11 Best Wireless Gaming Headsets for PC

Gamer using a wireless headset

123RF (Dean Drobot) Gamer playing at a PC using a wireless headset.

When it comes to gaming, audio is all too often an afterthought. The difference between good and bad graphics is easy to see, and that means many gamers race to have the best video card they can afford. But don’t neglect your audio — you might not realize it right away, but a poor sound system can ruin the gaming experience just as thoroughly as bad visuals. Indistinct dialog can make it hard to follow the action; anemic bass can ruin your sense of immersion, and sketchy surround sound means you may have trouble knowing where your enemies are. And in case you’re wondering, gamers have been debating whether surround sound is important in gaming for decades. The verdict is in: It is, even if it’s just virtual surround.

The shortest path to great sound is often a gaming headset, and the ultimate in convenience is a wireless gaming headset. Wireless headsets have come a long, long way in the last few years. These days, a good pair of wireless headphones can sound amazing, and give you the comfort and convenience you need from something you’ll probably wear on your head for hours at a time. There are a lot of headphones out there competing for your gaming dollars, and knowing which is best isn’t always obvious. So in addition to getting a great wireless gaming mouse and a high-powered gaming laptop, it’s time for a wireless gaming headset. I’ve rounded up the 11 best wireless gaming headphones for your gaming needs.

What Are the Best Wireless Gaming Headphones For Sale in 2020?

Audeze Mobius wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Planar magnetic drivers
  • 3D positional surround sound
  • Comfortable
Price: $399.00 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Corsair VOID RGB Elite wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Aggressive gamer styling
  • RGB lighting
  • Easy wireless setup
Price: $139.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
HyperX Cloud Flight S wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Qi wireless charging
  • No-hassle surround sound
  • Great battery life
Price: $159.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Logitech G935 wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Great gamer aesthetic
  • Compatible with PS4 and Switch
  • Programmable light strip
Price: $119.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Razer Nari Ultimate wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Haptic feedback in games
  • Good battery life with lighting off
  • RGB lighting
Price: $199.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Asus ROG Strix Fusion 700 wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Comfortable
  • Good RGB light effects
  • One-touch surround
Price: $285.00 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Sennheiser GSP 670 wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Programmable button
  • Good virtual surround sound
  • Greast bass
Price: $290.76 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
SteelSeries Arctis 7 wireless gaming headphones Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Extremely comfortable
  • Excellent battery life
  • Superb sound quality
Price: $219.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
SteelSeries Arctis Pro wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Excellent fit and comfort
  • Great sound quality
  • Share audio with another headset
Price: $329.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Turtle Beach Elite Atlas Aero wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Very comfy
  • 30 hour battery life
  • Superhuman Hearing mode
Price: $146.95 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Astro A50 wireless gaming headset Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Charging cradle
  • Quite comfortable
  • Impressive bass
Price: $299.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Our Unbiased Reviews
  1. 1. Audeze Mobius

    Pros:
    • Planar magnetic drivers for superb audio quality
    • 3D positional surround sound
    • Comfortable
    Cons:
    • Only wireless option is Bluetooth
    • Positional audio doesn't work in wireless mode
    • Very short battery life

    Weight: 15 ounces | Battery life: 10 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: No | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4, Xbox 

    Audeze is best known as a high-end audio manufacturer, so when the company decides to release a gaming headset, it’s worth taking notice. The Audeze Mobius started its life as part of an Indiegogo campaign centered around the idea of immersive cinematic 3D audio, and the headset is now available at retail. 

    While the headset offers both wireless and wired operation, the emphasis is on using it wired. You can connect it to your PC via USB or an AUX audio cable, but there’s no low-latency 2.4 GHz wireless mode — it’s just straight Bluetooth, which means you might run into some audio quality issues if you try playing games wirelessly. Interestingly, the headphones rely on internal battery power both while on Bluetooth (naturally) and when connected via an audio cable. The headset operates without the battery when connected via USB. As an aside, this is a great headphone for general-purpose entertainment, so you can plug it directly into a home theater receiver to watch video on your TV. 

    What really distinguishes the headphones, though, is the fact that they’re driven by planar magnetic tech. Planar drivers are an alternative to the moving coils found in most headphones. Based on a thin diaphragm with embedded conductors and suspended between magnets, planar drivers can reproduce sound far more precisely than ordinary headphones. Combined with that, the Mobius uses Waves Nx head-tracking technology. It measures the orientation of your head and keeps music positioned correctly in space around you, no matter how you turn your head. It’s almost magical. 

    The Mobius’ 3D audio enhances games as well, making it easier to tell where sounds are coming from based on how you turn your head. Unfortunately, these 3D effects are only available when you use the headphones in USB mode — so while you can use the headset for wireless operation, you’re missing out on its best features when you do. 

  2. 2. Corsair VOID RGB Elite

    Pros:
    • Aggressive gamer styling
    • RGB lighting
    • Easy wireless setup
    Cons:
    • Not super comfortable
    • Mediocre battery life
    • Glitchy microphone controls

    Weight: 14.1 ounces | Battery life: 16 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: Yes | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4 

    Not surprisingly, the Corsair Void Pro RGB Wireless is based on the successful Void RGB headset, so it is starting with a great pedigree. For starters, there’s a trend these days for headset makers to produce more understated designs, but the Void bucks that movement with an undeniably gamer-forward style. The cups are angular and aggressive, and the flip-up microphone (which mutes when raised) has a thick stalk. The whole thing has a masculine feel. And of course, it includes RGB lighting on the Corsair logo on the sides that’s fully programmable from the desktop software.

    It wears okay; you’ll find sufficient padding on the cups and head, but you might find it uncomfortable for extended gaming sessions. And the overall feel of the headphones is a little plastic-y. It’s fine for the gaming room, but doesn’t have the sort of premium look and feel that you’ll want to show off when you’re not gaming. 

    Like most wireless headsets, the Void relies on a USB dongle to transmit the 2.4 GHz wireless signal. Setup is virtually effortless, so you can move the dongle easily between the PC and PS4. On the PC, you can use the desktop software to enable virtual surround sound, control the RGB lighting, and change EQ settings. The headphones are pretty well balanced right out of the gate, sounding good for both music and games, without undue emphasis on bass. Weirdly, though, you might find that the flip-up microphone is a little glitchy. It tends to mute when raised without issue, but doesn’t always come back on as intended when you lower it. 

  3. 3. HyperX Cloud Flight S

    Pros:
    • Qi wireless charging
    • No-hassle surround sound
    • 30 hour battery life
    Cons:
    • No Qi charging pad included
    • No option for wired use
    • Mediocre microphone

    Weight: 11.4 ounces | Battery life: 30 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: None | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4

    The HyperX Cloud Flight S is a solid mid-level headset that brings some interesting things to the table while being among the more affordable wireless gaming headsets you can buy. Visually, it’s not a lot to look at. The design is simple, lacks a serious “gaming” vibe, yet it doesn’t go out of its way to look professional, either. In other words, they look a little cheap. And don’t expect miracles from the fit; the ear cups are well padded, but the headband tends to wear a little heavy after extended gaming sessions. 

    But set those concerns aside, and you get a headset that sounds quite good, with a pronounced low end — something that benefits most games — and a big feature that makes it stand out from the crowd. The Cloud Flight S has Qi wireless charging. If you have a Qi wireless charging pad, just set this headset down when you’re done playing, and it’ll always be fully charged and ready to go. There’s no Qi pad included in the box, which is something of a bummer, but you could argue that if you already own one, such as for your iPhone or Android wireless charging phone, at least you’re not paying for it twice. Even so, Qi-compatible devices are rare enough that it seems like an oversight not to include one. 

    The headset uses 2.4 GHz wireless rather than Bluetooth to deliver low-latency, reliable audio, and the dongle is easily swapped between your PC and PS4. Even better: You get virtual surround sound on both the PC and PSA4 without any software tinkering, which is rare. Unfortunately, these headphones have no wired option whatsoever — if the battery dies, so does the gaming session. So even though the Cloud Flight S has a very healthy 30-hour battery life, you best keep it charged. My advice: Make sure you get a Qi charging pad and remember to use it.  

  4. 4. Logitech G935

    Pros:
    • Great gamer aesthetic
    • Compatible with PS4 and Switch
    • Programmable light strip
    Cons:
    • Sound quality isn't stellar
    • Short battery life
    • A little bulky

    Weight: 13.3 ounces | Battery life: 8-12 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: Yes | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4, Nintendo Switch

    Great looking, but not the best choice for audiophiles. The Logitech G935 manages to let you know it’s a headset for gamers without going over the top on aggressive styling; the earcups have a cool geometric shape — not angular, more just sort of like futuristic rectangles. And while some headsets light up the brand’s logo and call it a day, the G935 has an LED strip that goes around each ear — if you like lights, you’ll love this. But now the bad news: The anemic 12-hour battery life drops to just 8 hours if you leave the lighting on. 

    As for comfort, the G935 is certainly adequate, but like any headphones with a padded headband, it can feel like it’s biting into your skull after a while. You’ll find a trio of programmable buttons on the left earcup, which you can configure form the desktop dashboard software. To get up and running, you simply need to insert the USB transmitter dongle in your PC’s USB port — that activates the 2.4 GHz wireless. You can also connect the headphones wirelessly to a PS4 or Switch, and to make it easy to transport the headset, the USB dongle can be stored in a small cubby in one of the earcups. 

    Overall, these headphones sound quite good, with a deep emphatic on bass that complements games, but lacks enough high end that it’s not ideal for listening to music. They’re not the best-sounding headphones on the market, but if the gamer aesthetic appeals to you, you just might think they’re the best-looking. 

  5. 5. Razer Nari Ultimate

    Pros:
    • Haptic feedback in games
    • Good battery life using 2.4 Ghz
    • RGB lighting
    Cons:
    • Poor 8 hour battery life when RGB lights are on
    • Fairly ordinary audio quality
    • Large, bulky earcups

    Weight: 15.2 ounces | Battery life: 8-20 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: Yes | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4

    These earcups are oversized for a very good reason. Your first impression with the Razer Nari Ultimate is probably going to be something like, “those are incredibly thick earcups.” Indeed, the headphones look oversized, like someone went a little overboard with the padding. But what’s hiding inside these oversized earcups is Razer’s haptic feedback engine. 

    Razer’s HyperSense is a haptic engine that is designed to allow the headphones to rumble in response to specific audio signals from your game, like gunfire and explosions. That sounds intriguing, and it can be fun in practice, though you might find that it’s ultimately fatiguing and perhaps best in smaller doses. But there’s an undeniable appeal to feeling the vibration that does along with the soundscape of combat. You may want to turn it off if you’re playing a game that triggers a near-constant haptic response, though, like the hoof-falls of your horse in Red Dead Redemption. 

    Otherwise, the Nari Ultimate sits at the top of a family of Nari headsets and also features some simple RGB lighting — the Razer logo on both earcups illuminate. The earcups are generously padded and feature an inner, auto-adjusting headband to balance the weight on your noggin. Because this is a Razer headset, the desktop dashboard software is exemplary and offers a lot of ways to customize the audio (as well as control the RGB lighting). 

    And setting aside the haptics, the Nari Ultimate is a solid and good-sounding set of headphones, but there are certainly better models in this roundup.  It’s great that these headphones can do double duty on your PS4, and the THX Spatial 7.1 virtual surround sound is helpful for certain games. And if you do want to use these headphones for music, it’s handy that the microphone retracts. But these aren’t absolute best-in-class performers. 

  6. 6. ROG Strix Fusion 700

    Pros:
    • Comfortable
    • Good RGB light effects
    • One-touch surround
    Cons:
    • Wireless is Bluetooth-only
    • Short battery life
    • Annoying low-battery warning

    Weight: 15 ounces | Battery life: 8-17 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: Yes | Cross-platform compatibility: PC only

    While you can use the Asus ROG Strix Fusion 700 as a wireless headset thanks to the built-in Bluetooth, it’s clear that this wasn’t the primary design consideration when Asus designed it. You can connect this headset to your PC, PS4, or Switch via USB, but the Bluetooth is there if you want to connect to the PC wirelessly. The wired mode delivers goodies like enhanced signal processing and virtual surround sound, though that’s regrettably not available when using Bluetooth.

    That said, this is one of the sharpest-looking headsets you’re likely to run across. The clearly premium design is neither the understated flat black minimalist approach nor the angular, aggressive light-up gamer vibe. It finds its own path, with beautiful faceted glossy earcups and a strip of LED lighting on each side. The LED lighting works with Asus’ Aura Sync software, and you can synchronize the headset lighting to other Asus peripherals for your own personal light show. When using the lights, you should get about 8 hours of battery life; turn it off, and you can run the headphones for 17 hours. Either way, be prepared for a battery warning alert seemingly designed to warn of approaching zombies or nuclear alert; it’s so loud and persistent that it can ruin the experience of using these headphones.

    It’s also a fairly comfortable headset, with generous padding and a relatively loose fit — it doesn’t slide around, but neither does it clamp down on your head like a vice. The left earcup has a dedicated button to control the 7.1 virtual surround sound, and side of the cup is where you slide your finger around to control most features — like column and track control — via touch controls. This generally works ok, but it’s prone to a lot more errors than traditional tactile buttons. If you spend a lot of time listening to music, you’ll also appreciate the fact that the microphone flips up and sort of disappears into the earcup.

    In the end, this is a solid gaming headset and the audio quality is excellent overall, but the wireless capabilities are more of an afterthought — if you truly want to play without wires, this headset might not be the best choice. That said, Asus does make some truly outstanding wireless gear, including the Asus ROG Spatha gaming mouse. You can read all about it in 9 Best Wireless Gaming Mouse.

  7. 7. Sennheiser GSP 670

    Pros:
    • Programmable button
    • Good virtual surround sound
    • Greast bass
    • Dual wireless connectivity
    Cons:
    • Mediocre battery life on Bluetooth
    • Very expensive
    • Crowded design

    Weight: 14 ounces | Battery life: 15-20 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: None | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4

    Sennheiser may not have a lot of experience making gaming headsets, but it is definitely a veteran when it comes to both consumer and high-end audio. The Sennheiser GSP 670 is a strong entry into the wireless headset space, using the same audio drivers as the well-reviewed GSP 600 wired gaming headset. It uses a dual-wireless solution that combines Bluetooth with a higher-quality 2.4 GHz USB transmitter; you can connect the headphones to anything via Bluetooth, but the lossless, low-latency 2.4 GHz system is ideal for PC gaming. 

    The headphones are bulky but attractive, in an industrial way, and the beefy flip-up microphone makes it look like a headset you’d wear as an air traffic controller. They’re among the heavier headsets you’ll encounter, but are comfortable despite a snug fit — that said, you can adjust the tension with a pair of convenient controls. Sound quality is as good as you’d expect from a Sennheiser product, and the headphones seem especially balanced to emphasize bass — ideal for a set of gaming headphones. Sennheiser also features a great desktop control panel for tweaking the sound profile. You can enable a 7.1-channel virtual srurround sound mode, as well as a feature that accentuates positional cues for hearing approaching enemies. And the headset has a relatively rare feature: A programmable button you can assign to any task you like, configurable using the desktop software. 

    The GSP 670 delivers a solid 20 hours of battery life when using Bluetooth, but closer to 17 hours when using the proprietary 2.4 GHz wireless. And when it comes to cross-compatibility with game consoles, you can use this headset with your PS4 (but only your PS4) as well. 

    And while Sennheiser has some excellent headphones, the company also offers a superb noise-cancelling earbud as well. 

  8. 8. SteelSeries Arctis 7

    Pros:
    • Extremely comfortable
    • Excellent battery life
    • Superb sound quality
    • Also compatible with consoles
    Cons:
    • A little weak on bass
    • Not flashy (if yoyu like that sort of thing)
    • No surround if you use it with consoles

    Weight: 12.5 ounces | Battery life: 24 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: None | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4, Xbox, Nintendo Switch

    Many headsets pump out high-quality audio and are otherwise unimpeachable, yet are hard to recommend because they’re just too darned uncomfortable. Not so with the SteelSeries Arctis 7, which features what SteelSeries refers to as a ski goggle suspension band — a self-adjusting secondary band that sits under the primary band and distributes the weight comfortably across your head. It’s far from unique — many headsets use a similar self-adjusting band — but it’s always welcome when we run into it. The AirWeave ear cushions are similarly comfy, more like pillows for your ears than typical memory foam earcups. 

    Now that the question of comfort is out of the way, the Arctis 7 is a superb set of wireless headphones. Rather than relying on Bluetooth — which is sometimes problematic for audio — it comes with a 2.4 GHz transmitter puck, which offers lossless audio with ultra-low latency. The desktop software offers DTS Headphone:X v2 surround sound. 

    Visually, the headphones look the part. The premium design looks professional and classy. Of course, that might not be your jam; you might prefer more of a “gamer” look, with RGB lighting. If that’s the case, move on to something like the Logitech G935. But if you like a more subtle appearance from your headset, you’ll be rewarded with very accurate audio (though it does lack a little bass at the bottom), an impressive 24 hours of battery life, and even some multi-platform compatibility. You can use this headset with your consoles, including Xbox (wired only), PS4, and even the Nintendo Switch. (You’ll lose surround sound on the consoles, though.)

  9. 9. SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless

    Pros:
    • Excellent fit and comfort
    • Great sound quality
    • Can connect to PS4 and PC simultaneously
    • Share audio with another headset
    Cons:
    • Pricey
    • Need to swap batteries frequently
    • Microphone quality lacking

    Weight: 13 ounces | Battery life: 10 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: None | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4

    You can spend a lot of money on a wireless gaming headset, and the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless is living proof of that. But this is a headset that seems like it’s worth the price tag. Start with the fit: SteelSeries uses a second auto-adjusting band that effortlessly distributes the weight of the headphones on the top of your head. This is a brilliant design and it’s a shame all manufacturers don’t do something similar. 

    The headset extends the premium experience to the look and feel — it’s a classy but understated set of cans, with great controls on the cup. One feature you don’t see very often: You can share your audio with another set of headphones by plugging an AUX cable into a port on the Arctis Pro and then plugging that into the input on another headset. In addition, the microphone is mounted on a very flexible stem which retracts into the cup when you’re not using it. You could wear these headphones around in public without looking like you work at the drive-through of a fast-food restaurant. 

    The Arctis Pro Wireless uses dual wireless radios, and unlike many headphones, both can be active at the same time. That means you can be connected to your PC using the 2.4 GHz transmitter while simultaneously listening to music on your phone via Bluetooth. Instead of a simple dongle, the Arctis Pro includes a fairly elaborate transmitter with an OLED status display. You can use the transmitter box to balance game and chat volume, tweak your audio and even equalize the sound without referring to the desktop dashboard software. That’s pretty handy. 

    The transmitter has one other trick up its sleeve — it can charge a second battery. So while the Arctis Pro gets a meager 10 hours on a charge, a second battery is always charging on your desktop and can be swapped in seconds. 

    This headset also works with the PS4, but given the complexity of setting up up the transmitter box, you’ll probably only use it with one or the other — PC or PS4 — and rarely swap between the two. Unless you happen to have your PS4 co-located with your PC, that is. If you do, you can actually connect both at once, and enjoy the best of both worlds. 

  10. 10. Turtle Beach Elite Atlas Aero

    Pros:
    • Very comfy design, especially if you wear glassess
    • 30 hours of battery life
    • Excellent sound effects including Superhuman Hearing mode
    Cons:
    • Clumy controls
    • Surround sound is not as good as Dolby
    • Weak on bass

    Weight: 15 ounces | Battery life: 30 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: None | Cross-platform compatibility: PC only

    Right out of the box, it’s clear that Turtle Beach designed the Elite Atlas Aero to be an awesome portable gaming headset, designed with the same care as a specialized gaming mouse for hardcore gamers. It folds compactly, and the USB transmitter dongle which provides the 2.4 GHz wireless signal has its own storage cubby in one of the earcups so you don’t lose it while on the go. The headset’s generous 30-hour battery life further enhances the headset’s portability, since you may not need to charge it even over a weekend. 

    But the Elite Atlas Aero is about more than just portability. The earcups are generously padded, and include a small strap you can pull that causes an indent in the earcup padding, positioned to accommodate your eyeglass frames. It’s a great feature for eyeglass wearers, since it eases the pressure on your eyeglass frame and makes wearing the headset more tolerable or extended gaming sessions. 

    Turtle Beach’s desktop dashboard software is a little cluttered and confusing (much like the array of buttons and dials on the headset itself — not unworkable, but it takes some getting used to — but you can’t complain that it doesn’t deliver a ton of functionality. There are a lot of ways to customize the audio, including Waves Nx 3D Audio, which delivers adequate — though not as good as Dolby — virtual surround sound. Perhaps the best software feature is Superhuman Hearing, a digital processing mode that lets the audio emphasize footsteps, gunfire, and other environmental sounds to help you detect enemies more easily. Superhuman Hearing is assigned by default to a quick-access button on the headphones, so you can enable and disable it without resorting to opening the dashboard. 

     

  11. 11. Astro A50

    Pros:
    • Charging cradle
    • Quite comfortable
    • Impressive bass
    • Convenient chat and game audio mixer
    Cons:
    • Limited compatibility with consoles
    • Battery life is mediocre
    • Expensive

    Weight: 12.8 ounces | Battery life: 15 hours | Surround sound: Yes | RGB Lighting: None | Cross-platform compatibility: PC, PS4 or Xbox

    Even among gaming headsets, the Astro A50 is a fairly large, imposing set of cans. But the frame seems so oversized, in part, to accommodate the really thick and comfortable padding that that comes between you and both the earcups and the headband. It’s not the most comfortable headphones you can wear, but they truly are not objectionable, even for extended gameplay sessions. And it’s hard not to love some of the headset’s more thoughtful design touches. The microphone flexes wherever you’d like to position it, and you can pivot it straight up to mute the audio entirely. 

    It’s also visually distinctive; no other headset maker builds headphones around large vertical metal rails that connect the cups to the headband. It looks both rugged and one-of-a-kind. And that’s not all: The A50 comes with a base station that will attract attention on your desktop. The station might look like a charging station for the headset’s battery, and it is. Just place the headphones in the station when you’re done playing, and they’ll always be topped off. But this is also a 2.4 GHz transmitter, which ensures a solid signal, and connects to your PC so you can modify your sound settings. 

    If you want to use your headset not just with your PC, but also with your console, the news is mixed: You have to choose. The A50 comes in two flavors — a version that works with the PC and PS4, or one for the PC and Xbox.

    The A50 is a good-sounding headphone (and it should be, considering the price). The bass is definitely present, along with a solid midrange and clear, articulate dialog in games. One thing that the A50 does especially well is control the game and chat volume; it does this with a mixer, so you can control the balance between the two audio channels with a single control. That’s nice. One of the few things the headset is missing is active noise cancellation

    If you are so inclined, the A50 is mod kit-ready. You can replace the headband and ear cushions for even greater sound isolation, though this is an option you’ll have to pay extra for. Even without the upgrade, though, this is a formidable headset that you might consider adding to a high-end RTX 2080-powered laptop, or pairing with a PC flight stick for games like Elite: Dangerous and Microsoft Flight Simulator. 

     

Understanding Bluetooth vs 2.4GHz

You might wonder what the difference is between 2.4GHz and Bluetooth. Many wireless gaming headsets (as well as other wireless headsets) use 2.4GHz instead of Bluetooth. But… isn't Bluetooth a 2.4GHz wireless technology?

Yes, it is. Bluetooth operates in the 2.4GHz band, but the underlying Bluetooth architecture has some limitations when it comes to passing high-speed, high-bandwidth audio information. The solution is that a lot of headset makers bypass Bluetooth and implement their own proprietary wireless technology. Because the FCC has already allocated the spectrum, they also use 2.4GHz.

Since this 2.4GHz tech is fundamentally different than Bluetooth, it requires its own transmitter at the PC or gaming console, which is why most headsets include a USB dongle (or, in the case of the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless, a small hub) to carry the audio.

Is Bluetooth bad for gaming? Yeah, it is. Bluetooth sometimes has problems keeping up with high-fidelity sound and the audio quality can be compromised. And Windows itself doesn't help, so if you have a Bluetooth audio connection to your PC, expect hiccups. There's a reason most premium headphones ship with a 2.4GHz dongle.

How to Shop for a Wireless Gaming Headset

One thing a lot of people neglect, which is why I emphasize it in my reviews, is comfort. Remember, you'll be wearing these for hours at a time, and headsets that dig into your cranium will not be fun to wear. Look for padding in the earcups and a comfortable headband. The best headsets, in fact, generally rely on a self-adjusting bad that lets the headphones "float" on your head. There's also "clamping force" -- how tightly it hugs your head. You need a headset to grip your firmly so it doesn't flop around, but too much will give you a migraine.

If you are a real audiophile, you'll be looking for the same things in wireless gaming headsets as in any other audio gear, and it always helps if you can try out headsets in person before making a purchase decision. How do they actually sound? Are they balanced and neutral, or is there an unnatural or unflattering emphasis in the bass, midtones, or high end? What's the frequency response, and is there enough bass, especially for sound effects in games?

Of course, usability might be important to you -- or it might not. If you want to remap the buttons on the headset for use in games, for example, customization is important. But you might never use those features, and care more about surround sound or battery life. Headsets are very personal, which is why there's such a variety of models.

The Best Value in Wireless Gaming Headsets

Just a few years ago, wireless headsets were, to be frank, terrible, and you'd have to be a masochist to even try playing games with one. How times have changed: these days, there are many high-quality wireless gaming headsets, and even inexpensive ones can be excellent.

If money is absolutely no object, you'll probably want to choose the Astro A50, Sennheiser GSP 670, or SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless. Each one has a tremendous set of features and reasons to recommend it, but my money is on the Arctis Pro Wireless, which has great ergonomics, a combination wireless hub/battery charger, and audio sharing with another headphone user.

If style and RGB lighting is a priority for you, some of the coolest options include the Corsair VOID RGB Elite, Logitech G935, and Razer Nari Ultimate -- though the Razer wins out with the best sound quality of the three and extra like haptic feedback.

But if you're looking for the best overall value -- the optimal mix of features and price -- it's hard to recommend anything but the SteelSeries Arctis 7 or Turtle Beach Elite Atlas Aero. Both are quite affordable, especially compared to the high end in wireless gaming headsets. But both sound great and have excellent battery life, and Turtle Beach adds useful gaming extras like Superhuman Hearing audio processing.

See Also:

Disclaimer: Heavy Inc. is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and other affiliate advertising programs and may receive a commission if you purchase a product via a link on this page.