Tennessee vs LSU Basketball Live Stream: How to Watch Online

UT vs LSU Basketball

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First place in the SEC is up for grabs on Saturday afternoon when No. 13 LSU welcomes No. 5 Tennessee to Baton Rouge.

The game is scheduled to start at Noon ET and will be televised on ESPN, but if you don’t have cable, you can watch a live stream of the game on your computer, phone or streaming device by signing up for one of the following cable-free, live-TV streaming services:

PlayStation Vue

PlayStation Vue–which doesn’t require an actual PlayStation console to sign up or watch–offers four different live-TV channel packages, all of which include ESPN.

You can start a free 5-day trial right here (select “Start Streaming” in the upper-right corner), and you can then watch a live stream of the game on your computer via the PS Vue website, or on your phone (Android and iPhone supported), tablet, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Chromecast, PlayStation (3 or 4), or other supported device via the PS Vue app.

If you can’t watch live, PlayStation Vue comes included with cloud DVR.

Hulu With Live TV

In addition to a Netflix-like on-demand streaming library, Hulu also offers a bundle of 50-plus live TV channels, including ESPN.

You can sign up for “Hulu with Live TV” right here, and you can then watch a live stream of the game on your computer via the Hulu website, or on your phone (Android and iPhone supported), tablet, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Echo Show, or other streaming device via the Hulu app.

If you can’t watch live, “Hulu with Live TV” also comes with 50 hours of Cloud DVR storage (with the ability to upgrade to “Enhanced Cloud DVR,” which gives you 200 hours of DVR space and the ability to fast forward through commercials).

Sling TV

ESPN is included in the “Sling Orange” channel bundle.

You can start a free seven-day trial right here, and you can then watch a live stream of the game on your computer via the Sling TV website, or on your phone (Android and iPhone supported), tablet, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, or other streaming device via the Sling TV app.

If you can’t watch live, you can get 50 hours of cloud DVR storage as an additional add-on.

Tennessee vs LSU Preview

After LSU’s 82-77 overtime defeat against Florida on Wednesday, this is no longer a matchup between the only teams with one loss in the SEC.

But it’s still a matchup for first place in the conference–if Tennessee wins, they’re alone at the top with some critical breathing room heading into a really difficult final stretch. If LSU wins, it’s a three-way tie along with Kentucky and Tennessee, but the Tigers will then own victories over both the Wildcats and Volunteers.

With such high stakes, both teams should be amped up for this one, but LSU will likely be especially desperate to get a win for the home crowd after disappointing them on Wednesday night.

“It’s embarrassing we’ve lost two home games,” LSU head coach Will Wade said after the loss. “We’re 7-0 in the SEC on the road and we’ve lost two (at home). I feel terrible for our fans. It’s hard on people to work and put their money to come watch us play. It’s sickening. Sickening. Absolutely sickening.”

It’s also a matchup between two of the most entertaining offenses in the country.

The Volunteers’ offense is built on patience and ball-movement, unsurprising for a team that is led by six upperclassmen. They can get out in transition if the opportunity presents itself, but they’re never in a hurry (155th in the country in adjusted tempo), they take care of the ball (24th in turnover percentage) and they are extremely unselfish, with 63.5 percent of their buckets being assisted (second highest rate behind only Michigan State).

The result? The second most efficient offense in college basketball, per Ken Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency rankings.

LSU, meanwhile, brings forth almost an exact opposite blueprint with five contributing underclassmen (one sophomore, four freshmen) who were all Top-100 recruits. With so much youthful, athletic talent, they are prone to mistakes (194 in the country in turnover percentage) and can’t shoot the three all that well (32.6 percent as a team), but they are highly dangerous in transition, they are relentless at attacking the hoop and they own the offensive glass (sixth in offensive rebounding percentage).

The Tigers may get it done in different ways than Tennessee, but they are equally effective, ranking 11th in Pomeroy’s adjusted offensive efficiency rankings.

Put it all together–first place on the line, important seeding ramifications for the Big Dance, and two of America’s most engrossing offenses–and you’ve got your Saturday afternoon plans taken care of.


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