Chicago Bulls’ Dennis Rodman Disappeared ‘Once A Week’ Reveals Teammate

CHICAGO, UNITED STATES: Michael Jordan (L) pats Dennis Rodman (R), both of the Chicago Bulls, after Rodman was called for a technical foul 03 May during the second half of their NBA eastern conference semi-finals game against the Charlotte Hornets at the United Center in Chicago, IL. The Bulls won the game 83-70 to lead the series 1-0. AFP PHOTO/JEFF HAYNES (Photo credit should read JEFF HAYNES/AFP/Getty Images)

The Last Dance, ESPN’s ten-part documentary series profiles the final season of the Chicago Bulls‘ dynasty and begins airing on Sunday April 19.

Today former Chicago Bulls guard, Scott Burrell appeared on the Scoop B Radio Podcast and dished on the Bulls dynamic.

Million Dollar Question: What were the 90s Bulls like?

Check out notes from our dialogue below:

Scott Burrell on Dennis Rodman:

“It was so competitive in practice. He would disappear once a week, I think. Once every couple days or week, so that was the only thing different about Dennis. But Dennis was such a great player. He watched so much film. He good care of his body. He lifted weights before games. I mean, he was so dedicated to being a great player. To watch him go to work, and not even look to score, but STILL dominate a game defensively and rebounding, it was AMAZING that someone could do that without trying to score. His knowledge of the game – his IQ was unbelievable.”

Scott Burrell on the modern-day Rodman:

“No one. Nobody. Scoring is everything to these guys. Dennis didn’t even want to score. So I would say there is really no one like that. And no one could go get 30 rebounds, or 25, rebounds or 20 rebounds every game. Well, it’s different now because they let guys get rebounds. You had to go get rebounds back then.”

9 Oct 1997: Forward Scott Burrell of the Chicago Bulls drives the ball down the court during a preseason game against the Atlanta Hawks at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois. The Hawks won the game 84-83.


On Rodman’s mind games and the genius behind it:

“Dennis used to always get under people’s skin. But it was a great tactic. He would get guys off their games, get them thinking – I remember what he did to Frank Brickowski. I wasn’t playing with the Bulls at the time, but I know what he did to Frank Brickowski against Seattle and got him thrown out the game a couple times. He was always the agitator, he was great at his craft, and he played mental games with a lot of people.”

Scott Burrell on synergy between Toni Kukoc and Scottie Pippen:

“They’re both great offensive players and they’re both unselfish. At Toni being 6’10” and Scottie being 6’8”-6’9” they are big, long scorers. They didn’t clash at all. They knew they needed each other to be great. I don’t think that there were any egos on the team back then. Everybody knew you better do your job, you better do it to the best of your ability, and that’s what made us win games. I just think Toni liked the offense better than defense, but that’s fine. His job was to score.”

Scott Burrell on Michael Jordan being underpaid and the biggest bargain in sports:

“One-hundred percent true. Michael Jordan was underpaid. Oh yeah. I mean back then, he WASN’T even one the highest paid on the Bulls until he signed those two big deals at the end of his career. The last two years he made about 36 Million I think. That’s average. That’s what guys make now.”

Scott Burrell on how he knew that this was going to be the last year Michael, Scottie and Dennis were going to be together:

“I think the front office and some of the players. It just got too much – I think guys didn’t get along from the front office to some of the players, Phil and some of the coaching staff… so little by little it was deteriorating and guys were getting older. So I think they knew it was going to be the last chance to be together and that’s why the media came in and filmed everything for this documentary – This Last Dance documentary.”