Stefan Passantino: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

MLA Political Law Partner Stefan Passantino Discusses Political Ads on KUSI News2012-10-22T19:20:46.000Z

Stefan Passantino serves as deputy counsel to President Donald Trump, and he advises the president on ethics issues. Passantino’s name is in the news this week because of his involvement in the case of Kellyanne Conway, who last month plugged Ivanka Trump’s merchandise on Fox News.

Passantino was hired to the Trump administration at the end of January, a few days after the inauguration. Unlike many members of the Trump administration, Passantino had no role in the presidential campaign.

Here’s what you need to know about Stefan Passantino, deputy counsel to the president.


1. He is a Former Partner of the Law Firm Dentons

Stefan Passantino Discusses Potential Future Adoption of Voter Registration Like Oregon'sMcKenna Long & Aldridge attorney Stefan Passantino joins LXBN TV to discuss Oregon's decision to automatically register voters using information collected at the DMV. For more video interviews, visit http://www.lxbn.com2015-03-26T00:40:52.000Z

Before coming to the White House, Passantino worked in Washington, D.C. for the law firm Dentons.

According to My AJC, Passantino headed the political law division at Dentos, and he would advise clients on issues like campaign contribution rules and disclosure guidelines. Howard Dean, former governor of Vermont, is currently a senior advisor for Dentons, and Dean offered praise for Passantino when Passantino was brought onto the Trump administration.

“I have worked with Stefan (from the other side of the aisle) for eight years,” Dean said in a statement. “I have a lot of confidence that he will be clear about what the ethical and legal boundaries are in his advice to the White House, and I appreciate his willingness to serve the country.”


2. He Worked for Newt Gingrich During the 2012 Presidential Election

Newt Gingrich CPAC, former House Speaker, Newt Gingrich 2016

Newt Gingrich at CPAC 2015. (Getty)

Passantino has counseled a number of Republican politicians over the years including Newt Gingrich during Gingrich’s 2012 presidential campaign.

“No one understands the ethics process better than Stefan,” Gingrich said in a statement in January. “He will stand firm for an administration that is above reproach. President Trump could not have picked a better professional for this job.”

Newt Gingrich later joined Dentons, the law firm where Passantino was working as a partner. Gingrich was hired as a senior advisor on the political law team headed by Passantino.

According to Passantino’s profile on the Republican National Lawyers Association’s website, some of his other clients have been Dennis Hastert, Roy Blunt, Michael Steele, Bob Barr and JC Watts.


3. He Graduated From Emory University School of Law School

Will the Supreme Court Go Back on Citizens United? No, Almost Certainly Not—Stefan PassantinoMore LXBN TV interviews here: http://lxbn.lexblog.com/tag/lxbn-tv/ News that the Supreme Court is going to revisit their ultra-controversial opinion in Citizens United v. FEC has generated a significant amount of buzz this week, as many are wondering if the Court is second-guessing their decision that corporations' political contributions are protected under the First Amendment. As today's…2012-04-12T17:30:34.000Z

Passantino graduated in 1991 from Emory University School of Law, according to his LinkedIn page.

While at Emory, Passantino served as the managing editor of the Emory Law Journal.

After graduating from Emory, Passantino served as a clerk for United States District Court Judge Herbert F. Murray.


4. He Has Dealt With Cases of Pay-to-Play Compliance

STOCK Act Loses Much of Its Teeth, But Members of Congress Aim to Change That—Stefan PassantinoHey, remember the STOCK Act? The legislation intended to cut down on insider trading by members of Congress and prohibt the use of non-public information for private profit was recently signed into law—albeit quietly—as President Obama snuck it out on Tax Day. That may have had something to do with the fac that the Act…2013-05-02T19:45:15.000Z

According to a White House press release, one of Passantino’s areas of specialties is pay-to-play compliance. He has written a number of articles for Pay to Pay Law Blog.

This is something that will almost certainly come up during Donald Trump’s presidency, as there have already been some concerns about the possibility about pay-to-play in the White House considering Trump’s business has not been placed into a blind trust.

Most recently, Democrats expressed concern about Mar-a-Lago, Trump’s resort in Palm Beach, Florida where he has spent several weekends since becoming president. According to Talking Points Memo, Mar-a-Lago’s club initiation fee was recently raised from $100,000 to $200,000, and Democrats believe that this will create a situation in which the wealthy can pay to have access to the president.

“Your Winter White House will provide an audience with you for those who can afford it, not to mention an increasing cash-flow into your family-run organization,” Senate Democrats Sheldon Whitehouse and Tom Udall recently said in a letter. “Instead of draining the swamp, it appears you’re bringing Washington right to the swamps of Mar-a-Lago.”


5. He Says Kellyanne Conway Will Not be Disciplined for Telling Viewers to ‘Buy Ivanka’s Stuff’

Fox and Friends Kellyanne Conway commercial for Ivanka TrumpKellyanne Conway encourages Fox News viewers to buy Ivanka Trump's clothing and appears to violate federal law2017-02-09T14:53:46.000Z

During an interview with Fox News in early February, Kellyanne Conway violated an ethics rule by telling viewers to go out and buy Ivanka Trump’s merchandise; White House employees are permitted from endorsing products.

In a letter to Senate Democrats today, Passantino said that he has personally met with Kellyanne Conway and briefed her on ethics rules, but he says that she will not be disciplined for her statement.

“Upon completion of our inquiry, we concluded that Ms. Conway acted inadvertently and is highly unlikely to do so again,” he said. “It is noted that Ms. Conway made the statement in question in a light, off-hand manner while attempting to stand up for a person she believed had been unfairly treated and did so without nefarious motive or intent to benefit personally.”