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11 Best Cherry MX Blue Keyboards

cherry mx blue keyboard

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If you are an avid typist or a PC gamer, then the auditory click of a mechanical keyboard can help boost your speed and accuracy while typing. And there is no clicky switch more popular than the Cherry MX Blue. If you are ready to drive your roommates up the wall with some high-speed, high-feedback typing, then check out our picks for the best Cherry MX Blue keyboards available.

What Are the Best Cherry MX Blue Keyboards in 2023?

das mx blue keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Slim and durable
  • Authentic Cherry MX switches
  • 2 USB 3.0 ports
Price: $168.50 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
asus rog mx blue keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Custom RGB backlighting
  • USB pass-through port
  • Authentic Cherry MX switches
Price: $139.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
steelseries mx blue keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Custom RGB backlighting
  • OLED smart display
  • USB Passthrough
Price: $103.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
HyperX Alloy Origins RGB Mechanical Keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Durable PBT keycaps
  • Custom RGB backlighting
  • Full macro support
Price: $119.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
ikbc mx blue keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Double-shot PBT keycaps
  • Authentic Cherry MX switches
  • Dedicated volume keys
Price: $79.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
corsair cherry mx red Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Custom RGB backlighting
  • USB pass-through port
  • Detachable wrist rest
Price: $159.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
logtech k845 blue keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • White LED backlights
  • Clicky and tactile Blue switches
  • Multimedia shortcuts
Price: $79.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
acer mx blue keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Blue LED backlights
  • Clicky and tactile Blue switches
  • Multimedia shortcuts
Price: $105.93 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
drevo calibur mechanical keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Custom RGB backlighting
  • Authentic Cherry MX switches
  • Compact and durable design
Price: $64.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
logitech g pro mx blue keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Custom RGB backlighting
  • Durable and portable
  • USB passthrough
Price: $83.00 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Redragon K580 VATA mx blue keyboard Amazon Customer Reviews
  • Full RGB backlight
  • Dedicated multimedia + macro keys
  • Full macro support
Price: $64.99 Shop at Amazon Shop now Read our review
Our Unbiased Reviews
  1. 1. EDITOR’S CHOICE: Das Professional 4

    Pros:
    • Slim and durable
    • Authentic Cherry MX switches
    • 2 USB 3.0 ports
    • Dedicated multimedia controls
    Cons:
    • Not backlit
    • High price tag
    • No wrist rest

    The Das Professional 4 Mechanical Keyboard is a high-end mechanical keyboard that offers all the bells and whistles you’d expect from a gaming keyboard, albeit in a more professional package.

    This full-size 104-key keyboard offers clicky and tactile typing to those trying to boost their WPM or APM. The keycaps are laser-etched and can withstand plenty of abuse. The anodized aluminum top panel is under an inch thick, which is considerably thin by mech keyboard standards. It is still plenty durable.

    One downside of the professional look of this keyboard is that it forgoes LED backlighting, which can make this keyboard slightly hard to use at night. However, considering that Das makes several keyboards with completely blank keycaps, this company expects you to know your way around the home row.

    This flaw is easy to overlook when you consider the major benefits that the Das Pro 4 offers. This keyboard has two USB 3.0 ports next to its built-in six-foot USB cable. These can be used to plug in peripherals like a mouse and a microphone. It also has dedicated multimedia controls with an oversized volume knob.

    Possibly the most outlandish feature is the keyboard’s detachable magnetic footbar, which also serves as a ruler if you are pro gamer enough to have to measure out the distance between your peripherals.

    The Das Pro 4 might not be flashy but it will still be the most important device you’ll plug into your PC. Das also makes one of my favorite keyboards with MX Brown keys.


    VideoVideo related to editor’s choice: das professional 42019-06-07T19:20:25-04:00
  2. 2. Asus ROG Strix Flare

    Pros:
    • Custom RGB backlighting
    • USB pass-through port
    • Authentic Cherry MX switches
    • Detachable wrist rest
    • Dedicated multimedia controls
    Cons:
    • Large desk footprint
    • So-so keycaps
    • High price tag

    The Asus ROG Strix Flare is the perfect keyboard for serious gamers, especially if they want their gear to stand out as much as their skills. This gaming keyboard packs fully customizable RGB LEDs behind each keycap and some sickeningly cool underglow – and it is all compatible with Asus Aura Sync to match your other peripherals.

    The Strix Flare uses a full-size layout including a number pad. This gives it a commanding presence on any desk. You also get a set of dedicated multimedia controls above the function row, which includes (non-mechanical) buttons to control video playback, adjust LED brightness, and disable the Win key. There is also a volume scrollbar.

    The name-brand Cherry MX Red switches feel great on this board, providing quick and responsive linear activation. I do wish the Strix Flare came with PBT keycaps instead of the included ABS ones but this is to be expected at this entry-level price point. But just because this is an “entry-level” mech keyboard doesn’t mean that it falls short on extra features.

    The Strix Flare supports on-the-fly macro recording and comes with a detachable wrist rest for added ergonomics. It also has a pass-through USB port to connect other peripherals. Of course, you also get adjustable rear feet too. All in all, there is little else to ask for out of the Strix Flare. It simply checks all the boxes.

    This keyboard is also available with Cherry MX Brown switches, which have a tactile bump that makes them better for touch typists.

  3. 3. SteelSeries Apex 7

    Pros:
    • Custom RGB backlighting
    • OLED smart display
    • USB Passthrough
    • Detachable wrist rest
    Cons:
    • Large footprint
    • Thin ABS keycaps
    • High price tag

    The SteelSeries Apex 7 is a feature-packed mechanical keyboard that offers everything you might want from a premium keyboard. Between the custom RGB lighting, the 104-key layout, and the SteelSeries Blue gaming switches, there is little else to ask for.

    The board has a nice ergonomic curve to it and the RGB lights look great on the floating keys. It has multimedia shortcuts on the Function keys and supports macros via the SteelSeries Engine 3 software. The build quality is great too, featuring a detachable USB-C cable and an aluminum alloy frame.

    However, the extra features are where the Apex 7 really raises the bar. This board has a built-in OLED smart display to help track settings and provide notifications. It also has a clickable metal roller and media key to change settings on the fly. And to top things off it comes with a full-palm magnetic wrist rest. If you are looking for a full-size mechanical keyboard with all the bells and whistles, there is little to dislike about the Apex 7.

  4. 4. HyperX Alloy Origins RGB

    Pros:
    • Durable PBT keycaps
    • Custom RGB backlighting
    • Full macro support
    • Media keyboard shortcuts
    Cons:
    • Large desk footprint
    • No wrist rest
    • High price tag

    The HyperX Alloy Origins Mechanical Keyboard is a feature-packed gaming keyboard that allows for endless customization with its RGB light array and full macro functionality.

    In true gamer fashion, each switch on the Alloy Origins keyboard has its own RGB LED, and you can use the free NGenuity software to customize the board’s appearance key by key. More realistically, you’ll probably just settle on one of the preset LED light patterns, which make for an attractive visual effect.

    The keys are made with PBT plastic, which are more durable than other keycaps while also sporting a nice, grippy texture. All keys have HyperX Blue switches underneath them. So while these aren’t official Cherry MX switches, they have very similar specs. They have an actuation force of 50 grams, a 1.8-millimeter travel distance, and a lifespan of 80 million clicks.

    The metal frame beneath is incredibly sturdy with almost no flex. This full size takes up a lot of desk space but HyperX also makes a tenkeyless version of this keyboard as well if you don’t need the number pad. Both versions come with a nice detachable braided USB-C cable.

    With all of the awesome features that this keyboard packs, the main stopping it from being an instant pick for the best Cherry MX Blue Keyboard is its higher price, which only hardcore gamers will be interested in paying. That said, if you do as much typing as I do, this is a worthwhile purchase even if you never boot up a game using it.

    HyperX also makes some of the best aftermarket keycaps if you have an old keyboard that can be freshened up with some new keycaps.

  5. 5. iKBC CD108 v2

    Pros:
    • Double-shot PBT keycaps
    • Authentic Cherry MX switches
    • Dedicated volume keys and Win lock key
    Cons:
    • Not backlit
    • Stabilizer keys can be mushy
    • No multimedia controls

    With very few major players in the mechanical keyboard industry, newcomers iKBC have made waves with the budget-conscious functionality of their full-size iKBC CD108 v2. This keyboard has a fairly plain look out of the box, but you can spice up its all-black design with some optional colored keys (pictured above). The keys are not backlit.

    One of the nicest aspects of the iKBC CD108 v2 is its high-quality double-shot PBT keycaps, which are considerably more durable than standard ABS keycaps. They also have a 7° tilt for added ergonomics whether or not you use the foldout stands to further prop up the keyboard. The CD108 v2 has dedicated volume keys plus a Win lock key. Unfortunately, it does not have playback controls bound to it.

    The switches underneath are genuine Cherry MX Blues, which is awesome considering the price of this keyboard. They feel clicky and tactile as expected, though some users noted that the larger stabilizer keys (particularly the spacebar) were a little slower to return. 

    The CD108 v2’s base plate is durable matte plastic. It is sturdy enough to survive daily use but it doesn’t feel quite as rugged as the metal bases you get on pricier boards. The rest of this keyboard’s components feel nice, including its fold-out feet and attached USB cable. If you are looking for an affordable mechanical keyboard that will last you an incredibly long time, then this keyboard is a great pick.

    iKBC also makes one of my personal favorite keyboards with MX Red switches.

  6. 6. Corsair K70 RGB Mk.2

    Pros:
    • Custom RGB backlighting
    • USB pass-through port
    • Detachable wrist rest
    • Dedicated multimedia controls
    Cons:
    • Lots of light bleed
    • Large desk footprint
    • So-so keycaps

    Simply put, Corsair’s K70 RGB Mk.2 is one of the best Cherry MX Blue keyboards out there. It sports a lot of the premium features of a high-end keyboard while not losing track of the most important aspect: a smooth typing experience.

    Its Blue switches, which offer that clicky and tactile feel that helps boost your typing speed while simultaneously annoying everyone around you with their loud plastic sound. This full-size keyboard has fairly decent keycaps but it also ships with some special grippy WASD keys that you can swap out if you regularly play FPS games. The spacebar also has this grippy design. The K70 RGB Mk.2 has a full suite of multimedia controls as well but they are just buttons, not mechanical keys. This includes a brightness button and a Win lock button.

    This keyboard has a fully customizable FGB LED backlight to illuminate its key legends for easier night-time use. You can cycle through some basic lighting patterns or customize a color-coded layout key-by-key using Corsair’s CUE software. Keep in mind you can still toggle between the three brightness settings without the software, so this keyboard can still be considered plug-and-play. This software can also be used to program macros for gaming or data entry.

    The anodized brushed aluminum frame feels great and has sturdy rubber feet to stay in place. This keyboard has a detachable wrist rest, which I recommend using for long-term wrist health, even if ergonomic features like this can sometimes be uncomfortable. The only real downside is that it adds to this keyboard’s already large desk footprint.

    All in all, the pros far outweigh the cons of this keyboard, making the K70 RGB Mk.2 an easy recommendation for anyone who likes Cherry MX Blue switches.

  7. 7. Logitech K845ch

    Pros:
    • White LED backlights
    • Clicky and tactile Blue switches
    • Multimedia shortcuts
    Cons:
    • So-so keycaps
    • Attached USB cable
    • No wrist rest

    If you are after a keyboard with genuine Cherry MX switches, then you should be careful about buying Logitech keyboards. Many of their keyboards of the last few years have used proprietary Romer-G clone switches, but in 2020 they released a new line of Cherry MX keyboards due to fan demand. This included the Logitech K845ch.

    But unlike their Logitech G line of gaming gear, the K845ch is performance first and aesthetics second (which is how I like it). The plain grey design keeps the focus on the Cherry MX Blue switches, which provide both tactile and auditory feedback for fast-paced typists who don’t want to miss a single keystroke. The island-style keys are great for keeping your keyboard clean, as there is nowhere for crumbs and dust to hide.

    The K845ch has a full 104-key layout, with multimedia shortcuts bound to the function row. It has a white LED backlight to illuminate its legends and you can even cycle through a handful of pre-coded light patterns if you want some dialed back gamer flair. But while these keycaps are well-suited to gaming, the K845ch doesn’t have onboard memory to store macro commands, which is a bummer considering that they have this feature on almost all of their gaming keyboards.

    Another difference between the K845ch and the Logitech G line is that this keyboard has an attached USB charge cable rather than a detachable one. This is a small nitpick but, hey, it’s my job to be picky. The rest of the board is solidly built, with a sturdy aluminum frame that will stand up to the most aggressive keyboard mashing.

  8. 8. Acer Predator Aethon 300

    Pros:
    • Blue LED backlights
    • Clicky and tactile Blue switches
    • Multimedia shortcuts
    Cons:
    • Attached USB cable
    • No wrist rest
    • So-so key caps

    The Acer Predator Aethon 300 is a highly capable gaming keyboard that provides useful features like LED backlighting and n-key rollover without coming off as too over the top. The only thing that might irk a non-gamer is the color-coded WASD keys, which are meant to easily orient your left hand when playing first-person shooters.

    That said, you won’t necessarily want to use this keyboard in a crowded workspace, namely because its Cherry MX Blue switches are unapologetically clicky. Of course, they are designed that way so that you can use the auditory and tactile feedback to ensure every button press has been completed. Typing on the Aethon 300 is a great experience, even though the ABS keycaps feel kind of thin.

    The board base itself is incredibly sturdy, though. It is made with solid aluminum so it has a decent heft and will stay entirely put thanks to its height-adjustable rubber feet. I do wish the USB cable was detachable, but considering the price at which Acer offers this premium hardware, you won’t hear me complaining all that much.

  9. 9. Drevo Calibur V2 TE 60% Keyboard

    Pros:
    • Custom RGB backlighting
    • Authentic Cherry MX switches
    • Compact and durable design
    Cons:
    • Squeaky stabilizer keys
    • Finicky software
    • Thin ABS keycaps

    If you only have limited desktop space for peripherals, then you may be interested in a “60%” keyboard like the Drevo Calibur V2 TE, which takes up roughly 60 percent of the space of a full-size keyboard. Its 71-key design is still highly functional, though, especially when backed by a solid set of switches and keycaps.

    This version of the Calibur V2 comes with legit Cherry MX Blue switches though you can get this same keyboard with Otemu Blue switches—a comparable budget option. The keycaps are made from standard ABS but they can be upgraded down the road if the lettering ever starts to wear. The board is backlit by individual RGB LEDs under each key, and they can be customized with the DPC software. The keyboard also has a separate RGB side lighting system.

    The board itself is fairly sturdy and comes with magnetic feet to adjust your typing angle. The keyboard also has a detachable USB-C cable. It does not include a wrist rest or media keys, though (it does, however, have media shortcuts). Ultimately, the form factor is the most appealing thing about this keyboard, though, so definitely consider it if you have limited desk space but don’t want to compromise your keyboard’s performance.

  10. 10. Logitech G PRO

    Pros:
    • Custom RGB backlighting
    • Durable and portable
    • USB passthrough
    Cons:
    • No wrist rest
    • Micro USB connection
    • Thin ABS keycaps

    Though most older Logitech keyboards use Cherry MX switches, the Logitech G PRO Keyboard comes after their switch to their house-made GX switches. So how does this new design stack up against a classic like the K845ch? Pretty well, it turns out.

    This tenkeyless keyboard is an upgrade for the aesthetic and functional elements and its new switch type is remarkably similar to the original MX Blues. They have an actuation force of 60 g and a travel distance of 1.9 mm from resting to their clicky point. In other words, they are fairly similar. The RGB lighting has some great support too, as it can connect with other LightSync devices. You can program macros using the G HUB software too.

    And the build quality is quite nice as well. The board is slim and sturdy with a USB passthrough port and a detachable cable. The cable is oddly still MicroUSB but at least it is braided. There are no multimedia keys on this compact frame but you can still use media shortcuts.

  11. 11. Redragon K580 VATA RGB

    Pros:
    • Full RGB backlight
    • Dedicated multimedia + macro keys
    • Full macro support
    Cons:
    • Lighting is not fully customizable
    • Hardwired cable
    • Thin ABS keycaps

    The Redragon K580 VATA RGB proves that you don’t have to spend a lot of money to get a legit mechanical keyboard. This budget keyboard is available with either both Otemu MX Blue and MX Brown keys, both of which are nearly identical to name-brand switches from Cherry. That means a high-end mechanical keyboard at a lower price.

    The K580 BATA sports not only a 104-key design with N-key rollover but also (non-mechanical) dedicated macro buttons and dedicated multimedia buttons across the top of the board. It has RGB lighting under each key but only offers a limited selection of lighting cycles rather than full customization. The board also has RGB edge lighting, but this is controlled separately from the mainboard LEDs.

    The construction of the board is fairly decent too. As previously mentioned, the switches perform quite well despite being knock-offs. The keycaps are on the thinner side but can ultimately be swapped if you don’t love them. The board has a hardwired USB cable, which is a bummer. But any shortcomings are easy to overlook, as the K580 VATA still wins my heart with its pure price-to-performance ratio.

    Want to browse more keyboards in this price range with a wider variety of switch types. You can browse my favorite budget mechanical keyboards.

Why Does Everyone Love Cherry Blue Switches?

Unless you're lucky enough to own a vintage IBM Model M keyboard in good condition, Cherry MX brand switches represent the gold standard for gamers and typists alike.

And now that every switch manufacturer from Kailh, to Otemu, to Gateron, to Razer, to Logitech makes a Blue-style switch, you might be wondering exactly what makes the Cherry MX Blues so popular.

First of all, Cherry MX Blues are the clickiest of the tactile switch types, which makes them the go-to choice for those who rely on auditory feedback to type accurately. They are specially designed to add a clicky sound to each keystroke at the point of actuation.

Their point of actuation is at 2.2 mm and they travel a full 4 mm per stroke. Each switch requires 50g of actuation force. This guide from The Keyboard Company goes further into depth on the differences between switch types.

Is Cherry the Best Keyboard Switch Brand?

Since there are so many brands that seek to imitate the success of the original Cherry switch designs, this question comes up a lot. But it is a highly subjective question.

Most copycat versions of the MX Blues have slightly different actuation forces and travel distances, which some users may prefer. Most users, however, probably won't even notice a millimeter or two of extra travel distance, at least not the way they would notice the difference between a linear and a tactile switch.

Personally, though, I have tried all of the major switch types and Cherry MX switches are my go-to brand. They've been around the longest by a wide margin, which absolutely says something in the fast-paced world of tech.

Plus, if I am going to a LAN cafe or another open PC event, I'll have experience with one of the most popular keyboard types. Gamers like me have come to expect a very specific feel from their keyboards and Cherry always delivers.