George Floyd Protests: New York Police Warn of Concrete That Looks Like Ice Cream

NYPD ice cream

Facebook The NYPD has issued a warning about coffee cups filled with cement masquerading as ice cream.

The New York Police Department issued an internal alert that containers of hardened concrete made to look like chocolate chip ice cream were found in the vicinity of George Floyd protests in Lower Manhattan.

The New York Post reported this week that “The cups, which have markings on the outside, also resemble concrete sample tests commonly used on construction sites.”

In part, the police alert reads: “The cups were filled with cement and made to look like CHOCOLATE CHIP ICE CREAM.”

Protests were sparked across the U.S. in response to the death of 46-year-old Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis. Former police officer Derek Chauvin placed his knee on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes in arrest footage that was seen around the world.

The cups were found on the window ledge of the Manhattan Supreme Court on June 3 after a demonstration in Lower Manhattan, the Daily Mail reported.

However, posters on Twitter were casting aspersions about the validity of the NYPD’s claims yesterday, with some saying the police had been duped.

One math teacher took to Twitter and said the items in question were clearly “Test samples for a construction site. They are in coffee cups not ice cream containers. The writing on the side is the composition of the mix.”

The posters also say the NYPD “Claim that Antifa disguised concrete as ice cream” but that the cups were in fact “Concrete-curing test cups to see how different mixes set up.”

Heavy contacted the NYPD for comment and clarification but has yet to receive a response.

Since the alert was issued, there have been no reports of the objects being used to harm police, but the NYPD was “Nevertheless ordered to be on guard for them.”


Previous Protests Have Turned Violent & Have Seen New York Police Sent to the Hospital

NYPD New York Protests

FacebookNYPD officers at New York protests.

New York Police Commissioner Dermot Shea had earlier reported concrete-filled tennis balls and water bottles being used against cops during demonstrations.

The New York Post reported that two police officers were pelted with tennis balls at a recent protest at Union Square, with one hospitalized for bruises on his left shoulder.

The paper reported that 292 cops had been hurt in New York protests, including Sergeant William Maher, who was “Struck by a car during looting in The Bronx.” Amongst those who turned on police and police property were “a Princeton-educated attorney” and a woman from upstate New York who threw objects, including Molotov cocktails, at squad cars.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio imposed a citywide curfew last week in a bid to curb lootings and vandalism.

Last Sunday, de Blasio said a third police officer would be disciplined after he was filmed on May 29 in a violent interaction with a protester.

An incident at a street protest in Buffalo, New York, saw an SUV drive into a group of police officers while a viral video shows two Buffalo police officers pushing a 75-year-old man to the ground.


Upper East Side Locals Happy – Mostly – to Hear the Sounds of Ice Cream Trucks

Nextdoor ice cream

Ice cream was causing a stir for other reasons on social media in New York this week, with residents on the Upper East Side posting that they were both irritated and relieved by the sounds of the ice cream truck in their neighborhood.

Some were concerned that the noise was disrupting their Zoom meetings, while others suggested calling City Council Member Keith Powers’ office or 311.

“It is 10:08 PM on Sunday night and that darn soft ice cream truck that has invaded our neighborhood is on the corner of 70th and 2nd blasting ‘Pop goes the weasel’ over and over. Is there nothing we can do to stop him? This is the fourth or fifth time tonight that he’s been out there, and it’s been going on for over a week. I am not a grump, but after 10 at night is just too much!” one wrote on Nextdoor.com.

Another author responded, “Somehow, I find it a welcome, light touch during these hard times. Beats sirens from ambulances.”

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