Jamison Newlander: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Jamison Newlander

Getty Jamison Newlander is pictured.

Jamison Newlander is an actor who appeared in the 1987 vampire movie The Lost Boys.

Read on for our 5 Fast Facts on Newlander.


1. Newlander Played Alan Frog in “The Lost Boys”

The 17-year-old joined Corey Feldman, who played his character’s brother Edgar Frog in The Lost Boys. Corey Haim took a leading role as Sam. The film was a first major production for each of the three teenagers and their performances garnered critical acclaim that helped box office sales gross more than $32 million, launching their careers as child stars.

The Lost Boys original film was a cultural force created by Joel Schumacher. Hyper-sexuality verging on pack-driven cruelty, squeaky stiff leather, prestige haircuts and a synth-driven soundtrack created a fantasy into which a group of teenage boys were dropped. The resulting surreality made the suspension of disbelief imperceptible for viewers. Instead of a film credit, Schumacher gave his cast a new world.


2. The Actor Now Works in Marketing

Today, Newlander is a health insurance marketing person with a nine-to-five job. In 2004, he began a full-time job in marketing communications for a health benefits company.

He also has two children and a wife. Newlander married actress Hanny Nicole Landau in 2002 at the Crystal Plaza in Livingston, New Jersey.


3. Newlander Grew Up in Beverly Hills

Jamison Newlander was attending Beverly Hills High School when he landed the role of Alan Frog in The Lost Boys. His previous acting work included an appearance in a 1986 episode of Valerie, a TV series that aired from 1986-1991 starring Jason Bateman. He began acting in commercials during his childhood after he told his mother he wanted to pursue a medical career, prompting her to suggest that he start saving money for medical school, says his bio.

Newlander grew up in Beverly Hills. His father Ben and his mother Roberta (Bobbie) married in 1965 and divorced by 1974, when Newlander was four years old. He has two older sisters, Corie and Lorey. His father remarried Diane Newlander (nee Hancock) in 1983.

Unlike Corey Feldman and Corey Haim (known as The Two Coreys), Newlander’s experience as a child actor was far less public, as was the scrutiny into his personal life as he continued his career into adulthood. He did maintain a peripheral friendship with Feldman as they continued to work together on projects throughout their career, mostly focusing on The Lost Boys franchise and the lives of Feldman and Haim.


4. Newlander Also Was a Stage Actor

After The Lost Boys, Newlander had a minor role in The Blob (1988), cast as “Anthony.” He graduated from Beverly Hills High School and attended NYU where he received his BFA in acting. Throughout his 20s, he performed on stage in New York, Kentucky, Vermont and California. He wrote, directed, produced and played the leading role in a comedy short entitled Rooster, alongside his wife, Hanny. The film played in the Hamptons International Film Festival in 2003.

He was called back to the set of The Lost Boys in 2008 to reprise his role as Alan Frog. The franchise was producing its second installment, The Lost Boys: The Tribe, and he joined Feldman and Haim in the cast of the direct-to-DVD video. His scenes were deleted before the video was released, although he did receive credit for his work. Again, in 2010, he and Feldman were called back to film the third installment, The Lost Boys: The Thirst.


5. In Recent Years Newlander Has Kept a Low Profile

Aside from a few cameo appearances in Feldman’s reality show and a role in a Lifetime movie, he’s kept a low profile.

Feldman’s life stands in stark contrast, with his lifestyle choices, celebrity appearances and abuse allegations being held to scrutiny by the media. Haim died at the age of 38 completely destitute. Feldman has said that, for child actors, their success beyond childhood depends on parenting and getting the support and supervision they need to make the right choices and stay clear of the abuse that he maintains is pervasive in Hollywood.