Brett Kavanaugh & the ‘FFFFFFFourth of July’: What People Are Saying About it

christine blasey ford brett kavanaugh

Getty/Palo Alto University Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh

Brett Kavanaugh’s yearbook page from his days at Georgetown Prep has undergone severe scrutiny and speculation in recent weeks. His yearbook page has only drawn more attention in light of the sexual assault allegations that have been brought against him by multiple women, most notably Christine Blasey Ford and Deborah Ramirez.

One line in particular has left several people wondering, and has drawn the focus of Michael Avenatti, the lawyer for one of the Kavanaugh accusers who has yet to reveal her identity publicly.

Avenatti tweeted a cryptic message on September 23, explaining what he believed was the real meaning behind Kavanaugh’s “FFFFFFourth of July” shoutout in his yearbook page, as well as hinting of a knowledge towards other lines, too.

To the SJC, Kavanaugh explained the phrase as having to do with the way one of his former classmates used to say “f*ck you.”

On Tuesday, a high school letter written by Brett Kavanaugh in 1983 was released by The New York Times. In the letter, Kavanaugh opted to write “FFFFF” as a sign-off.

Here’s what you need to know about the speculation surrounding this strange phrase.


Kavanaugh Claimed the ‘FFFFFFourth of July’ Had Nothing to do With Sexual Innuendos

In a transcript of Kavanaugh’s conversation with the SJC that was released on Wednesday, Kavanaugh denied that the phrase had anything to do with a sexual innuendo. He said,

“So, ‘FFF,’ all that refers to is a friend of ours in the class, when he would say ‘fuck you,’ he would often say it with a wind-up, like ‘ffffuck you.’ And for reasons that are not clear to me today, at age 15 and 16, the whole group of guys thought that was a funny, inside thing, and it got shortened to the sound I just made was a number of F’s rolling together.”

When asked to explain why he included July in the reference, Kavanaugh said, “Best recollection would be that it’s a specific party where [that guy] got in a fight.”


Avenatti Believes the ‘FFFFFFFourth of July’ Reference Is a Sexual Innuendo

In a series of cryptic tweets on Sunday evening, Avenatti revealed that he was representing a new Kavanaugh accuser, and that he had information related to Kavanaugh’s past, in addition.

Avenatti tweeted, “Brett Kavanaugh must also be asked about this entry in his yearbook: ‘FFFFFFFourth of July.’ We believe that this stands for: Find them, French them, Feel them, Finger them, F*ck them, Forget them. As well as the term ‘Devil’s Triangle.’ Perhaps Sen. Grassley can ask him.

Urban Dictionary confirms that “FFFF” often is an acronym for “Find ’em, Feel ’em, Fuck ’em & Forget ’em.”

What’s more, Kavanaugh also references “boofing” in his yearbook page, which is defined by Urban Dictionary as the “abuse of any licit or illicit substance via insertion into one’s rectum.”

As for the “Devil’s Triangle” term in Kavanaugh’s yearbook that Avenatti also references, Urban Dictionary defines it as “inserting your d*ck into all three holes,” or alternatively, “A threesome with 1 woman and 2 men. It is important to remember that straight men do not make eye contact while in the act. Doing so will question their sexuality.”


The Reference to Being a “Renate Alumnius” Has Also Become the Focus of Speculation After a NYT Report on Renate Schroeder Dolphin

Renate Schroeder Dolphin is a woman who was referenced by name in Brett Kavanaugh’s yearbook, according to a new report by The New York Times.

While Kavanaugh was at Georgetown Prep, Dolphin was a student at an all-girls Catholic School nearby. Two of Kavanaugh’s classmates told The New York Times that the “Renate Alumni” joke was related to “unsubstantiated boasting about their conquests” at the time.

According to The New York Times, Dolphin only learned about this inside joke a few days ago. In a statement, she said, “I learned about these yearbook pages only a few days ago. I don’t know what ‘Renate Alumnus’ actually means. I can’t begin to comprehend what goes through the minds of 17-year-old boys who write such things, but the insinuation is horrible, hurtful and simply untrue. I pray their daughters are never treated this way. I will have no further comment.”

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