US Olympic Swimming Trials 2021 Live Stream: How to Watch Online

U.S. Olympic swimming trials watch

Getty Dana Vollmer

The U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials take place at CHI Health Center Arena in Omaha, Nebraska, with qualifying heats beginning June 13.

The qualifying heats and finals for each event will be televised on NBC Sports Network and NBC (full schedule) every day between June 13 and June 20.

But if you don’t have cable, here are some different ways you can watch a live stream of all the action at the 2021 US Olympic Swimming Trials:

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FuboTV

You can watch a live stream of NBC (live in most markets), NBC Sports Network and 100-plus other TV channels on FuboTV, which comes with a free seven-day trial:

FuboTV Free Trial

Once signed up for FuboTV, you can watch the 2021 US Olympic Swimming Trials live on the FuboTV app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV or Fire Stick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, Samsung Smart TV, Android TV, iPhone, Android phone, iPad or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the FuboTV website.

If you can’t watch live, FuboTV also comes with 250 hours of cloud DVR space.


AT&T TV

AT&T TV has four different channel packages: “Entertainment”, “Choice”, “Ultimate” and “Premier.” NBC (live in most markets) and NBC Sports Network are included in every one, but you can pick any package and any add-on you want with your free 14-day trial.

Note that the free trial isn’t advertised as such, but your “due today” amount will be $0 when signing up. If you watch on your computer, phone or tablet, you won’t be charged for 14 days. If you watch on a streaming device on your TV (Roku, Fire Stick, Apple TV, etc.), you will be charged for the first month, but you can get still get a full refund if you cancel before 14 days:

AT&T TV Free Trial

Once signed up for AT&T TV, you can watch the 2021 US Olympic Swimming Trials live on the AT&T TV app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV or Fire Stick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Samsung Smart TV, iPhone, Android phone, iPad or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the AT&T TV website.

If you can’t watch live, AT&T TV also comes with 20 hours of Cloud DVR storage (with the ability to upgrade to unlimited hours).


Sling TV

You can watch a live stream of NBC (live in select markets), NBC Sports Network and 40-plus other TV channels via Sling TV’s “Sling Blue” channel bundle. This option doesn’t include a free trial, but it’s the cheapest long-term streaming service with both these channels, and you can get your first month for just $10:

Get Sling TV

Once signed up for Sling TV, you can watch the 2021 US Olympic Swimming Trials live on the Sling TV app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV or Fire Stick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, Samsung Smart TV, LG Smart TV, Android TV, airTV Mini, Oculus, Portal, iPhone, Android phone, iPad or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the Sling TV website.

If you can’t watch live, Sling TV comes included with 50 hours of cloud DVR.


Hulu With Live TV

You can watch a live stream of NBC (live in most markets), NBC Sports Network and 65+ other TV channels via Hulu With Live TV, which you can try out for free with a seven-day trial:

Hulu With Live TV Free Trial

Once signed up for Hulu With Live TV, you can watch the 2021 US Olympic Swimming Trials live on the Hulu app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV or Fire Stick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Samsung Smart TV, LG Smart TV, Android TV, iPhone, Android phone, iPad or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the Hulu website.

If you can’t watch live, Hulu with Live TV also comes with 50 hours of Cloud DVR storage (with the ability to upgrade to “Enhanced Cloud DVR,” which gives you 200 hours of DVR space and the ability to fast forward through commercials).


US Olympic Swimming Trials 2021 Preview

The top two finishers in each event final will earn spots on the Olympic team, with the exception of the 100- and 200-meter freestyles events, in which up to four athletes could make the cut.

A primary storyline heading into the trials is the return of Ryan Lochte. Years after the scandal that led to his exit from the sport in which he filed a false robbery report in Rio, Lochte will compete and attempt to qualify for the Olympic team. The bigger story, however, is the return of the competition after a hiatus due to the global pandemic last year.

“I think the kids are dying to race,” Ray Looze, coach of breaststroke star Lilly King, said heading into the trials.

“If anybody sets a world record, that’s a phenomenal accomplishment,” he added. “But I think there’s going to be some world records that go down because there’s been some people that have had to go through a great deal and they really, really want it bad.”

Preliminary events beginning on June 13 include:

–The men’s 400-meter individual medley, which will feature Rio Olympians Chase Kalisz (silver), and Jay Litherland (fifth), along with Carson Foster.

–The women’s 100-meter butterfly, which features Rio bronze medalist Dana Vollmer, Kelsi Dahlia, Katie McLaughlin, Claire Curzan and Torri Huske competing.

–Conor Dwyer, Connor Jaeger, Zane Grothe, Grant Shoults, Kieran Smith, Jake Magahey and Chris Wieser will all compete in the men’s 400-meter freestyle, which kicks off Sunday.

–The women’s 400-meter individual medley will feature Rio silver medalist Maya DiRado, Elizabeth Beisel, Ally McHugh, Brooke Forde, Melanie Margalis, Madisyn Cox and Leah Smith.

–In the men’s 100-meter breaststroke, Rio bronze medalist Cody Miller, Kevin Cordes, Andrew Wilson, Michael Andrew and Nic Fink will all be vying for top times.

It will be the first time since 1996 that decorated Olympian Michael Phelps will be absent from the Olympic swimming trials — a fact that could give others a chance at the spotlight.

“They’ll have more opportunities because Phelps isn’t there,” former swimming star Matt Biondi said. “Phelps carried the torch and ran the miles. Now he’s passing it off.”

“Our U.S. team is stacked,” Biondi added. “We have strong contingencies on both the male and female sides.”


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