Melania Trump’s Speech Versus Michelle Obama’s Speech: Which Was Better? [POLL]

Getty Michelle Obama and Melania Trump on President Trump's inauguration day.

First lady Melania Trump gave a keynote speech at the Republican National Convention on Tuesday night, August 25. After the allegations that her 2016 Convention speech plagiarized former first lady Michelle Obama’s earlier speech, people will no doubt be comparing Trump’s speech to Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention last week.  So how do the two speeches compare?

At the end of this article is a Twitter poll that you can participate in to share your opinion on whether Michelle Obama’s or Melania Trump’s speech was better. 


Melania Trump Was Under Pressure Tonight After Her 2016 Speech

Melania Trump faced scrutiny following the allegations about her 2016 speech. Her chief of staff Stephanie Grisham said before Trump’s 2020 RNC speech that it would be the longest speech in her time as first lady and in her time campaigning, CNN reported. Her speeches are typically three to seven minutes.

A White House official told CNN that Trump’s speech would look at her experiences as first lady, highlight her plans for a second term and include “a forceful push of support for her husband.” The official said the speech wasn’t vetted by the West Wing, but Trump has been involved in writing the speech with a senior aide.

Grisham told CNN that the speech would be forward-looking, positive and uplifting.

During her speech — delivered in front of a small live audience in the Rose Garden, where she oversaw recent renovations — Trump spoke about the passage of the 19th Amendment and the unveiling of a women’s suffrage exhibit. She then talked about her arrival in the United States and how she became a citizen in 2006, and how she was able to achieve her own American dream.

You can watch Trump’s speech below.

First Lady Melania Trump's 2020 Republican National Convention Speech | FULLFirst Lady Melania Trump's Full Remarks at the 2020 Republican National Convention. #RNC2020 #BeBest2020-08-26T03:17:49Z

Obama’s speech was delivered from her vacation home on Martha’s Vineyard. Her “VOTE” necklace stole the show and quickly trended on Twitter. She spoke about leadership and the loss of shared values, as people argue about wearing masks and focus on greed. She talked about labeling other citizens as enemies and how the country needs unity again. She talked about how divided the country is and how important it is to find empathy again. You can watch her speech below.

Watch Michelle Obama's Full Speech At The 2020 DNC | NBC NewsFormer First Lady Michelle Obama asks voters to “vote for Joe Biden like our lives depend on it” and says Trump “is the wrong president for our country” during her speech at the DNC. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and…2020-08-18T03:52:05Z


A Passage in Trump’s 2016 Speech Was Similar to Obama’s 2008 Speech

Trump’s speech is under scrutiny tonight because of the allegation that her 2016 RNC speech had plagiarized Obama’s 2008 speech at the Democratic National Convention. Here’s a side-by-side comparison of the two speeches provided by CNN.

Melania Trump and Michelle Obama side-by-side comparisonAt least one passage in Melania Trump's speech Monday night at the Republican National Convention plagiarized Michelle Obama's speech to the Democratic National Convention in 2008.2016-07-19T05:36:45Z

In 2016, Trump spoke on the first night of the Republican National Convention, discussing the importance of honesty and inclusivity. BBC shared some comparisons of the two speeches.

In one part of the speech, Trump said: “My parents impressed on me the values that you work hard for what you want in life; that your word is your bond and you do what you say and keep your promise; that you treat people with respect.”

Obama had said in 2008: “Barack and I were raised with so many of the same values: that you work hard for what you want in life; that your word is your bond and you do what you say you’re going to do; that you treat people with dignity and respect, even if you don’t know them, and even if you don’t agree with them.”

Trump also said: “[My parents] taught me to show the values and morals in my daily life. That is the lesson that I continue to pass along to our son. And we need to pass those lessons on to the many generations to follow, because we want our children in this nation to know that the only limit to your achievements is the strength of your dreams and your willingness to work for them.”

Obama said: “And Barack Obama and I set out to build lives guided by these values, and pass them on to the next generations. Because we want our children, and all children in this nation, to know that the only limit to the height of your achievement is the reach of your dreams and your willingness to work for them.”

The Trump campaign denied the allegations at the time. CNN reported that Trump’s aides said it was media bias and blamed Hillary Clinton’s campaign for the story.

Paul Manafort told CNN: “To think that she would do something like that knowing how scrutinized her speech was going to be last night is just really absurd.”

Sean Spicer said the phrases were commonly used, and you might even hear them in My Little Pony.


POLL: Whose 2020 Speech Did You Think Was Better?

So which 2020 speech did you think was better? Melania Trump’s speech at the RNC or Michelle Obama’s speech at the DNC last week? Vote in the Twitter poll below. You’ll be able to see the results of the poll once you vote.

You can also vote in a poll comparing her speech to Jill Biden’s here.

Vote to let us know if you liked Mike Pence’s speech or Kamala Harris’s speech better here.

Kamala Harris is planning a speech Thursday night in Washington, D.C. to “counter” President Donald Trump’s speech at the convention, The Hill reported. Stay tuned to this author’s page account for a poll where you can vote on those two speeches Thursday night.

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