WATCH: Trump Says Dakota Access Pipeline Wasn’t Controversial
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WATCH: Trump Says Dakota Access Pipeline Wasn’t Controversial

President Donald Trump downplayed dissent over the Dakota Access Pipeline, saying he didn’t get “one call” about it.

You can watch the video of Trump’s comments above. Trump also said, “As you know, I approved two pipelines that were stuck in limbo forever. I don’t even think it was controversial.” His comments, to a group of sheriffs, came as the U.S. Army announced it would cancel further environmental study and allow the Dakota Access Pipeline to go forward, following heed from Trump’s executive order allowing the pipelines, which the Obama administration was far less open to.

Trump added of the DAPL and Keystone XL pipelines, “You know, I approved them and I haven’t even heard one call from anybody saying, ‘oh, that was a terrible thing you did.’ You know, usually, if I do something it’s like bedlam, right? I haven’t had one call from anybody.”

Trump and other supporters of the pipelines say they will bring jobs and reduce dependence on foreign oil. However, months of intense protests and clashes with North Dakota law enforcement occurred at the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota. That tribe has fervently opposed the pipeline as a danger to water sources and cultural heritage site, and it’s found support from other Indian nations, people, and celebrities. The protests were called the most significant gathering of Indian people in decades.

If Trump didn’t think DAPL was controversial, perhaps Trump missed these images, which were just some of the stark scenes to emerge at the DAPL protests.

(Getty)

(Getty)

standing rock

The scene of protests. (Getty)

#nodapl

Activists demonstrate near a Hillary Clinton presidential campaign fundraiser featuring US President Barack Obama to call for a halt to the Dakota Access Pipeline project on October 24, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California. (Getty)

#nodapl #standingrock

The #NoDAPL protesters are spreading their message to the media, banks, and politicians, hoping to make known human rights abuses in the area. (Getty)

Protestors march to a construction site for the Dakota Access Pipeline to express their opposition to the pipeline, at an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's to protest against the construction of the new oil pipeline, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on September 3, 2016. The Indian reservation in North Dakota is the site of the largest gathering of Native Americans in more than 100 years. Indigenous people from across the US are living in camps on the Standing Rock reservation as they protest the construction of the new oil pipeline which they fear will destroy their water supply. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Getty)

Protestors march to a construction site for the Dakota Access Pipeline to express their opposition to the pipeline, at an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s to protest against the construction of the new oil pipeline, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on September 3, 2016. (Getty)

North Dakota Access Pipeline

Native American protesters and their supporters stand before bulldozers doing work for the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) oil pipeline. (Getty)

North Dakota Access Pipeline protests

Protesters hold a rally with the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in support of a lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers and plans for the Dakota Access Pipeline outside the US District Court in Washington, DC, August 24, 2016. (Getty)

Native Americans march to a burial ground sacred site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), near the encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the oil pipeline that is slated to cross the Missouri River nearby, September 4, 2016 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Protestors were attacked by dogs and sprayed with an eye and respiratory irritant yesterday when they arrived at the site to protest after learning of the bulldozing work. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

Native Americans march to a burial ground sacred site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), near the encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s protest. (Getty)

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5 Comments

Anonymous

What?!?!? Have you been in Russia or somethingbanf not seen whats been happening EVERYWHERE?

Kim Kubik

What about the aquafer? In my opinion, I believe we need to think about this a little more. Just because we place the pipes deeper doesn’t mean it is safer. It means that if there is a leak, it will be harder to detect and correct. I am ashamed and appalled that there are seven other lines in place and until I went to DAPL, I wasn’t informed about this. Saddened by this. Are these lines in place because of greed? I wish the press would be more informative. Why aren’t we given all the facts? Is this really the right thing to do?

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