SpaceX Falcon Heavy Launch Time & Live Stream: Watch Online Today, April 11

Arabsat-6A MissionSpaceX is targeting Thursday, April 11 for a Falcon Heavy launch of the Arabsat-6A satellite from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The primary launch window opens at 6:35 p.m. EDT, or 22:35 UTC, and closes at 8:31 p.m. EDT, or 00:31 UTC on Friday, April 12. The satellite will be deployed approximately 34 minutes after liftoff. Following booster separation, Falcon Heavy’s two side boosters will attempt to land at SpaceX’s Landing Zones 1 and 2 (LZ-1 and LZ-2) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Falcon Heavy’s center core will attempt to land on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean.2019-04-12T00:43:47.000Z

The launch of SpaceX‘s Falcon Heavy is expected to happen today, April 11, after the launch was delayed yesterday due to high wind shear. The first Falcon Heavy launch of any kind happened about a year ago, and today’s launch will be the second launch and the first commercial launch. SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy will launch the Arabsat-6A satellite from Launch Complex 39Z (LC-39Z) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. You can watch a live stream of the watch in the video above when it happens, along with multiple live streams below. Read on for more details about the time of the launch and to see more streams.

The Falcon Heavy launch is currently expected to happen today, April 11, at 6:35 p.m. Eastern. The launch window for today closes at 8:31 p.m. Eastern. Remember, you can click the icon at the bottom right of the video above to switch between the countdown camera and the hosted webcast.

It looks like the launch may happen on time.

The launch window was originally scheduled for yesterday, Wednesday, April 10. But the liftoff was pushed back due to high wind shear.

Here’s another live stream that will show the launch live from five miles away.

Watch SpaceX's second Falcon Heavy launch LIVE from 5 miles away!LIVE, on site from Kennedy Space Center's NASA causeway, just 5 miles (7 km) from the landing and 6.5 miles (10 km) from the launch! This is one of the absolute best places to see a Falcon Heavy rocket launch and land. SpaceX will be launching its second Falcon Heavy rocket carrying the Arabsat-6A communications satellite to orbit. This Falcon Heavy is brand new, composed of two block 5 side boosters (B15052 & B1053) and a single block 5 core booster (B1055). After separating from the core booster, the two side boosters will return to the launch site and land at Landing Zones 1 & 2 (LZ-1 & LZ-2). Following separation from the second stage, the core booster will be landing on Autonomous Spaceport Drone Ship Of Course I Still Love You (OCISLY). Need more info? Check here! – https://everydayastronaut.com/prelaunch-preview-falcon-heavy-arabsat-6a/ ———————————— Show your support by becoming a Patreon – http://patreon.com/everydayastronaut The best place for all your space merch needs! https://everydayastronaut.com/shop/ I'm the cohost of an awesome podcast where we talk all about current technologies and how they shape our future! http://ourludicrousfuture.com or here on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/ourludicrousfuture2019-04-11T23:33:01.000Z

And here’s a stream from Fox 10 Phoenix:

News Now Stream Part 2 4/11/19 (FNN)Sharing a mix of breaking news, Arizona stories, engaging discussions, and popular culture.2019-04-12T03:34:09.000Z

 

The satellite will be deployed about 34 minutes after liftoff. After booster separation, the two side boosters will attempt to land at SpaceX’s two landing zones at Cape Canaveral Air Force base in Florida. The center core will attempt to land on the droneship in the Atlantic Ocean called “Of Course I Still Love You.”

Some interesting points to note about today’s launch. First, the center core is going to burn 25 seconds longer than it did during the demo last year. And it’s landing at its furthest distance so far. There also won’t be a technical webcast, as SpaceX does not seem to be doing those as often anymore. They do show flight animation on a second camera stream, but it typically lacks the telemetry data that people enjoyed on the technical webcast.

According to Elon Musk, this is the first flight for Falcon Heavy Block 5 and he’s estimating a failure risk of 5 to 10 percent.

Here’s the mission timeline for today, as shared by SpaceX for after the launch. The times are in minutes and seconds after launch.

  • 01:09 Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)
  • 02:30 Booster engine cutoff (BECO)
  • 02:34 Side boosters separate from center core
  • 02:51 Side boosters begin boostback burn
  • 03:31 Center core engine shutdown/main engine cutoff (MECO)
  • 03:35 Center core and 2nd stage separate
  • 03:42 2nd stage engine starts
  • 04:07 Fairing deployment
  • 06:11 Side boosters begin entry burn
  • 07:00 Center core begins entry burn
  • 07:51 Side booster landings
  • 08:48 2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO-1)
  • 09:48 Center core landing
  • 27:34 2nd stage engine restarts
  • 29:00 2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO-2)
  • 34:02 Arabsat-6A satellite deployment

In other words, the satellites will be deployed about 34 minutes after launch. The side booster landings will be about 7:51 after launch and the center core landing will be about 9:48 after launch.