WATCH: Lake Fire Spawns Firenado in California [Fire Tornado Videos]

Firenado Lake Fire

Twitter/Angeles_NF A photo of the Lake Fire.

The Lake Fire in California spawned a fire tornado on August 12 while the blaze grew to more than 10,000 acres in size. You can see videos of the firenado and learn more below.


The Lake Fire Spawned an Impressive Firenado

This video below was shared by Bill Melugin of Fox Los Angeles. He wrote on Twitter: “Fire tornado. Insane winds just picked up. Mass evacuations everyone is getting out of here.”

In the video, you can see winds picking up, helping the fire grow, along with a fire tornado emerging from the blaze.

Veronica Miracle of ABC 7 also recorded a video of the firenado, which you can see in the second embedded video below. She wrote: “I have never seen anything like this. The #LakeFire is moving fast toward Lake Hughes. It created a fire tornado on this hill and it’s sucking everything inside.”

She tweeted that you could hear the roar of the flames coming near where they were reporting on the fire. She then shared this video with a closeup of the fire tornado, which is the second video in the tweets below. She wrote: “Shows the power of the #LakeFire. It is moving fast down Pine Canyon Road toward Lake Hughes.” 

 

The Lake Fire has already grown to 10,000 acres in size, Los Angeles Daily News reported. The fire started in the Lake Hughes region around 3:30 p.m. and exploded in size. In just a few hours it was 10,000 acres already and 0% contained. About 150 homes were part of a mandatory evacuation for Lake Hughes residents.

LA County Sheriff’s Department warned that the fire had crossed Pine Canyon Road and was moving northeasterly, so additional evacuations had to be put into place.

The fire can be seen in Los Angeles County and in Venice Beach. Nearby brush is helping to fuel the fire’s growth. Teams will be working on the fire throughout the night.


Many Fire Tornados Have Been Caught on Video Over the Years

The Carr Fire in 2018 also created a fire tornado.

The Carr Fire’s fire tornado was spawned on July 26, 2018, Science News for Students shared.

A fire in California in 2014 also had a reported firenado.

A firenado was also reported in 2003 after a Jim Beam factory was struck by lightning. To create the firenado, the Jim Beam factory was first struck by lightning and spilled 800,00 gallons of bourbon into a nearby lake, WCPO reported.

UCSB Geography reported that a fire tornado is created when a fire “acquires a vertical vorticity and forms a whirl, or a tornado-like vertically oriented rotating column of air.” Fire tornadoes are typically created by wildfires when a warm updraft converges with a wildfire. They can be a few meters wide and 10 to 50 meters tall, and typically only last for a few minutes. But some can contain very strong winds and in rare occasions, last as long as 20 minutes.

WeatherNation reported that these are sometimes created when turbulent winds combine with rising heat and fire. A firenado video, posted below, happened in Idaho.

Idaho Wildfire Belches out Frightening 'Firenado'A 'firenado' also known as a fire whirl, fire devil, fire tornado or fire twister is a whirlwind induced by a fire and often made up of flame or ash. They usually occur when intense rising heat and turbulent wind conditions combine to form whirling eddies of air. http://www.WeatherNationTV.com – Craig Fluer/Instagram © 2015 WeatherNation2015-08-18T22:31:54Z

ABC News reported on the firenado below, which was caught on video in the Australian outback.

Tornado Engulfed by Fire Caught on Tape | Good Morning America | ABC NewsA rare phenomenon that looks like a burning tornado is seen in amazing video. Swirling Inferno Caught on Tape After Flames Engulf Active Twister. SUBSCRIBE for the latest news and updates from ABC News ► http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=abcnews To read the full story and others, visit http://www.abcnews.com Watch more news stories from ABC News! More segments on…2012-09-18T14:21:06Z

ABC News explained that when ground level wind comes in contact with warm rising air, it can be propelled upward, creating a firenado. It is rare for these firenadoes to last longer than a few minutes.

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