Super Bowl 2016 Broadcasters: Who’s Calling the Game?


See inside the CBS truck at Super Bowl 50 in full 360-degree VRCBS Sports chairman Sean McManus gives us a one-minute, 360-degree tour of the Super Bowl production truck the day before the big game. To watch 360 degree videos, you'll need the latest version of Chrome, Opera, Firefox, or Internet Explorer on your computer. On mobile, use the latest version of the YouTube app for Android…2016-02-06T21:41:05Z

CBS has you covered from start to finish for Super Bowl 50 between the Denver Broncos and Carolina Panthers. The game kicks off at 6:30 p.m. ET tonight, but CBS will begin their pregame coverage at 2:00 p.m. ET.

Jim Nantz and Phil Simms will be calling the game with Tracy Wolfson joining them from the sideline. Nantz will be calling his fourth Super Bowl while Simms will be working his eighth as an analyst.

Here’s some background about tonight’s announcing team:


Phil Simms

Phil Simms, Super Bowl 50 announcers, CBS, Jim Nantz, who

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Simms offers the unique perspective of a former player as well as a veteran analyst. As quarterback of the New York Giants, he helped lead the team to two Super Bowl titles. Simms was the first overall selection by the Giants in the 1979 draft and was named an All-Pro in 1986.

“The thing that jumps out at me most was Bill Cowher telling us before the game that he’s going to do an onside kick. So, when he did the onside kick we had 9,000 angles of the onside kick. So, it was pretty cool,” Simms told Philly.com regarding some of his favorite memories of the Super Bowls he has called.

Simms has received strong criticism by fans and media members alike. “Fans deserve better. The game deserves better,” Dan Levy of Awful Announcing writes in regards to Simms calling Super Bowl 50. Levy’s critiques included his propensity to defend quarterbacks as well as stating obvious facts throughout the broadcast.

Nantz has come to the defense of his partner. “All I know is that he is a tremendous partner to work with. No one outworks him. I admire the effort he puts into it every time we do a game. It is as thorough as it gets. He watches more film, talks to more coaches and coordinators,” Nantz told Sports Illustrated when asked about the criticism of Simms announcing.


Jim Nantz

Jim Nantz, Super Bowl 2016 announcers, Super Bowl 50, Phil Simms, who, cbs

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Nantz is one of the most versatile broadcasters in the industry. According to Sports Illustrated, Nantz will have called Super Bowl 50, the 50th anniversary of the Master’s and the 50th edition of the Final Four.

He is well known by NFL and golf fans alike for his work with both sports. Nantz admitted to Sports Illustrated that the Super Bowl is by far the biggest event that he has done.

“But this [the Super Bowl] is the biggest one. This is America’s favorite sport, favorite event, it blows out everything else as far as interest and audience size,” Nantz said.

Nantz is widely respected for his work as a broadcaster and his trophy case reflects his esteem among peers. He has won Sportscaster of the Year five teams and has two Emmy awards.


Tracy Wolfson

Tracy Wolfson, Super Bowl 2016 broadcasters, Super Bowl 50, sideline reporter, Jim Nantz and Phil Simms, CBS

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Wolfson has been with CBS for 12 years. Like Nantz, she has covered a wide array of sporting events. In addition to her work with NFL games, she is also known for her coverage of college football and basketball. She previously covered a number of sports including tennis, auto racing and the NBA.

She spoke with Sports Illustrated about the preparation and magnitude of covering an event like the Super Bowl. “There is so much that goes into the week, whether it’s press conferences, media day, meetings or practice. You just put a lot more time in. Finally, it’s the biggest event and biggest TV audience I’ve ever been a part of. It’s the goal you have in mind when you are aspiring to be a broadcaster,” she said.

Wolfson is also the host of her own radio show called We Need to Talk.