How to Watch Twitter Hacker Documentary Online

THE NEW YORK TIMES PRESENTS “The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter," Friday, November 20, 10:00 pm

FX THE NEW YORK TIMES PRESENTS “The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter," Friday, November 20, 10:00 pm

FX launched a new series this year called The New York Times Presents. Its latest episode is “The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter,” and it premieres Friday, November 20 at 10 p.m. ET/PT on FX.

If you don’t have cable, here’s how to watch The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter streaming online for free:

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FuboTV

You can watch a live stream of FX and 100-plus other TV channels on FuboTV, which comes with a seven-day free trial:

FuboTV Free Trial

Once signed up for FuboTV, you can watch The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter live on the FuboTV app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV or Firestick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, Samsung Smart TV, Android TV, iPhone, Android phone, iPad or Android tablet. You can also watch on your computer via the FuboTV website.

If you can’t watch live, FuboTV comes with 250 hours of cloud DVR space, as well as a 72-hour look-back feature, which allows you to watch most shows on-demand within three days (and sometimes longer) of their conclusion, even if you don’t record them.


Hulu With Live TV

You can watch a live stream of FX and 65+ other TV channels via Hulu With Live TV, which you can try out for free with a seven-day trial:

Hulu With Live TV Free Trial

Once signed up for Hulu With Live TV, you can watch The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter live on the Hulu app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV, or Firestick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Samsung Smart TV, LG Smart TV, Android TV, iPhone, Android phone, iPad, or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the Hulu website.

If you can’t watch live, Hulu with Live TV comes with both its extensive on-demand library (which will include The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter by the next day) and 50 hours of Cloud DVR storage (with the ability to upgrade to “Enhanced Cloud DVR,” which gives you 200 hours of DVR space and the ability to fast forward through commercials).


Vidgo

You can watch a live stream of FX and 65+ other TV channels on Vidgo, which you can try with a free seven-day trial:

Vidgo Free Trial

Once signed up for Vidgo, you can watch The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter live on the Vidgo app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV, or Firestick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Android TV, iPhone, Android phone, iPad, or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the Vidgo website.


Sling TV

You can watch a live stream of FX and 40-plus other TV channels via Sling TV’s “Sling Blue” bundle. It comes with a free three-day trial, but if you bypass that, you can get $10 off your first month, and get Showtime, Starz, and Epix included for free:

Get Sling TV

Once signed up for Sling TV, you can watch The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter live on the Sling TV app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV, or Firestick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One, Samsung Smart TV, LG Smart TV, Android TV, airTV Mini, Oculus, Portal, iPhone, Android phone, iPad, or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the Sling TV website.

If you can’t watch live, Sling TV comes included with 10 hours of cloud DVR.


‘The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter’ Preview

The Teenager Who Hacked Twitter chronicles the online exploits of Graham Clark, a 17-year-old from Tampa, Florida, who hacked into some of the highest-profile accounts on Twitter, including Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Kanye West, Joe Biden, and Barack Obama, in an attempt to scam people out of Bitcoin.

According to a New York Times profile, Clark was arrested in August and charged with 30 felony counts.

The article said Clark started out in Minecraft, then moved to setting up a YouTube channel where he would post videos of himself playing a violent version of Minecraft called “Hardcore Factions.”

Exposing "Open/Feed": A Scammer, A Liar, A DdoserAlso, proof he fakes his giveaways. On his channel, over a month ago he supposedly gave away the account "Feed" when he still uses it and his friend still used it. Open went in Prime TS and said Feed was his alt, and both are now IP Banned. They are IP banned on Minehq as…2016-10-16T22:13:32Z

His monetary scams started in Minecraft as well. He would appear to sell desirable usernames and loot to other players and then disappear after the players sent him money. Some of the people he scammed eventually posted videos to YouTube where Clark can be heard using racist and sexist slurs while talking about being homeschooled and making $5000 per month from his Minecraft scams.

Clark eventually moved on to Fortnite and cryptocurrency and then began hacking. In 2019, he gained control of the phone of Gregg Bennett, a tech investor in the Seattle area. Within minutes, Clark and his accomplices had taken over Bennett’s accounts, as well as 164 Bitcoins that were worth $856,000 at the time and would be worth $1.8 million today. The Secret Service eventually seized 100 of the stolen Bitcoins from Clark, with 64 other stolen Bitcoins remaining lost.

Less than two weeks after the Bitcoin seizure, Clark began trying to hack Twitter. He eventually succeeded and the whole story is now the “Teenager Who Hacked Twitter” episode of The New York Times Presents. It airs Friday, November 20 at 10 p.m. ET/PT on FX.

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