Juggalo March Photos: Pictures from the March on Washington

Getty

The Juggalo March on Washington is today. The event began at 2 p.m. Eastern at the Lincoln Memorial. Starting at 4 p.m., they planned to march to the Washington Monument and back, which would take them in the vicinity of the MOAR rally.

Here are photos from the event today, to see what happened.

GettyFans of the US rap group Insane Clown Posse, known as Juggalos, protest on September 16, 2017.

The event was going to last until 10 p.m. Eastern, when the Insane Clown Posse performed.

GettyPeople gather for a rally during the Juggalo March.

Juggalos are fans of the Insane Clown Posse, a rap group that refers to itself as “the most hated band in the world.” The term Juggalo comes from a 1992 ICP song called “The Juggla.”

GettyPeople gather for a rally during the Juggalo March.

In 2011, the Juggalos were branded members of a street gang. According to TaskAndPurpose, members were “surveilled, harassed, mocked, and subjected to wholesale discrimination.” In 2011, the FBI released a National Gang Threat Assessment Report, and classified Juggalos as a “loosely organized hybrid gang.” This was on the basis of several Juggalos committing crimes.

GettyThe Juggalo March

Juggalos argue that there the crimes cited by the FBI were random and not Juggalo-organized. Just like in any large group, some members have committed violence that isn’t approved by the group and isn’t associated with the group. In fact, the band sued the FBI and the Department of Justice over the label in 2014 (the suit was filed by the ACLU on the band’s behalf.) A judge dismissed the case, but an appeals court reinstated the case in 2015.

GettyFans of the US rap group Insane Clown Posse, known as Juggalos, protest on September 16, 2017.

Now the Juggalos march to show they’re not OK with the gang label or any kind of discrimination.

GettyA number of masked demonstrators stand in support of fans of the US rap group Insane Clown Posse, known as Juggalos, who are gathering on September 16, 2017 in front of the Lincoln Memorial.

Jason Webber, an organizer, told the Washington Post that 3,000 people were planning to attend the rally.

GettyFans of the US rap group Insane Clown Posse, known as Juggalos, gather on September 16, 2017.

GettyFans of the US rap group Insane Clown Posse, known as Juggalos, protest on September 16, 2017 in front of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. against a 2011 FBI decision to classify their movement as a gang.

GettyOne protester holds a “Clown Lives Matter” sign.

GettyThe Juggalo March

GettyThe Juggalo March

GettyA masked fan of the US rap group Insane Clown Posse, known as Juggalos, holds placards and dresses like Trump.

GettyThe Juggalo March

GettyThe Juggalo March

GettyA large crowd gathers for the Juggalo March.

GettyZach Vance, from Utah County, Utah, poses for a photo in front of the Lincoln Memorial, before the start of the Juggalo March.

GettyPeople gather for a rally before the start of the Juggalo March.

4 Comments

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4 Comments

cka2nd

“Where are the clowns? Don’t bother…I’m here.”

I love it! A Juggalo referencing the song “Send In the Clowns” by Stephen Sondheim (“Don’t bother…they’re here.”). Although the song was most famously a pop radio hit for folk singer Judy Collins, it’s from the 1973 Broadway musical “A Little Night Music,” which was in turn based on one of the rare comedies made by famous Swedish film director Ingmar Bergman, “Smiles of a Summer Night.” Classy!

josephmax

A point of order: the photo of the Great Lakes antics group was not in opposition to the Juggalos, they were in solidarity with them. “Whoop whoop” is a Juggalo chant. They have the Juggalo hatchet man chasing a swaistika with a red slash through it. They’re celebrating the Juggalos, not opposing them.

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