Kid of the Year 2020 Live Stream: How to Watch Online for Free

Pictured: Nickelodeon and Time Magazine's "Kid Of The Year" special, hosted by Trevor Noah, with a kid committee including Young Dylan, Chinguun Sergelen, Chif Ivy and Sky Katz, and Time For Kids reporters Tiana Sirmans and Raunak Singh.

Nickelodeon Pictured: Nickelodeon and Time Magazine's "Kid Of The Year" special, hosted by Trevor Noah, with a kid committee including Young Dylan, Chinguun Sergelen, Chif Ivy and Sky Katz, and Time For Kids reporters Tiana Sirmans and Raunak Singh.

The first-ever TIME Kid of the Year TV special is premiering Friday, December 4 at 7:30 p.m. ET/PT on Nickelodeon, TV Land, TeenNick, and Nicktoons.

If you don’t have cable, here’s how you can watch a live stream of the 2020 Kid of the Year special online for free:

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Philo TV

You can watch a live stream of Nickelodeon, TV Land, TeenNick, Nicktoons and 60+ other TV channels on Philo TV, which comes with a seven-day free trial:

Philo Free Trial

Once signed up for Philo, you can watch the Kid of the Year 2020 special live on the Philo app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV or Firestick, Apple TV, Chromecast (compatible on Android mobile), iPhone, Android phone, iPad or Android tablet. You can also watch on your computer on the Philo website.

If you can’t watch live, Philo allows you to DVR programs and watch them up to 30 days later. And even if you forget to DVR something, Philo also comes with a 72-hour rewind feature, which lets you to watch most shows on-demand if they have aired in the last three days.


FuboTV

You can watch a live stream of Nickelodeon, TV Land and 100-plus other TV channels on FuboTV, which comes with a seven-day free trial:

FuboTV Free Trial

Once signed up for FuboTV, you can watch the Kid of the Year 2020 special live on the FuboTV app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV or Firestick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, Samsung Smart TV, Android TV, iPhone, Android phone, iPad or Android tablet. You can also watch on your computer via the FuboTV website.

If you can’t watch live, FuboTV comes with 250 hours of cloud DVR space, as well as a 72-hour look-back feature, which allows you to watch most shows on-demand within three days (and sometimes longer) of their conclusion, even if you don’t record them.


Vidgo

You can watch a live stream of Nickelodeon, TV Land, TeenNick and 65+ other TV channels on Vidgo, which you can try with a free seven-day trial:

Vidgo Free Trial

Once signed up for Vidgo, you can watch the Kid of the Year 2020 special live on the Vidgo app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV, or Firestick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Android TV, iPhone, Android phone, iPad, or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the Vidgo website.


Kid of the Year 2020 Preview

VideoVideo related to kid of the year 2020 live stream: how to watch online for free2020-12-04T13:00:39-05:00

Hosted by Trevor Noah of The Daily Show, this special will introduce the Top 5 honorees for Kid of the Year ahead of the winner being named. There will also be kids performing their “acts of awesome” on the special. The ultimate Kid of the Year winner will be featured on a TIME cover with a companion story in TIME for Kids.

Celebrities making appearances include Kristen Bell, Simone Biles, Dixie D’Amelio, Billie Eilish, Rob Gronkowski, Neil Patrick Harris, Chris Hemsworth, Ken Jeong, Angelina Jolie, Chloe Kim, Brie Larson, Zachary Levi, Russell Westbrook, Malala Yousafzai, and many more.

The Top 20 Finalists, according to the Nickelodeon press release, are:

Rebekah Bruesehoff (13; Camden County, N.J.), a transgender activist working to strengthen support systems for transgender and LGBTQ+ youth and show the world thatLGBTQ+ kids are just like all other kids and deserve the same love, protections, and representation.

Keedron Bryant (13; Jacksonville, Fla.), a musician and activist using his passion for music to help inspire social change, with the song “I Just Wanna Live” becoming an anthem for the Black Lives Matter movement.

Dylan Capshaw (14; Scottsdale, Ariz.), a wildlife activist and COVID-19 frontline worker advocate, helping animals in need through his nonprofit, Dylan Capshaw WildlifeFoundation, and printing 3D face-shields to help protect the frontline workers battling the coronavirus pandemic, which he ships through his nonprofit, For the Frontline.

Jack Dalton (10; Nashua, N.H.), a kid conservationist helping to educate other kids on how important it is for them to be involved in preserving the environment and the world through his fundraising campaigns and videos on YouTube. He also uses his status as a youth Ambassador for the international nonprofit Orangutan Alliance to sell 100% recycled Kid Conservationist bags in support of orangutan rehabilitation, with all proceeds being donated to the organization.

Chloe Mei Espinosa (14; Newport Beach, Calif.), an environmental advocate working to protect the oceans through the reduction of single-use plastic straws worldwide, including providing education through her website, SkipthePlasticStraw.com.

Tyler Gordon (14; San Jose, Calif.), an artist using his love of painting to advocate for anti-bullying and social justice issues, as well as helping other kids with speech impediments through his foundation, Tongue Tyed.

Ryan Hickman (11; San Juan Capistrano, Calif.), an environmental advocate working to spread awareness of recycling and its ability to help save the planet through his company, Ryan’s Recycling, and his nonprofit, Project3R. He recycles over 30,000 cans and bottles each month, with over 1.1 million recycled to-date.

Hannah Jackson (16; Washington, D.C.), a criminal justice reform advocate fighting for the rights of those in the prison system and those directly affected by it, including having successfully lobbied Congress and the White House for the bi-partisan “First Step Act.”

Elijah Lee (12; Richmond, Va.), a child abuse and social justice activist devoted to combating child abuse and helping those currently facing it, including organizing his own annual anti-child abuse march and serving as a speaker on the issue at conferences.

Ian McKenna (16; Austin, Texas), an activist committed to providing hunger relief to kids and their families through harvesting fresh produce for them and educating others on its importance.

Samaira Mehta (12; Santa Clara, Calif.), a tech entrepreneur with a passion for teaching and spreading the love of coding through her initiative “Yes, 1 Billion Kids Can Code” and her coding ecosystem company, CoderBunnyz.

Anna Miller (13; Baltimore), an accessibility activist encouraging kids to code while using her rare genetic disorder, Osteogenesis Imperfecta, to help spread her message of positivity, inclusivity and equity for all.

Caleb Oh (15; Gambrills, Md.), a philanthropist helping the food insecure, homeless and foster children in his community and inspiring young people to serve others through his nonprofit, Kid Changemakers.

Gitanjali Rao (14; Lone Tree, Colo.), an inventor and scientist who centers her work around empathy to advocate for a people-centered approach to invention and problem-solving and provide innovation sessions to students around the globe to inspire them to create their own creative solutions to world problems.

Jordan Reeves (14; Columbia, Mo.), an advocate for those with physical disabilities working to challenge perceptions through designing new solutions and providing education through digital workshops with her nonprofit, Born Just Right.

Sophia Scott (17; Los Angeles), an education activist working to reduce the socioeconomic disparities in education during the COVID-19 pandemic by offering high-quality academic support for free through her nonprofit, QuaranTEENS Tutoring.

Za’Nia Stinson (14; Charlotte, N.C.), a philanthropist passionate about helping homeless women and children through providing food and toiletry items to local shelters with her nonprofit, Z Feeds Angel Food Project.

Ronak Suchindra (13; Chester Springs, Pa.), an activist dedicated to helping spread the love of learning by motivating youth to help teach kids all around the world through his non-profit organization, Kids Connect.

Khloe Thompson (13; Irvine, Calif.), a philanthropist working to inspire other kids to create change and provide essential items to the Los Angeles homeless community through her nonprofit, Khloe Kares, as well as traveling to Ghana to help build wells for villages in need.

Bellen Woodard (9; Loudoun County, Va.), the world’s first crayon activist highlighting the issues of empathy, leadership and diversity through the eyes and experiences of a child. Her campaign, The More than Peach Project, donates its own skin-tone and multicultural crayons and sketchbooks to students and senior citizens.


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