemoth of a keyboard. And despite its rich feature set the G910 is still a budget keyboard. One way Logitech cuts costs is by producing their own customer Romer-G switches. These closely compare to Cherry MX Brown switches, which are tactile and comparatively quiet. The Romer-Gs even spring back slightly faster while still requiring the same actuation force.

    And though the switches are probably the main attraction, this keyboard offers lots of other features that might entice gamers. The RGB backlighting is fully customizable, so if you think the preset rainbow patterns are a bit much, then just set them to solid white so it looks more like the beloved G610 Orion. The G910 also has 9 programmable macro keys that can be configured via an accompanying software to bind different keystroke sequences to one button. It also has dedicated play/pause, tracking, and mute buttons, plus a volume scroll wheel to match.

    As you can guess, though, this keyboard takes up a whole lot of space on your desk. Additionally, the acrylic wrist rest dock attracts fingerprints easily. But that said, if you like customize and tweak settings, this is the best budget mechanical keyboard to satiate your urges.

  5. 5. Ducky One PBT LED Keyboard

    Pros:
    • High-quality PBT caps
    • Cherry MX switches
    • Compact and durable
    Cons:
    • Not backlit
    • No multimedia shortcuts
    • Feet slide around somewhat
    Ducky is one of the most popular mechanical keyboard brands around as their classic Ducky One PBT is still one of the only keyboards to offer PBT keycaps for under $100. In fact, this is where the slightly higher price of this 87-key keyboard comes from, as PBT key caps are significantly more durable than the ABS plastic you get with other keyboards in this price range. They also provide a nice stippled texture on the keycaps.
     
    The price also goes towards the Ducky One’s Cherry MX brand keycaps. You can actually order this board with your choice of Black, Brown, Blue, Red, Silver, Green, White, or Clear switches, which gives you a lot of freedom to customize your typing experience. Unfortunately, these keys are not backlit despite having translucent legends. It is a bizarre choice but the backlighting is easy to live without if you are good at touch typing. Also note that there are no multimedia shortcuts built into the board.
     
    So while the Ducky One may be light on features, it still delivers an amazing combination of high-quality keycaps and switches. For those who want a focused typing experience without the distractions you get from “gaming” keyboards, then this is a great entry-level pick.
  6. 6. Redragon K556 RGB Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Tactile Brown switches
    • Durable design
    • Fully custom RGB LEDs
    Cons:
    • Keys occasionally make a ping sound
    • No wristt rest
    • Key caps could be better

    The Redragon K556 is an entry-level mechanical keyboard that combines full RGB lighting and a smooth and tactile typing experience at an affordable price. They use a custom-made analog to Cherry MX Brown switches, which have a slight tactile bump right before their actuation point. This unique feature allows you to register keystrokes without fully bottoming out your keys. They are well-suited for gaming and typing alike, but the RGB lighting is a dead giveaway that this keyboard is marketed towards PC gamers.

    Unfortunately, Redragon’s in-house switches fall short in one aspect. When a key is released to its home position it will sometimes make a tiny ping sound as the vibrations bounce off the metal base. This only happens when you type a certain way, though, so it is not a pervasive issue. Plus issues like this are to be expected from an RGB keyboard at this price point.

    The Redragon K556 has a number of preset lighting patterns and easy hotkeys to adjust the brightness on the fly. You can also use the free Redragon software to record macro commands and customize the LEDs switch-by-switch to color-code your most-used hotkeys. Though these features are limited in application, the K556 itself delivers a surprisingly solid typing experience for a cheap mechanical keyboard.

  7. 7. BlackWidow Lite Mechanical Tenkeyless Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Brightness-adjustable white LEDs
    • Small footprint
    • Multimedia hotkeys
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • So-so build quality
    • Hardwired USB cable

    The Razer Blackwidow Lite provides the same accurate performance as its full-size counterpart, albeit in a more compact and budget package. This tenkeyless keyboard is a great option if you have limited desk space or just prefer a keyboard with a small desk footprint. Even though it is compact, its keys are still normally spaced and have a normal amount of vertical travel.

    This keyboard uses proprietary Razer Orange switches, which are great for gaming or general data entry as well. They have a shallow activation point and have a slightly muffled (though still full audible) click. If you want them to be even quieter, you can use the included orange O-rings to further dampen the sounds of the switches. It also comes with a key puller and a hardwired, braided USB cable.

    The BlackWidow Lite has white LEDs under each key which makes them easier to see in a dark room. They can be adjusted for brightness but there aren’t many other color features you can do. The Razer Synapse 3 software can be used to set up macros and shortcuts if you so desire. There are a basic suite of multimedia controls bound to the function keys.

    While the keycaps on the BlackWidow Lite feel solid, the board itself is somewhat flimsy compared to other options. It has a metal top but is mostly plastic beneath, whereas other boards are full metal.. Still, this can be seen as a plus for those who want a portable keyboard that can be easily moved around between a few different PCs.

  8. 8. Roccat Suora FX Frameless Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Fully custom RGB LEDs
    • Solid tactile feedback from Brown switches
    • Compact and durable
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • No dedicated macro keys
    • Hardwired USB cable

    If you have limited desk space but still want a number pad and gaming-level performance, then the Roccat Suora FX is your go-to. The Suora’s hefty aluminum alloy base barely extends beyond the 104 keys, making for a nearly frameless look with a minimal desk footprint.

    Keep in mind that this minimalist approach means you won’t have extra luxuries like a wrist rest or an array of media keys. The only extra keys it offers are volume control keys, plus a Game Mode key which disables the Windows key. When in Game Mode, the keyboard also turns your navigation keys into six macro keys. This is a creative way to add more utility to this modest keyboard, but it will be frustrating if you already bind actions to your Insert or Delete keys.

    This keyboard uses Tactile TTC Blue switches, which compare closest to Cherry MX Blues. They have the same medium downward travel and tactile click at the bottom-out point, but they feel a bit lighter. They are ideal for typing and gaming. This board has n-key rollover, which means that you can press pretty much every button simultaneously without any ghosting. It also has a 1 ms polling rate, instantly registering any keystrokes.

    This keyboard offers the hotly desired custom RGB lighting, which can be customized key-by-key and can be programmed to follow several light patterns. As absolutely extra as RGB is, it is still helpful to have backlighting for late-night typing. There are also 11 different brightness levels if you find the lighting to be too much altogether. Most of these functions are handled by the Roccat Swarm software. Even if you took that away, though, you would still have a compact and well-built keyboard. That makes the Roccat Suora FX a great pick.

  9. 9. Azio Hue Red Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Tactile Brown switches
    • Compact and durable
    • White LED backlight with adjustable brightness
    Cons:
    • Wider keys might be clunky or squeaky
    • Number/symbol keys are printed backwards
    • No wrist rest

    The Azio Hue Red is a cheap mechanical keyboard that shows attention to detail with a huge selection of convenient and ergonomic features. This full-size keyboard sports shortcut keys and a number pad, all of which are illuminated by a simple white LED backlight.

    This is a nice departure from busy gamer designs and has adjustable brightness to keep you in control. There is also a Windows key lock for gaming, so you’ll never minimize your game mid-round again.

    Beneath the sturdy keycaps, the Hue Red sports Otemu Brown switches, a shallow and clicky tactile switch set that compares closest to the Cherry MX Browns. Otemu switches have a slightly heavier actuation weight, but they have about the same tactile bumps and actuation points as their name-brand counterparts.

    Only the most sensitive and feather-fingered typists will be able to tell the difference. If you normally bottom out your keys when you type, then the Otemu Brown switches will not affect your performance at all.

    The keyboard frame is high-quality all around, offering cool extras like a detachable wrist rest and volume controller. A red anodized aluminum faceplate holding everything together, though it also comes in black and blue.

    Aside from small nitpicks, the only real issue is that you will sometimes experience stickiness or a metallic rattling from the wider keys (space, shift, enter, backspace) because of an issue with the stabilizer wire that keeps the keys from tilting.

    At the end of the day, the Azio Hue Red is an elegant budget mechanical keyboard that stands as a viable alternative to top brands that are double the price.

  10. 10. Velocifire VM01 104-Key Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Full 104-key array
    • ABS double-shot key caps
    • Blue backlit keys
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • LED brightness cannot be adjusted
    • No feet to raise the keyboard

    The Velocifire VM01 may not have the colorful flair of a high-end mechanical keyboard but it sports high-end switches and keycaps at a value price. This keyboard has ABS double-shot key caps, which are thicker and more durable than normal ABS key caps (though still not as nice as PBT key caps). It adds a nice premium feel when you are typing on it.

    The switches underneath the VM01 are Otemu Browns, which are significantly quieter than blue switches while still being considerably louder than a regular membrane keyboard. Otemu Browns have a tactile bump for responsive feedback so gamers looking to engage that twitch reflex can lightly glide across their keyboards. The keys are backlit in a teal-ish blue but you cannot adjust their brightness or animate them, which feels a little low-tech.

    Also absent from the VM01 package are adjustable feet and a wrist rest. These features aren’t for everyone but I consider them essential ergonomic elements if you spend as much time at your keyboard as I do. Still, this is a decently built keyboard and is still a great pick for the price.

  11. 11. Gigabyte GK-Force K83 RED

    Pros:
    • Cherry MX switches
    • Full 104-key array
    • Windows key lock helps prevent gaming interruptions
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • Hardwired USB cable
    • Not backlit

    If you are after the tactile feedback of some top-tier Cherry Red MX switches, then Gigabyte’s GK-Force K83 RED keyboard is one of the best cheap mechanical keyboards you’ll find. Simply put, you won’t find a keyboard that packs mechanical switches of the same tier for cheaper.

    Now, are the name brand switches really that much better than generic switches? Not as much as you’d think, but they are still a point of pride for gamers who like to do things by the books. Plus, their half-click activation point and tactile feedback make them great for gaming regardless of their pedigree.

    The GK-Force K83 is a full-size 104-key keyboard with a number pad and its function row has secondary media functions. This keyboard has N-key rollover and a Windows lock key, which is helpful to prevent accidental interruptions while fullscreen gaming.

    Since most of this keyboard’s budget goes towards high-end switches, it is sparse on extra features. There is no LED backlighting or wrist rests on this keyboard. On the plus side, this keyboard is easy to clean because of its island-style keys. If you don’t mind its no-frills layout, the Gigabyte GK-Force K83 mech keyboard is a cost-efficient option for high-performance gaming or data entry.

  12. 12. MageGee Blue Switch LED Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Backlit keys
    • Tactile and clicky Blue switches
    • Compact and durable
    Cons:
    • Blue switches can be quite loud
    • No color-changing LEDs means no color mapping
    • Limited multimedia controls

    The MageGee Blue Switch LED Mechanical Keyboard is an absolute gem for gamers on a budget. This compact 87-key keyboard delivers incredible performance for gaming or typing at an almost unheard of price. The reason this keyboard is so inexpensive is that it uses generic blue switches instead of name brand Cherry MX Blues.

    They are CK Blues, which come from a Chinese brand that is functionally identical. Despite being clones, these CK blue switches feel fantastic to type on. Their anti-ghosting and key travel compare closely to Cherry MX Blue switches, the standard switches you find on high-end mech keyboards. One difference with blue switches is that they are some of the loudest and clickiest you’ll find. This is good if you like auditory feedback, but bad if you share a workspace.

    This compact keyboard forgoes a number pad so that it takes up very little desktop space. Just make sure you have a calculator handy for crunching numbers. This MageGee keyboard has multimedia functions to open certain apps and adjust volume. Standard play/pause and tracking controls are absent though.

    The keys are backlit with a rainbow configuration of LEDs, which can be toggled on or off for night use. Do not get this rainbow LED configuration confused with proper RGB lights, as the individual keys do not change color. You can simply cycle through different configurations of static LEDs. All in all, the high build quality and responsive switches of this keyboard leave you little to complain about for the price.

  13. 13. Corsair K66 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Cherry red switches are great for gaming
    • Fully programmable keys
    • Multimedia hotkeys
    Cons:
    • Hardwired USB cable
    • Large desk footprint
    • No wrist rest

    The Corsair K66 is a no-nonsense cheap mechanical keyboard that puts performance before presentation. This keyboard forgoes fancy RGB LEDs and accessories to bring high-performance switches to an inexpensive package. The K66 delivers smooth linear key travel thanks to its Cherry MX Red switches, which are the standard switches you’d expect to find on high-end mech keyboards.

    These keys are notably quieter than budget switches, while still offering fast travel and tactile feedback. They support full key rollover, which means if you pressed every key down at once, it would register every single one. It is also fully anti-ghosting, further improving accuracy.

    This 104-key model has a full number pad, plus dedicated media hotkeys. My personal favorite inclusion is the windows key lock, which prevents you from accidentally switching to your desktop in the middle of a full-screen game. Corsair’s free CUE software allows you to fully reprogram this keyboard. The most useful application is setting up macro commands to streamline your work or gaming.

    Ultimately, this keyboard is best suited to gaming, but those who want a silent and tactile typing experience will have a fantastic time using this keyboard as well.

  14. 14. HyperX Alloy FPS Pro 87-Key Mechanical Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Cherry Red switches are great for gaming
    • Brightness-adjustable red LEDs
    • Detachable USB cable
    Cons:
    • Thin key caps
    • Wider keys might be clunky or squeaky
    • No wrist rest

    The HyperX Alloy FPS Pro is a simple yet effective budget mechanical keyboard that lends itself equally well to gaming or data entry with its Cherry MX Red switches. This board actually ships with your choice of Red, Blue, or Brown switches (depending on availability) and comes in an 87-key or 104-key version. We highlighted the 87-key version because it matches the minimalist design of this board.

    The HyperX Allow FPS may not have any RGB lighting but it does have a red LED backlight that can be adjusted for brightness or programmed to follow basic patterns. Generally, these pulsing and flashing patterns don’t look as cool with just one color so this feels more like a gimmick on this board.

    What doesn’t feel like a gimmick is the Cherry MX switches, which basically represent the industry standard for mechanical keyboards. Once you feel how well this budget keyboard types, you’ll be a convert.

    Its steel frame is heavy yet durable and it connects to your PC via a detachable braided USB cable. It has secondary media control keys for basic playback functions.

    This device is not without its flaws, though. Its keycaps feel thin. Additionally, wide keys that need stabilizers will sometimes rattle or squeak. These flaws are easy to look past when you consider the price point of the HyperX Allow FPS. As far as using this for an entry-level mechanical keyboard, you won’t be disappointed.

  15. 15. EagleTec KG011

    Pros:
    • Full 104-key array with tactile blue switches
    • Blue backlit keys
    • Multimedia shortcuts
    Cons:
    • Hardwired USB cable
    • So-so build quality
    • No wrist rest

    The KG011 from EagleTec is one of the best cheap mechanical keyboards because it offers a full-size layout, a unique aesthetic, and solid typing performance at a value price. The board comes in black or white and has a nice brushed aluminum finish t stand out from the crowd. Unfortunately, the base is mostly made from plastic so it is lighter and flexier than keyboards with full metal bases.

    The blue switches from Otemu are a fine Cherry clone, proving that relying on brand names can be a pitfall. They are just as tactile and clicky as other Blue-style switches while being considerably cheaper. The keys are backlit with a solid blue LED scheme that has 6 brightness levels and 9 preset light effects. The keys have some simple multimedia shortcuts but there is no fancy stuff like macro support. Despite its fairly basic design, the EagleTec KG011 keyboard delivers everything you need and looks great with any white-colored setup.

What Are the Advantages of a Mechanical Keyboard?

Individual mechanical switches beneath each key in this type of keyboard offer a number of advantages. The biggest benefit is an improved tactile response that speeds up typing. When you hear the click of a mechanical switch, you instantly know that your keystroke has registered and that you can move onto the next one.

The most feather-fingered typists use this satisfying click as a signal that they've depressed the key far enough, and can now begin the next keystroke. With a bit of practice, you can use this technique to type entire paragraphs without bottoming out your keys once. You'll notice an immediate improvement in typing speed to match.

Mechanical keyboard can also be more easily customized than membrane keyboards. Most mechanical keyboards out there (and all of the ones we reviewed here) have the same stem profile, which means you can add custom keycaps to your keyboard to give it an even more unique look.

Mechanical keyboards do have some downsides, though. They are loud and heavy, so they don't work well in shared workspaces. They are also often quite expensive. But even if your budget for peripherals is tight, a budget mechanical keyboard will far outperform a traditional membrane keyboard.

How We Picked the Best Cheap Mechanical Keyboards

There are a lot of moving parts underneath each mechanical keyboard, so there is an almost overwhelming number of factors to consider when shopping for an inexpensive mechanical keyboard.

The most important factor is the style of switches that are used on the keyboard as well as which brand manufactures them. This article from Tom's Guide outlines the core differences between common switches like Blues, Reds, and Browns. However, the best way to familiarize yourself with these switches is to try them out.

We considered a variety of switch styles for this roundup since each switch type is better suited for different task loads. That said, you will also find a number of brands other than Cherry amongst these offerings. Cherry keys still tend to have the best longevity out of all available options but other "off-brands" still tend to perform just as well.

See Also

11 Best Cherry MX Blue Keyboards: The Ultimate List

9 Best Cherry MX Red Keyboards: The Ultimate List

11 Best Cherry MX Brown Keyboards: The Ultimate List

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