WATCH: Video, Photo Show Herman Cain Without Mask at Trump’s Tulsa Rally

herman cain cause of death

Getty Herman Cain at a different event.

Herman Cain, the former Republican presidential candidate and business executive, has died at age 74 after being hospitalized for COVID-19. Less than two weeks before Cain was diagnosed with coronavirus, he was captured on video without a mask at President Donald Trump’s rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Here’s the video, which captures scenes of Cain bobbing his head as other people dance during the rally. He’s not wearing a mask, a fact also made clear by a photo that he posted to his Twitter page from the rally.

VideoVideo related to watch: video, photo show herman cain without mask at trump’s tulsa rally2020-07-30T12:34:37-04:00

Here’s the photo of Cain at the Trump rally. “Here’s just a few of the #BlackVoicesForTrump at tonight’s rally! Having a fantastic time! #TulsaRally2020 #Trumptulsa #TulsaTrumprally #MAGA #Trump2020 #Trump2020Landslide,” he wrote in the caption.

His death was formally announced on his official Facebook page. “We have heartbreaking news for you this morning, but please join us in celebrating our boss’s life,” the post, on July 30, 2020 read. “We’re heartbroken, and the world is poorer: Herman Cain has gone to be with the Lord,” a post on Cain’s website was titled.

Dan Calabrese, the editor of Cain’s website, wrote a lengthy statement on Cain’s website, confirming that Cain was hospitalized for COVID-19.

Here’s what you need to know:


Cain Was Hospitalized for COVID-19 on July 1, Just Days After the Trump Rally in Tulsa

Herman Cain

Getty/Daniel BoczarskiHerman Cain, pictured in August 2016.

According to CNBC, Cain was also a “74-year-old survivor of stage 4 colon cancer,” and attended President Donald Trump’s Tulsa, Oklahoma rally before being diagnosed with coronavirus.

A July 2 statement released by Cain’s social media said: “There is no way of knowing for sure how or where Mr. Cain contracted the coronavirus.”

According to Business Insider, two days before Cain’s COVID-19 diagnosis, he tweeted support that masks weren’t being required at the Tulsa rally. The tweet is now deleted. “Masks will not be mandatory for the event, which will be attended by President Trump. PEOPLE ARE FED UP!”

He also recently tweeted a story about people not wanting to get a COVID-19 vaccine even if one is found, writing, “Our government, and our media, have incinerated their credibility. So, is it any wonder that people are skeptical? #Coronavirus.”

He was hospitalized for COVID-19 on July 1 and tested positive for the virus two days before that, according to CNBC. The rally was held on June 20. According to CNBC, masks were not required but temperatures were checked; CNN reported that eight members of the president’s rally advance team tested positive for COVID-19 and were quarantined. According to CNN, it’s “unknown where Cain contracted the virus.”

CNN reported that Cain died of coronavirus.

According to the CDC, “The incubation period for COVID-19 is thought to extend to 14 days, with a median time of 4-5 days from exposure to symptoms onset.1-3 One study reported that 97.5% of persons with COVID-19 who develop symptoms will do so within 11.5 days of SARS-CoV-2 infection.”

“I realize people will speculate about the Tulsa rally, but Herman did a lot of traveling the past week,” Calabrese wrote previously on his website earlier in July. “I don’t think there’s any way to trace this to the one specific contact that caused him to be infected. We’ll never know.”

The Washington Post reported that the majority of rally attendees didn’t wear masks. “I’ve been watching the fake news for weeks now, and everything is negative,” the president said at the rally, according to The Post. “Don’t go, don’t come, don’t do anything. Today it was like, I’ve never seen anything like it. … You are warriors.”

The Post reported that Tulsa, Oklahoma, reported a surge of COVID-19 cases after the rally, with a top health official suggesting the rally and other events, such as protests, “more than likely” helped cause it. “The past two days we’ve had almost 500 cases, and we know we had several large events a little over two weeks ago, which is about right,” Tulsa Health Department Executive Director Bruce Dart said during a news conference, The Post Reported. “So I guess we just connect the dots.”


Doctors Never Could Quite ‘Advance Him to the Recovery Phase’ After Cain Contracted COVID-19

Herman Cain

Getty/Rick DiamondFormer Godfathers Pizza CEO and GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain.

According to Calabrese’s statement, Cain had COVID-19, and it landed him in the hospital. “Let me deal with some of the particulars of the last few weeks. We knew when he was first hospitalized with COVID-19 that this was going to be a rough fight. He had trouble breathing and was taken to the hospital by ambulance. We all prayed that the initial meds they gave him would get his breathing back to normal, but it became clear pretty quickly that he was in for a battle,” he wrote.

They kept his worsening condition quiet.

“We didn’t release detailed updates on his condition to the public or to the media because neither his family nor we thought there was any reason for that,” Calabrese wrote. “There were hopeful indicators, including a mere five days ago when doctors told us they thought he would eventually recover, although it wouldn’t be quick. We were relieved to be told that, and passed on the news via Herman’s social media. And yet we also felt real concern about the fact that he never quite seemed to get to the point where the doctors could advance him to the recovery phase.”

“You’re never ready for the kind of news we are grappling with this morning. But we have no choice but to seek and find God’s strength and comfort to deal with it,” Calabrese’s statement started on the Cain website. “Herman Cain – our boss, our friend, like a father to so many of us – has passed away. He’s entering the presence of the Savior he’s served as an associate minister at Antioch Baptist Church in Atlanta for, and preparing for his reward.”

Calabrese quoted a Bible verse: “God ‘will repay each person according to what they have done.’ To those who by persistence in doing good seek glory, honor and immortality, he will give eternal life,” adding, “By that measure, we expect the boss is in for some kind of welcome, because all of us who knew him are well aware of how much good he did.”

According to Calabrese’s statement, Cain was in a high-risk group for COVID-19 because he had a history of cancer.

“Herman was 74. Although he was basically pretty healthy in recent years, he was still in a high-risk group because of his history with cancer. We all prayed so hard every day. We knew the time would come when the Lord would call him home, but we really liked having him here with us, and we held out hope he’d have a full recovery,” Calabrese wrote.

In 2011, The Washington Post reported that Cain “survived a bout of advanced colon cancer.” In 2006, he was diagnosed with stage four colon cancer, meaning the cancer had spread. “In Cain’s case, doctors found a tumor in his liver, a common location for colon cancer to spread,” the Post reported at that time.

Cain beat bad odds; The Post reported that only about “6 to 12 percent of patients with stage IV colon cancer survive five years.”

“Herman had just started hosting a new show on Newsmax TV. He was so excited about it, and so pumped up about playing a role in the 2020 election campaign. At an age when a lot of people are looking to slow down, he was taking on new projects, booking speaking opportunities. Ever the dealmaker, he would fill me in with details of his negotiations with people on any number of things. I would always tell him I should have him negotiate my deals with my business’s other clients, because he did them better than anyone.”

He added: “The last time I talked to him was when he was getting ready to start the Newsmax show. He was really pumped about it, and I was happy for him because he’d walked away from a nice contributor gig at Fox a couple years early to head a Super PAC. When that ran its course, Herman really wanted to get back into TV, and this afforded him a beautiful opportunity. Alas, he only ever got to host one episode.”

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