15 Best Dog Treat Pouches for Training

dog training treat pouch

123RF (Anna Koldunova)

There are many different types of treat pouch designs, but most dog treat pouches have an easy-open main compartment, a convenient attachment mechanism, and are typically made of a hard-wearing, machine washable material. Some have multiple pockets or pick-up bag dispensers built-in.

Tame your wild beast by keeping treats handy with options for the best dog training pouch:

What's the Best Dog Treat Pouch for Training?

ruffwear treat trader gifts for dog lovers Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Conforms to your hip
  • Accessory pocket
  • Durable
Price: $29.95 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
OneTigris Dog Treat Training Pouch Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Large capacity
  • Use with belt or with the clip
  • Overlapping opening for easy access
Price: $21.00 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Interior is easy to clean
  • Color options
  • Reflective
Price: $28.00 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Multiple pockets and functions
  • Convenient magnetic closure
  • Multiple color options
Price: $19.95 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Carabiner makes attachment easy
  • Reflective
  • Easy to use
Price: $11.95 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
FidosFavs Dog Walking/Training Pouch Bundle Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Modular system allows for flexible use
  • Includes water bottle holder
  • Bundle includes all the essentials for training
Price: $19.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Leashboss PackUp Pouch Dog Treat Training Waist Belt Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Secure and streamlined design better for runners
  • Four different compartments
  • Waste bag dispenser
Price: $19.98 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Starmark Triple Crown Pro Training Treat Pouch Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Easy access neoprene top
  • Great size
  • Durable
Price: $18.47 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Max & Molly Dog Treat Training Waist Bag Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Not immediately recognizable as a treat pouch
  • Waste bag dispenser
  • Three color options
Price: $19.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Pick-up bag dispenser
  • Generous capacity
  • Accessory pockets
Price: $12.97 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Paw Lifestyles treat pouch camping with dogs Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Very versatile with multiple pockets
  • Can be worn three ways
  • Integrated pick-up bag dispenser
Price: $28.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Generous capacity
  • Hinge opening
  • Storage pockets
Price: $15.95 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Inexpensive
  • Two sizes to choose from
  • Color options
Price: $10.98 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Inexpesnive
  • Large enough for a tennis ball
  • Belt clip attachment
Price: $6.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Generous capacity
  • Tough materials
  • Inexpensive
Price: $11.06 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Our Unbiased Reviews
  1. 1. Ruffwear Treat Trader

    Pros:
    • Curved top frame conforms to the hip
    • Additional accessory pocket could fit pick-up bags
    • Durable materials
    Cons:
    • Only available in one color
    • Must be hand washed
    • Somewhat narrow opening

    While most treat bags have a fairly conical shape, this may just be the only one curved to fit around your waist. The top of the unit is shaped by a metal support inside that contours well to the body when worn with either the included strap or clipped to your belt using the large, durable plastic clip on the back.

    Despite the relatively flat shape otherwise, the capacity is quite good and will hold a day’s worth of treats if you’re planning to train out on the trail. While it doesn’t have a dedicated pick-up bag dispenser (likely in deference to their separate pick-up bag dispenser which we’ll review on a later post), it does have a small accessory pocket into which a roll of bags fits. Finally there’s a small loop above the pocket for attaching a training clicker.

    The exterior is water-resistant, canvas-like material, while the inside is waterproof nylon that will prevent any seepage from oily treats. I have one of these and I like it a great deal. I’m not big on the contrasting red, so I just use it with the plastic belt clip.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Magnetic
    • Attachment style: Waist strap and belt clip
    • Size: 6 inches by 5.3 inches by 4.9 inches
  2. 2. OneTigris Dog Treat Training Pouch

    Pros:
    • Large capacity
    • Use with belt or with the clip
    • Overlapping opening for easy access
    Cons:
    • May be overly large for some
    • Only one color available
    • Could spill some if tipped over

    We included a OneTigris option on our best dog hiking backpacks post because they make a range of rugged dog gear, including this training pouch. Like most of their offerings, it’s loosely based on tactical gear with the olive colorway and 1000 denier nylon construction.

    This is larger than a lot of other options, holding 1.2 liters of treats in the main pouch, which closes via overlapping neoprene flaps for quick access. There’s a separate zippered compartment for storage as well as a front net pocket. On one side is a smaller compartment for waste bags with a dispenser opening.

    This can be worn with the included belt or secured to your clothing with the clip, if you prefer. If you’d rather have something that closes completely, they offer a smaller standard style pouch, as well.

  3. 3. EzyDog SnakPak Wearable Dog Treat Bag

    Pros:
    • Pull-up interior liner can be wiped clean easily
    • Dual belt clips for better stability
    • Reflective
    Cons:
    • No pick-up back dispenser
    • On the small side
    • Somewhat pricey

    The differentiator here is that you can pull up the interior lining and easily wipe it clean after use. There are also two belt clips to securely fasten it and keep it from tipping. For another magnetic-closure option, consider this model from EzyDog. It’s similar to other options on this list, offering a belt clip or strap attachment and a zippered accessory pocket. 

    It’s on the small side, with a capacity of 22 ounces of treats, but is unlikely to fit a smartphone, if that’s an important feature. The trim and pattern on the side are both highly reflective for good low-light visibility. Comes in your choice of red, black, blue, or orange. For runners, EzyDog also makes a slim option called SnakPak Go.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Magnetic
    • Attachment style: Strap or belt clip
    • Size: 6.5 inches by 3.2 inches by 5.5 inches
  4. 4. Doggone Good Rapid Rewards Pouch

    Pros:
    • Multiple pockets and functions, including pick-up bag dispenser
    • Convenient magnetic closure
    • Multiple color options
    Cons:
    • Interior jackpot pouch is somewhat difficult to access quickly
    • No metal hinge to hold it open
    • Some find that the magnet loses its power over time due to build-up

    This is quite a robust pouch in terms of durability, and the magnetic closure shuts with a reassuring snap. In addition to the Ruffwear pouch above, my wife and I use one of these for training our three mutts. The flip side is that there isn’t a mechanism by which to keep the bag open, but we never found this to be much of a hindrance.

    The main pocket also conceals a so-called “jackpot pocket”, which is closed with Velcro separately from the main section. Use this for high value treats that can draw your dog’s attention better than normal morsels.

    You also get a pick-up bag dispenser on one side, a zippered back compartment, and another accessory pouch. Attach it using the included waist belt or belt clip. We’ve been pretty cruel to ours for the last couple of years and it shows no signs of giving up. To top it off, you can choose among the following colors: purple, blue, black, green, red, orange, teal, or pink.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Magnetic
    • Attachment style: Strap or belt clip
    • Size: 8.9 inches by 7.3 inches by 2 inches
  5. 5. Kurgo Go Stuff It Dog Treat Bag

    Pros:
    • Carabiner attachment clips to almost anything
    • Reflective material improves visibility
    • Easily cleaned
    Cons:
    • No integrated pick-up bag dispenser (the pocket will work for this)
    • Odd price discrepancy between colors at the time of this writing
    • Some don't prefer the drawstring closure

    This option is differentiated from the one above thanks to the use of reflective materials throughout the construction. It’s just a little touch that adds visibility when walking your dog at night. The wide opening on this is maintained even when the drawstring within is cinched closed, making it easy to operate with one hand.

    While you could buy a carabiner and snap it on the D ring of the Mountain Made, Kurgo includes one in this package, and it’s arguably the superior attachment mechanism, since it will work with leashes and bags, as well. There’s a zippered pocket on the back for accessories or pick-up bags, as well as a belt clip, if you prefer. Comes in your choice of Coastal Blue or Chili Red.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Drawstring
    • Attachment style: Carabiner or belt clip
    • Size: 5 inches by 3 inches by 7.5 inches
  6. 6. FidosFavs Dog Walking/Training Pouch Bundle

    Pros:
    • Modular system allows for flexible use
    • Includes water bottle holder
    • Bundle includes all the essentials for training
    Cons:
    • Not quite as well built as other options
    • Accessories on the cheap side
    • Other storage slightly limited

    This option provides something none of the others do: a holder for a dog water bottle. With the inclusion of the collapsible bowl in this bundle, this means you can go for extended training sessions and still ensure your dog is hydrated.

    The entire system includes multiple modular pieces. In addition to the water bottle holder, this includes two different treat compartment inserts: one is standard height and zippered and one is two inches taller with a drawstring. This allows both for easy cleaning and for tailoring to your preferred use. You also get both a waist and shoulder strap, though both the bottle holder and treat pouch have belt clips if you want to wear them directly, as well.

    The bundle also includes a training clicker as an added bonus. There is a waste bag dispenser, though other storage is relatively flat, so it may only work for a phone.

    There are two other pouches like this available, but neither of them are as good as this offering: Eduplink and PetBemo.

  7. 7. Leashboss PackUp Pouch Dog Treat Training Waist Belt

    Pros:
    • Secure and streamlined design better for runners
    • Four different compartments
    • Waste bag dispenser
    Cons:
    • Smaller than advetised - you'll have to make choices in what you carry
    • Belt not removable
    • Fanny pack style not for everyone

    Similar to the EzyDog SnakPak Go, but less expensive, this Leash Boss option has runners in mind with this low-profile design. It’s a permanently-affixed belt with secure stitching while other treat bags may not be able to put up with the abuse of running.

    There are a total of four compartments in which to store items: a back slot for phones, a waste bag dispenser, a zippered main pocket and a net for smaller items. This also comes with two washable drawstring bags that you can use to cover something – a slobbery ball, for example – after your outing to protect the main bag from getting dirty.

    It’s smaller than other options, for sure, but if you just want to reward your dog while on a run, it could be a superior option. If you want a standard pouch, Leash Boss offers one of those, as well. They also sell long training leashes that are great for recall practice.

  8. 8. Starmark Triple Crown Pro Training Treat Pouch

    Pros:
    • Easy access neoprene top
    • Great size
    • Durable
    Cons:
    • Belt can't be removed
    • Somewhat difficult to fill
    • Only two compartments

    If you’re looking for a good all-around option, this model combines the easy-entry neoprene top with a size and shape that is conducive to reaching your hand in without being overly large.

    This is a simple unit comprising the main treat compartment and a zippered front pouch. It’s quite sturdy and well-built, but offers no additional features found in other options.

    Starmark makes a range of excellent training tools including their Pro-Training collar we included on our best dog training collars list and Triple Crown Pro Training Quicker Clicker.

  9. 9. Max & Molly Dog Treat Training Waist Bag

    Pros:
    • Not immediately recognizable as a treat pouch
    • Waste bag dispenser
    • Three color options
    Cons:
    • Only two compartments
    • Treats and other items go in the same pocket
    • Not as low-profile as other options

    Another fanny pack-style offering, this one looks quite a bit less obviously like a treat bag, which may be a benefit for some. Of course, if you use the waste bag dispenser as intended, it’s a bit of a giveaway, but still, the look is a bit nicer than some of the others.

    This is a simple affair with two compartments: the main zippered pouch and the dispenser pouch. This means everything has to go together if you want to bring items other than treats, but it should be large enough for most things, and there’s a key strap inside, as well. The belt is adjustable up to 54 inches as needed.

    This is available in blue, pink, or grey. They also have a basic traditional pouch available in the same colors, as well.

  10. 10. Mountain Made Dog Treat Pouch

    Pros:
    • Integrated pick-up bag dispenser
    • Two zippered accessory pockets
    • Matching leash available
    Cons:
    • Only available in one color
    • No clip-style attachment
    • Some don't prefer the drawstring closure

    Using a more conventional shape, this treat bag certainly looks the part for trail-going dogs. Every owner will find something to love about it, since it has two zippered accessory pockets and a pick-up bag dispenser in addition to the large main section. It also has four D rings that can be used either for orienting the included strap for waist or shoulder use, or for attaching other dog-related items.

    This uses a drawstring-style enclosure, which is fairly common. They throw in a roll of pick-up bags to use with the dispenser. Mountain Made also makes a matching leash, if you want the set.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Drawstring
    • Attachment style: Waist or shoulder strap
    • Size: 7 inches by 5 inches by 2 inches
  11. 11. Paw Lifestyles Dog Treat Training Pouch

    Pros:
    • Very versatile with multiple pockets and D rings
    • Can be worn three ways for different activities
    • Integrated pick-up bag dispenser
    Cons:
    • Does not ship with pick-up bags
    • May be overly large for some
    • Some don't prefer drawstring closure

    If you’re looking for the Swiss army knife of dog treat pouches, this might just be it. What is sacrifices in aesthetics it more than makes up for in function. First, of course is the large treat pocket, which uses the common drawstring closure. There are two zippered pouches; one along the front horizontally oriented and one on the back that is vertically oriented.

    There’s also a mesh pouch at the very front for quick-access storage. On the sides are two D rings for use with the included strap that can be used over the shoulder or around the waist, but also for holding clickers or keys. On the back, you get a sturdy metal belt clips and two belt loops, as well as a pick-up back dispenser.

    It’s not much to look at and doesn’t come in other colors, but should be all you need for a trip to the dog park. A similar option is also available from Mighty Paw, and is a few dollars cheaper with the subtraction of a couple of features.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Drawstring
    • Attachment style: Shoulder strap, waist strap, or belt clip
    • Size: 7 inches by 2.5 inches by 5 inches

    We’ll give an honorable mention to the Dexas Popware for Pets Pooch Pouch. It has a novel design and the silicone construction means it’s easy to clean. It’s a bit on the bulky side, though, and reviews indicate that the clip doesn’t manage the bulk of the unit super-well. Still could be worth considering.

    As for what to put in your pouch once it arrives, I strongly recommend the Nulo Freestyle Trainers. My dogs absolutely love them. The salmon ones smell the strongest, so they will likely make for the best option to pull attention back to the task at hand.

  12. 12. PetSafe Treat Pouch Sport

    Pros:
    • Multiple pockets and attachment points
    • Divided main pocket for multiple treat types
    • Hinge style pocket
    Cons:
    • May be overly large for some
    • Some quality control issues with the hinge closure
    • No pick-up bag dispenser

    The main internal pocket is divided into two sections so you can pack two different treats. This is ideal in case you’re training two dogs or want to prime actions with different rewards. This option from PetSafe takes a different approach for all the classic elements of a treat pouch. The closure mechanism is a hinged frame that can be popped open or closed with one hand. 

    There’s a large exterior accessory pocket, as well as a carabiner and an additional loop for attaching things like clickers, keys, whistles and more. The water resistant fabric is machine washable and comes in black and silver, red and silver, or blue and silver colorways. It’s quite large, so it will easily accommodate virtually all hands and a significant amount of treats, but the large size may be too bulky for some.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Hinge
    • Attachment style: Strap or belt clip
    • Size: 7.5 inches by 6.5 inches by 1 inch
  13. 13. Canine Hardware Treat Tote

    Pros:
    • Simple and inexpensive
    • Available in two sizes
    • Your choice of color
    Cons:
    • No additional pockets
    • No pick-up bag dispenser
    • Some don't prefer the drawstring closure

    Unlike some of the other options on this list, this model comes in two different sizes: small holds one cup of treats, while large holds two cups. If you’re looking for something simple, this option removes all other features outside of the simple drawstring treat pouch. You still get a rugged, canvas-like exterior and the closure can be operated one-handed. It attaches to belt, pocket, or bag with a simple clip and comes in black, red, or blue.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Drawstring
    • Attachment style: Belt clip
    • Size: 6 inches by 8 inches by 1 inch
  14. 14. Outward Hound Hands-Free Storage & Treat Tote

    Pros:
    • Simple and inexpensive
    • Large enough to hold a tennis ball
    • Belt clip
    Cons:
    • No additional pockets
    • Only one attachment option
    • Some don't prefer drawstring closure

    It’s fairly large, so you’ll be able to carry a large amount of treats, plus a tennis ball. Every dog owner knows that the ball gets pretty gnarly after a round of fetch at the park, so having some place to put that slobbery mess is handy. Taking after the Canine Hardware model, this option from Outward Hound keeps it simple while offering a unique use case. This is a simple, one-pocket pouch that attaches with a belt clip. 

    This is definitely a budget option, so the attachment clip isn’t the most robust. Still, with care this budget solution should more than be up to the job. If you want to upgrade somewhat, you could also consider this other option from Outward Hound, which is larger like the PetSafe model and includes other pockets.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Drawstring
    • Attachment style: Belt clip
    • Size: 5.5 inches by 4.5 inches by 4 inches
  15. 15. barkOutfitters Dog Treat Pouch

    Pros:
    • Large enough to fit a tennis ball and a small Kong toy at the same time
    • Accessory pocket
    • Durable
    Cons:
    • No additional closeable storage
    • Stiff top loop somewhat limits what it can be used for
    • Some don't prefer drawstring closure

    For a slightly nicer take on the Outward Hound pouch above, try this option. This is another large, simple treat carrier that has ample enough space for tennis balls or other toys. The real hallmark of this one is the excellent build quality; it’s well-stitched using tough materials, so it should last you a considerable amount of time.

    There is, of course, a trade off in functionality at this relatively low price, as the main pocket is augmented only by a simple mesh accessory pouch. Still, it’s quite a handsome item (available in blue or orange) that is more than capable of doing the job.

    Specs:

    • Closure style: Drawstring
    • Attachment style: Belt clip or loop
    • Size: 6.5 inches by 6 inches by 1 inch

Why Use a Dog Training Treat Pouch?

As we discussed in our best dog training treats post, these tasty morsels form the primary basis of positive reinforcement training. The idea, as you can probably guess, is to keep a stash of treats on hand to reward your dog either for following a command or for behaving properly. The real key is to make the treat — and by extension, the interaction with you — the main component of the training, regardless of where you are.

For example, if you only work with your dog in a specific room of your house, your dog may only retain that context in that environment. Once you go somewhere with new smells and sounds, your dog might be much less inclined to heed your commands. When training, you want to reinforce the lines of communication everywhere you go, and the easiest way to do that is to combine treats, pets, and firm but friendly tone of voice into each action.

It's true that you can train your dog without treats, but they confer other benefits beyond just something tasty your pup enjoys. The smell can help distract your dog from fixating on distractions and gives them something specific to focus on. They can be tossed or held in such a way that encourages your dog to complete a certain action, too. As someone with three dogs, I certainly recommend at least giving treats a whirl.

What Dog Treats Should I Use?

The short answer is: whatever your dog likes best. Training in various envrionments requires that your dog ignores outside input and focuses only on you, so you need to use a high-incentive treat to lure their attention. We recommend starting with traditional dog training treats or even normal dog treats because they're easy to buy in bulk and ready to go out of the package.

In addition to commercially-available dog training treats, you could also try cheese, cut up hot dogs, or whatever your dog likes to eat. Mind you, whatever you choose, you're going to need a lot of them. Positive reinforcement training requires a constant stream of command-and-reward.

While you could tote around a plastic container, or even the bag the treats come in. Both require two hands to operate, which won't work when trying to work with a rowdy young pup. In fact, my young husky mix requires two hands just to keep him from bolting toward whatever's caught his fancy at that moment. Purpose-made dog treat pouches are the best option.

See Also:

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